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THE 



HISTORY OF EVERTON, 



INCLUDING 



dF&miliav mmxtattom on ttje WtopU, 



AND .rta 

v.- 

DESCRIPTIVE DELINEATIONS OF THE SEVERAL & SEPARATE 
PROPERTIES OF THE TOWNSHIP. 



WITH MAP, PLATES, AND WOOD-CUTS. 



BY ROBERT SYERS. 



" History is the roast beef of literature, on which all minds may feed 
advantageously ; but those who are fond of feasting ou literary fricasees, 
truffles, and trifles, seldom relish a dish so plain ; and yet of all the dishes 
that intellect feeds on, history is the most nutritious." — Ethic Scraps. 






LIVERPOOL: 

PUBLISHED BY G. & J. ROBINSON, CASTLE-STREET, 
AND D. MARPLES, LORD-STREET. 

1830. 



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PREFACE. 



Having commenced this work under impres- 
sions precisely similar to many of those which 
are expressed in the following passages, I trust 
I shall he excused recording them in the form 
of a preface. 

' Historians roam from hook to hook, as hees 
from flower to flower ; the latter in quest . of 
materials, for the construction of the wonder- 
ful economy of their hives, the former to rifle 
the stores of literature, and collect such sub- 
stances and sweets as may properly serve to 
construct their volumes. 

From the lips of the ancient and of the ob- 
servant, the historian also collects the honey 
of tradition, and prepares it for the palates of 
his readers. 



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vi. PREFACE. 

But although to dive deep into the sea of 
retrospection may be the pleasure as well as 
the duty of the historian, yet he should never 
fail to swim on the surface of that passing cur- 
rent which time rolls along ; and as he thus 
swims, he should be earnestly mindful of the 
existing state of men, mind, and matter ; mak- 
ing himself familiar with the complexion and 
concerns of his compeers, and indeed of his 
contemporaries of all grades, their operations, 
propensities, professions, and possessions ; and 
with such ability as he possesses, depicture and 
record his observations and discoveries ; for it 
is only when the historian works with materials 
found in, and furnished by, his own times, that 
he is at all likely to produce the grand deside- 
ratum of history — truth, which alone gives 
strength, brilliance, and value to historical 
works. With some force, and much truth, an 
author has said, " I can, with satisfaction to 
myself, and with tolerable certainty of being 



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PREFACE. vii. 

comprehended, describe to my friend and 
reader the events of . the ..present day; . but 
matters that have been buried by time for 
years in the vaults of my memory, I do not 
easily disentomb, nor are they, when exhumed, 
any other than mere ghosts, skeletons, or sha- 
dows of the realities they once were." ;,..,.. 

As to errors, inconsistencies, and omissions, 
readers must reconcile themselves to meet with 
them, as is clearly demonstrated by the fol- 
lowing anecdote : When Sir Walter Raleigh 
was a prisoner in the tower, he employed him- 
self in the compilation of a history of the world : 
it chanced one time, whilst, so employed, that a 
tumult arose under his window ; he could, not 
see the perpetrators of the breach of peace, 
but, as was natural, made inquiries from 
many persons of the cause and nature of the 
broil ; but no two descriptions of the tumult 
agreed ; every version of it differed : the diffi- 
culty of procuring an authentic account of a 



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viii. PREFACE. 

matter that had taken place so recently, and 
so near, raised, as it well might, such doubts 
in Sir Walter's mind, as to the truth of the 
data he had collected of circumstances ancient 
and remote, that his reflections thereon had 
nearly caused him to cast aside his work in 
disgust and despair. 

Great attention and considerable expense 
have been bestowed on the compilation of the 
matter, and the engraving of the map, to repay 
which would require a much higher price than 
is demanded for the work ; but it was not an 
expectation of profit that led to its publication, 
for, indeed, were every copy to be sold at the 
declared price, no pecuniary gain worthy of 
notice would remain. 

When I issued my prospectus, ambitious 
men and popularity-hunters saw no tempting 
bait hooked on my proposals ; I had nothing 
to offer wherewith to purchase the encourage- 
ment of those wary and worldly-minded cha- 



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PREFACE. ix. 

racters, nor to stimulate such personages to 
part with the required trifling contribution, 
but a probable shew of my mite being utile 
to the public ; a liberal few, however, came 
forward, who deserve and have my thanks. 

There are,' doubtless, many who may deem 
a history of Everton not of sufficient conse- 
quence to warrant their patronage and pecu- 
niary support; but if we glance at futurity, 
when Everton shall have become an eminent 
place, and, in a measure, individualized with 
the great commercial town of Liverpool, then, 
perhaps, this account of the rise, progress, po- 
pulation, extent, &c. of the township, will be 
deemed a serviceable record, and the pecuniary 
consideration of its cost will lose much of its 
present characteristic importance with" those 
who may then possess this humble History of 
Everton. 

As to criticism — when slighted buttercups 
and grassy-flowers become worthy of the scien- 



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X. PREFACE. 

tific florist's attention, then may my work be 
deemed worthy of the learned critic's notice ; 
but, in the mean time, it is consolatory to know 
that humble buttercups, and nutritious grass, 
are more serviceable in the world's economy, 
than gaudy tulips and proud pinks. 

I conclude, with assurances to the reader 
that I have strenuously endeavoured to travel 
in the path of truth, and to give as much inte- 
rest to this treatise as the paucity of materials 
permitted. 



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CONTENTS. 



Aborigines ... 

Ashburnham, Lord (and Lady) 
of manor .... 

Ancient state of Everton, pro- 
bable 

Antiquities 

Acres, different sized . 

Amusements . .126, 

Archery . . . . 

Assemblies . 

Ashton, , of Kirkdale 

Anabaptists' Cemetery 

Briganti ■ . 

Boadicea . * 

Barret, Jobn, Lord of manor, 

Blanch, Lady of manor 

Breck-silver 

Building, old mode of 

Buildings near beacon burnt, 

BonfiTes 

Brokers 

Book-society 

Breakfast-parties 

Barton, Thomas 

Bronte, villa of 

Birchall, Mr. 

Bullin, Christopher 

Beacon of faggots 

Bold, Jonas 

Bennett, Mrs. 



Page 
5 

32 


Appleton, William 
Adamson, Roger 
Atherton, James 


271 


Page 
246 
247 

281 




Anderton, family of 


. 


323 


36 
47 


Accident, melancholy 
Anecdote, lack of lamps 


• 


328 
369 


77* 


Assessors 


. 


385 


134 


Assessed taxes, amount 


. 


415 


140 


Annals of Everton 


. 


416 


143 


Act of Parliament for church 




202 


of St. George 


. 


422 



232 

] 
7 
7 

17 

18 

21 

54 

61 
128 
133 
139 
147 
156 
157 
173 
174 
176 
177 
191 



Banks, Miss, anecdote of 
Beezley, family of 
Bridge, family of 
Bruce, Rev. John 
Boundaries, new 
Brooks, Rev. Jonathan 
Brown, family of 
Boardman, John 
Ball, Thomas 
Boardman, R. B. 
Beetenson, Samuel 
Brooks, Joseph 
Buddicom, Rev. R. P. 
Byrom, William 
Batley, George 
Barton, Miles 
Blundell, James . 
Backhouse, Daniel 



. 194 

. 197 

. 209 

. 212 

. 234 
209, 247 

. 248 

. 275 

. 276 

. 277 

. 279 

. 284 

. 293 

. 297 

. 302 

. 306 



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Xll. 

Brandreth, Dr. 
Bushell, Mrs. Molly 
Barton, Rev. Henry 
Bowling-green 
Beacon 
Bridewell 



CONTENTS. 



Page 

. 313 

. 323 

. 332 

. 140, 334 

56, 350, 353 

. 310, 354 



Page 
Barn on the Hill . . 354 

Barracks . . . 167, 374 
Balloon ascent . . . 379 
Boundaries marked 357, 373, 383 
Beacon Society . . . 433 



Csesar, Everton in the time of 5 
Cartismunda ... 7 

Caractacus .... 7 
Constantine the Great . 8 

Castle built by Edward the 

Confessor . . .10 

Copyholders of West Derby 

apply to James I. .21 

Commons of Everton claimed 

by West Derby . . 22 

Citizens of London buy West 

Derby .... 23 
Citizens of London buy Ever- 
ton 27 

Citizens of London sell West 

Derby, Everton, and Waver- 

tree to Earl of Derby . 28 

Court Baron appointed . — 

Commons, part of, enclosed by 

the lord .... 29 
Copyhold rents settled and 

fixed .... — 

Cottage, Prince Rupert's . 47 
Cottage, Anderson's . . 50 
Cross, taken down . . 70 

Castle at West Derby . . , 71 
Climate . ... .87 

Courts, copyhold . . 101 

Court-house, Derby . ♦ — 
Common, part of, claimed by 

West Derby . . .114 
Customs, &c. of inhabitants. 1 1 6 

] 
Danes, incursions of the . 10 
Dinner parties . , . 1 47 



Concerts . . . .141 

Card playing . . 121, 146 

Cobbler's close . . . 156 

Campbell, George 

Corrie, Miss ... 

Case, George 

Cordes, James . 

Cabbage hall 

Chaffers, Edward and Misses 

Coleman, Misses 

Church, new, in Shaw-street 

Crescent, Everton brow 

Cope, Benjamin . 

Carson, John .... 

Cropper, John 

Campbell, Colin 

Centre district 

Clarke, family of 

Coffee-house 

Coleman, John, academy 

Cottages, general 52, 178, 352 

Constabulary department . 358 

Church parish-rate 

Customs of the manor 

Copyholds, nature of, &c. 

County-rate 

Church, Act for . 

Church of St. George 282, 381, 425 

Churchwardens of parish . 427 

Church-ley .... — 

Cemetery . . . 210, 429 

Classes of houses . . 433 



158 
168 
178 
181 
183 
191 
229 
233 
237 
246 
253 
257 
275 
291 
301 
315 
336 



385 
386 
391 
415 
422 



Dixon, William 
Davics, John 



241 

250 



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CONTENTS. 


Xlll. 




Page 




Page 


Dobson, Richard 


254 


Dyson, T. F. 


. 298 


Dickson, G. F. . 


293 


Deed, ancient 


. 397 


Drinkwater, John 


294 


Directory 


. 453 


Estovers, right of 


E 

6 Ewart, William . 


166, 220 


Edward the Confessor 


10 


Earle, William 


174, 255 


Earls of Derby . .' 15, 16 


Ellison, Seacome . 


226, 333 


Earl Derby, Wm. Geo. Rd. 




Expenditure, comparative . 349 


died 1702 


31 


Ellinthorpe, Joseph 


307, 359 


Etymology .... 


39 


Election of sub-constable . 363 


Employments 


123 


Easter-dues 


, 428 


East District 


176 






Ferrers, Wm., Earle of Derby 


15 Forrest, Alexander 


. 280 


Ferrers, Robt., Do. 


16 


Fry, Joseph . 


. 330 


Folly-fair .... 


136 


Fund to prosecute offenders 371 


Formby, Rev. Mr. 


188 


Fire-works 


140,381 


Fisher, John • . 


225 


Fifteens of the king 


. 397 


Gaunt, John of, lord of manor 


G 

18 Gascoyne, Bamber, Esc 


. 35, 173 


Green, Isaac, Esq. 


34 


Green, John 


. 178 


Geology, &c. 


73 


Gleave, Doctor 


1 208 


Gentry .... 


133 


Gregson, family of 


. 217 


Games .... 


150 


Goring, George . 


178, 223 


Geese, adventure with a flock 




Green, Robert and Misses . 224 


of 


159 


Greenway, Mr. 


. 248 


Gloucester, Prince William 


168 


Gloucester, Duke of 


. 371 


Geller, J. G. 


— 






Heptarchy .... 


9 Holmes, I. & H. 


. 210 


Holland, Robert de, lord of 




Hanmer, Latham 


— 


manor 


16 


Huson, f. . 


. 245 


JJarrison's, William, lecture 




Harrison, family of 


. 248 


on botany 


64 


Horsefall, Charles 


174, 258 


Headless cross . . 72 


, 167 


Houghton, Richard 


. 260 


Harding, William 


178 


Holmes, James 


. 273 


Hodgson, Adam 


181 


Hornby, Joseph . 


. 281 


Heyes, family of 


193 


Harris, T., academy 


. 288 


Hodgson, E. L. 


201 


Heyworth, Ormerod 


. 290 


Halsall, family of 


204 


Hind, John 


. 292 


Hodgson, Thomas 


209 


Heyworth, James 


. 294 



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XIV. 

Higginson, John 
Hope, family of 
Harper, William 



CONTENTS. 



Page 
303 
304 
312 



Historical summary 
Hollow way from Everton 



Pag* 
339 

345 



Johnson, John, family of , 199 Johnson, George 
Kirk dak- rented right of com- 



mon 
Kirkdale cattle-fair 



Kirkdale bridewell 
20, 29 Knowles, T., academy 
. 262 Kirkdale 



172, 251 

. 266 
. 300 
. 348 



Liverpool, value of, in 1327 17 
Law suit of Everton with ci- 
tizens of London . . 25 
Lord's rent of Everton, 1642 28 
Leaseholds how transferred . 115 
Lower orders . . .130 
Litt, W. P. . .166 

Lang, John . . . 167 

Lord's rent, &c, how now 

paid . . . 113, 171 

Lodge, Adam . . .218 
Latham, Misses . . .221 
Loggerheads . . . 236 

Livingstone family . . 243 
Leigh, J. S. . . . . 265 



Molyneux, Sir Richard, stew 

ard of manor 
Manor, Everton a distinct 
Measure, total, of Everton 
Mines under copyholds 
Manners, customs, &c. 
Merchants . 
Manners 
Mere Bank villa 
Myers, William . 
Mere or watering pool 

Name, Everton's, first regis 

tered 
Northumbrians 



Ledson, Rt. . . . 274 

Lister, Edward . . . 276 
Led ward, Edward . . 280 

Lorimer, Ellis . . 300, 304 
Lowrie, Thomas . . .319 
Lyon, John . .321, 359 

Lighting and watching . 368 

Law bill .... 384 
Lancashire, value of . . 397 
Lease of 115 acres of Everton 

land . 107, 112, 400, 410 

Leys, ancient . . .413 
Lands given or sold to and by 

the township . . . 476 



M 

Mather, John , . .174 

28 Mawdsley, Edmd. . .213 

30 Marsh, Mrs. . . . 244 

76 Mather, J. P. . . .256 

104 Mc Gregor, Alexander 168, 279 

116 Mayors, mock . . , 295 

132 Mercer, George . . .318 

134 Mc George, John . . 320 

169 Municipal management . 365 

170 Meetings how convened . 367 
— Map .... 153,384 

ft 

Nobles of Everton, anecdote of 118 

4 North District . . . 155 

9 North View . . 164, 167 



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CONTENTS. 


XV. 






Page 




Page 


North-east District 


. 


172 


Netherfield, Rebecca . 


. 242 


Nicholson, William 


. 


205 


North-west District 


. 261 


Necropolis . . . 


• 


210 

r 


Naylor, Richard 


. 322 


Oratorio 




142 Okill, Charles 


. 334 


Oldham family 




177 


Offenders, fund to prosecute 371 


Oddhouse 


186 


.332 


Owners of houses, &c. 


. 433 


Picts and Scots, invasions 


of 


8 


P 
Pyke, John 


. 192 


Prince Rupert's head-quarters 


47 


Plumpton, James 


198, 232 


Pauper's pie, anecdote of 




67 


Potter, family of 


. 259 


Pastimes . 


. 


127 


Post-office 


. 308 


Pilgrim, villa of . 


. 


156 


Perry, William 


. 335 


Pritchard, Edward (woollen 




Privy search 


. 357 


draper, not wine merchant, 




Pinfold near the mere 


. 171, 382 


as stated in context,) 


. 


167 


Pauperism 


179, 384 


Powell, Richard . 


. 


186 


Parish church-rate 


. 385 


Pickering, William 


. 


,188 


Population . * 


84, 415 


Pyke family 


. 


190 







Q 



Quarry . . . .265 

Roman conquest . . 5 

Roger de Montgomery . 12 

Ranulph, Earl of Chester . 13 

Routes . . . .143 

Reeves, Thomas . . .186 

Richardson, R. . .187 

Rowe, family of . . . 196 

Russell, William . . 208 

Roscoe, William . .219 

Robbers, conflict with . 230 

Rowe,. Miss . . .239 



R 



Ross family . . . 242 

Robinson, William . . 249 

Rose, Joshua (not Joseph) . 253 
Reservoir, Bootle Water Com- 



pany 
Roach, family of 
Rice, family of 
Rogerson, Edward 
Rupert, Prince 
Rental of Everton 



268 
305 
325 
330 
341 
415 



Severus .... 8 

Saxons .... 9 

Stone of Everton . . 74 

Soil of Everton ... 75 
Situation of E verton admirable 90 
Sabbath employments . .125 
Suppers . . . .144 



Sleeper >s-hill . . .156 
St. Domingo estate, history of 

' 108, 158 
Sparling, John, Esq. 110, 158, 161 
Sandbach and Mc <3regor . 167 
Salisbury, Marquis of . 35, 173 
Sleeper, Great • . . .175 



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xvi. 


CONTENTS. 






Page 




Page 


Sleeper, Little 


. 176 


School, Everton and Kirk dale 


267 


South-east District 


. 181 


Signal station 


288 


South District 


. 189 


Stuhhs, Lewis 


297 


Syers, family of . 


. 200 


Sharp, Miss, academy . 


297 


Strong, John 


. 201 


Shand, Charles 


312 


Slingsby, Mr. 


. 203 


Smithy, old 


317 


Shaw, John 


. 204 


Sandiford, R 


320 


Statham, family of 


. 209 


Soldiers, Everton provided two 341 


Shaw, Thomas 


. 206, 215 


Siege of Liverpool 


, — 


South-west District 


. — 


Skeletons, two, found . 


345 


Shaw-street 


. — 


Savage, Mr. 


347 


Seacome family 


. 225 


Shaw, William . _ . 327 


,362 


Simpson, Joseph 


. 242 


Sadler, the aeronaut 


380 


Sanderson, H. J. . 


. 172, 251 


Soldier, order for 


399 


Tenants of Everton appl 


1 

y to the Taylor, John 


297 


crown to purchase the 


manor 27 


Tattersall, Thomas 


299 


Throstle-nest cottage 


. 63 


Topping, Mrs. 


319 


Tristram, Mr. 


. 68 


Toffy, Everton 


324 


Tatlock, family of 


. 199 


Thompson, Alex., constable . 


360 


Tristram, family of 


. 224 


Taxatory concerns 


368 


Tarlton, family of 


. 255 


Tables of finance, &c. . 


404 


Tatlock, William 


. 269 


Tenures ... 94 


,433 



Views from Everton 

Value, comparative, of Ever- 

William the Conqueror 
Wavertree, value of, in 1327 
West Derby and Wavertree 

compound with James I. 
West Derby sold to citizens 

of London 
West Derby, disputes with, 

about waste land 
Wood not abundant at Everton 
Will, surrender to use of, not 

necessary 
Wakes of West Derby 
Woodhouse, Samuel 
Whalley, Mr. 



ton land 



79 



Verses on Everton barracks ♦ 378 

W 

12 Workhouse projected . .171 

17 West Derby claims Everton * 

commons, . . . 22, 185 



22 


Williamson, John 


. 202 




Withers, George 


. 225 


23 


West District 


. 234 




Waterhouse, N., younger 


. 239 


33 


Wright, John 


. — 


81 


Wainwright, William . 


. 247 




Wiatt, family of . 


. 251 


106 


Waterhouse, family of 


, 301 


138 


Witchcraft 


. 341 


157 


Workhouse, Ormskirk,&c. 349,351 


165 


Watching 


. 370 



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HISTORY OF EVERTON. 



SECTION I. 



INTRODUCTION. 

Everton is a Township and Manor, in the parish 
of Walton-on-the-hill, in the county of Lancaster. 
The township extends, in length, from north to south, 
1^ mile; its' greatest breadth, east and west, is 1 
mile and 1 furlong; it is distant about 1^ mile from 
the east bank of the Mersey, and about 3 miles from 
the mouth, or entrance, of that river. 

On the north, Everton is bounded by the township 
of Walton, and the village of Kirkdale ; on the east, 
also, by the lands of Walton ; on the south, by the 
lands of the township of West Derby, and village of 
Low-hill ; and, on the west, by the town and lands 
of the borough and parish of Liverpool. 

Everton is situated in 53° 22' north latitude, and 
in 2° 28' west longitude, from the meridian of London; 
from which city it is distant 202 miles. 

There are few places in England, or indeed in any 
other country, so highly favoured, by situation, as 

B 



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2 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

Everton; in picturesque, beautiful, and interesting 
scenery, it has scarcely a rival in Britain. On its 
western side, it rises with gentle acclivity, until its 
crest, or the summit of its brow, acquires a com- 
manding eminence, which overlooks the modem Tyre. 

From the western parts of Everton-hill may be 
plainly seen the fertile lands of Cheshire, the moun- 
tains of Wales, the river Mersey, and the expanding 
Irish Sea, where numberless vessels are continually 
moving, ingressing and egressing to and from 
Albion's Western Emporium : and, in favourable 
weather, the spectator on Everton-hill may behold 
the Isle of Man, and the bold promontories of the 
north coast of Wales. From the northern part of 
Everton may be seen, in the north-west, the estuary 
of the Mersey, the channels by which the haven of 
Liverpool is approached and left, and, at times, the 
dangerous sand-banks that extend from the estuary 
of the Mersey for many leagues sea-ward, the dread 
of pilots and poor mariners : more northwardly, also 
is seen, from Everton's northern parts, the extensive 
and deeply-indented bay of Bootle, the marshes of 
Bank Hall, the warren of Crosby, several jutting 
promontories on the sea-board, and the church and 
hamlet of Walton-on-the-hill ; whilst the distant hills 
of Cumberland, Westmoreland, and Yorkshire fringe 
the horizon, and bound the spectator's view on the 
north and north-east. 

About mid-way on the eastern edge of Everton 
the land gradually slopes, until it joins the extensive 



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INTRODUCTION. 6 

plains of neighbouring townships, over which are in- 
terspersed gentle mounds and rising hillocks, which 
relieve the prospect from tame flatness: and, from 
those eastern parts, taking an inland view, in the 
proper season, may be seen all that can be desired of 
rural beauty; the eye being relieved by a view of 
lofty hills in the distance; the intermediate plains 
serving the husbandman for an area where he per- 
forms his agricultural labours profitably to himself, 
and advantageously to the population in Iris neigh- 
bourhood. 

On the south, Everton is joined to land of equal, 
if not superior elevation with itself; consequently, the 
extent of prospect from its southern border is circum- 
scribed and limited. 

The western parts of Everton are rapidly assimi- 
lating and connecting themselves with Liverpool; 
numberless dwellings are here annually erected; 
nay, so magical is now the builder's power, that, it 
might be said, many dwellings are constructed in this 
quarter weekly, — generally but small domiciles, and 
chiefly intended for the occupation of the humble : 
but the slope of the brow, and the platform-a*e$t, are 
studded over with beautiful villas and elegant man- 
sions, where the wealthy children of the commerce of 
Liverpool, and the retired gentry, with their families, 
reside. In fine, such is Everton at this day; a 
delectable spot indeed, and almost entitled to the 
denomination of Modern Arcadia. 



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4 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

It may, however, be as well now to enter on an 
enquiry touching its ancient state, commencing with 
its first known existence as a residence of man ; and 
proceed to notice such events as appear to be con- 
nected with every period of its general, and, what 
may be termed, its local history. 

Everton has its name inscribed on the pages of the 
Doomsday Book; but, prior to the epoch in which 
that book was composed, its history would seem to be 
buried in the sea of oblivion, where it now lies, be- 
yond the reach of the penetrative and studious en- 
quirer. The most expert antiquarians have not been 
able to dive deep enough into that unknown depth, 
and, in all likelihood, never will, so as to restore to 
the light of day the minutia of its history antecedent 
to the eleventh century. Common place, in all like- 
lihood, were the events in which Everton was con- 
cerned when possessed by the ancient Britons or 
aborigines ; it probably never was, in their time, the 
site of city, castle, or palace, nor the scene on which 
warriors strove for glory or victory ; but that war and 
slaughter have often erected their destroying stand- 
ards in places not remote from Everton, is made 
evident by authentic information ; and, doubtless, 
many a time and oft, the ancient inhabitants of 
Everton have witnessed the array of passing war- 
riors, the shouts of pursuing victors, and the lamenta- 
tions of the flying vanquished. 

When Caesar landed in Britain, that which is now 



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INTRODUCTION. D 

Lancashire* formed a part of the kingdom or province 
of the Briganti, one of seventeen states into which 
Britain was in those days divided : the inhabitants of 
that part or division of the dominions of the Briganti, 
whicli is now named Lancashire, had then the distinc- 
tive appellative of Segantii, or Sestuntii; and those 
inhabitants, as well also as all the Britons of remote 
times, were a rude, barbarous race of people, who, in 
winter, dwelt in caves, and in summer, resided in tem- 
porary, ill-constructed wooden huts. The use of clothes 
was unknown to those semi-savages ; some of them, 
indeed, partially covered themselves with the skins of 
animals, but such covering was only used occasionally, 
on the reception of strangers, or in very inclement 
weather, or during the performance of certain cere- 
monies, but seldom, if ever, as a tribute to decency. 
Of comfort, they had scarcely an idea; their bodies 
were painted entirely over with the juice of woad ; 
their wives they had in common; in short, taking 
them as represented at the Roman conquest, they were 
a race as barbarous and uncivilized as the Arabs of 
the desert : and yet, lovely and gentle fair ones, wise 
and wealthy lords, of these enlightened, civilized, and 
happy days, from this race have ye all sprung ! 
These aborigines were, however, brave and hardy, 

* It was after the Norman conquest, that certain territorial divisions of 
, England were designated, or known by the names of counties ; but in 
the time of the Saxons, after Egbert had reduced the Heptarchy into 
one monarchy, those divisions, or the main parts of them, even as they 
now exist, were formed, and were originally called " shires," a name they 
still retain, in common with the French term, " county. " 



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6 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

and though to have the fact of consanguinity blazoned 
forth, may he unpalateahle to the dainty, the squeam- 
ish, and the proud of the present day, yet it is but 
recording a truth to state that, however mixed with 
other blood, from those semi-barbarians are the present 
civilized, social, and polished children of Britain 
descended ; nor must it be forgotten, that the brave and 
undaunted spirit of our forefathers, rude and barbarous 
as they were, has, in a great degree, been permitted 
to descend to their posterity; the firm, unrivalled 
courage of the Waterloo heroes was an inheritance 
which had descended through a long line of ancestry, 
from the aboriginal Britains to the Waterloo heroes, 
that phalanx which fought for and achieved the 
freedom of Europe, on the 18th June, 1815, under 
the. great captain of the age. 

It is probable that Everton, at the time of the 
Roman invasion, and indeed long before that epoch, 
was a rude hamlet, or cluster of caverns. The 
probability is grounded on its being situated in the 
vicinity of a noble river ; but more particularly on 
Everton' s proximity to West Derby, which, even in 
the ninth and tenth centuries, was in a great measure, 
if not altogether, a forest, or nearly covered with 
wood ; out of which forest, as will be hereafter shewn, 
Everton had in early days, and for a length of time after, 
the right of estovers: it is therefore, indeed, very 
probable, that the wants of the earliest inhabitants of 
Everton had caused them, in the first instance, to cut 
down the timber of their own ground; but, in 



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INTRODUCTION. 7 

progress of time, they were necessitated to extend 
those limits for a continued supply of that constantly- 
needed article, for architectural and other purposes 
and uses : on such occasions, they naturally resorted 
to the forests and woods nearest to their domiciles. 

The Briganti, however, after the Romans had 
conquered the states of Britain, were impatient of 
their rule, and shortly appeared again in arms against 
their subduers; but their insurrection was speedily 
quelled, by the Roman general, Ostorius. Still there 
is no trace in tradition to fix the scene of any of those 
warlike operations on the site of Everton. It is 
probable, however, that its inhabitants witnessed the 
flight of Caractacus, who, on being defeated, in a 
great battle fought by him against the Romans, at 
a place named Caer-Caradoc, in Shropshire, fled to 
Cartismunda, Queen of the Brigantes, who, alas for 
the honour of one of Everton's sovereigns ! basely de- 
livered the unfortunate chieftain into the hands of the 
Romans; but the treacherous Cartismunda was en- 
treated according to her deserts, being deposed by 
her subjects : and thus were the people, of whom the 
Evertonians formed a part, driven again into war 
with the Romans, who strove in vain to re-instate 
Cartismunda. 

TheBriganti fought bravely, under Queen Boadicea j 
nor ought it be deemed an overstretch of fancy, that 
some Everton heroes ranged themselves under her 
banners. Boadicea, after various turns of fortune, 
was ultimately, in one great battle, overthrown, with 



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8 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

great slaughter, she herself escaping with great diffi- 
culty from the field. That calamity caused her to put an 
end to her existence by poison. Soon after Boadicea's 
death, the Brigantes, and indeed all Britain, sub- 
mitted to the Roman yoke. 

About the year 140, the Brigantcs again revolted, 
but were soon reduced by the Roman general, Lollius 
Urbicus. From this period, Britain is little noticed 
in history, till Severus divided the country into two 
provinces. The number was afterwards increased 
to three, by Constantine the Great, or rather to four ; 
viz. Britannia prima, Britannia secundi, and Maxima 
Caesariensis ; a portion of the last was afterwards 
erected into a separate province, under the title of 
Flavia Caesariensis. It is stated that Everton formed 
part of Flavia Caesariensis;* but that statement is open 
to doubt, there being good grounds, in various excel- 
lent authorities, to support the belief, that Lancashire 
remained a part and portion of Maxima Caesariensis. 
From the reign of Constantine to that of Honorius, 
the Roman rule in Britain gradually declined ; Rome 
being distant, and herself in danger, neglected to send 
forces to keep Britain in safety. In the reign of the 
latter Emperor, the British found themselves greatly 
annoyed, not only by the Picts and Scots, but by the 
Saxons also. The Romans at length (about the year 
430) finally abandoned the shores of Britain. 

After the departure of the Romans, the Scots and 
Picts again invaded Britain, and although they were 

* Kennion's MSS., as noticed in Gregson's Fragments of Lancashire. 



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INTRODUCTION. 9 

inet with desperate courage on the part of the Britons, 
who even once succeeded in driving them back into 
their own territories, north of the great wall, yet, 
so restless and daring were then* enemies, that the 
Britons, at length, found themselves necessitated to 
ask aid of the Saxons. Here commences a new sera 
in British history, to which Everton is indebted for 
its name, or rather, for a name from which its present 
title is derived. 

The warlike Saxons came in numbers, at the call of 
the Britons, to aid them in the expulsion of the Scots 
and Picts; but, ultimately, the Saxons formed a 
truce, and concluded a peace, with the tribes they 
were summoned to expel. Turning their arms 
against the Britons, the Saxons overran their land, 
and, in the year 458, became conquerors and rulers of 
the whole of Britain, with the exception of a part of 
Wales. 

Of the Heptarchy, it is not necessary to treat 
minutely ; it may suffice to state, that Everton, in the 
Heptarchial dominional divisions, became a part of 
the kingdom of Northumberland, and so remained 
during the reigns of the Anglo-Saxon monarchs of 
the Heptarchy; a period of time, during the whole of 
which the inhabitants of Britain seem to have been 
buried in profound ignorance. That period is too far 
distant from our own times to allow tradition to wear 
the garb of truth. The Northumbrians, however, 
were brave ; and, at the termination of the Heptarchy, 
they were the last of the Heptarchial subjects that 



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10 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

submitted to the government of Egbert, who, about 
the year 827, became sole monarch of Britain; the 
name of which he then changed to Angle-land, or 
England.* About five years after Egbert had 
established his new monarchy, the Anglo-Saxons 
began to be annoyed by the incursions of the Danes ; 
who, at length, subjected Northumberland. Under 
the Danish chiefs, the Northumbrians made many 
irruptions into Mercia, of which kingdom or dominion 
Shropshire and Cheshire were parts. During those 
wars, the people of Everton must have frequently 
witnessed, if they were not co-operating parties in, the 
conflicts which frequently took place, and were long 
continued, in their near neighbourhood. 

In such wars, the restless Northumbrians were 
continually engaged, until, soon after the year 1016, 
Canute became King of all England. Harold and 
Hardicanute succeeded Canute; and Edward the 
Confessor next reigned. Of a castle erected by 
Edward the Confessor, at a short distance from the 
south-east extremity of Everton, it is intended here- 
after to treat. 

In the time of Edward the Confessor, the govern- 
ment of Northumbria fell into the hands of one Tosti, 
a younger son of the celebrated Earl Godwin. This 
Tosti was a cruel tyrant, and, at length, drove the 
Northumbrians into rebellion. They, however, even- 
tually submitted, and were pardoned by the King, at 
the intercession of Harold the elder, brother to Tosti. 

* Leicester's History of Cheshire, as deduced from various authorities. 



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INTRODUCTION. 11 

Tosti fled to Flanders, but subsequently made an 
irruption into Northumberland, to serve the cause of 
Duke William, afterwards William I., the Conqueror 
and King of England. 

There is little doubt of the castle, erected near to 
Everton by Edward the Confessor, having been 
placed there to keep the restless Northumbrians in 
check • and many a deed of arms has unquestionably 
been performed in the vicinage of the place, both 
during and after Edward's reign. 

At the instigation of the Duke of Normandy, Tosti 
effected a landing with his troops in Northumberland, 
and was at first successful ; but his brother Harold, 
who, on the death of Edward the Confessor, became 
King of England, met and defeated him, at the head 
of the troops he had raised in Norway. The battle 
was fought at a place called Sandford. 

Tosti was totally defeated, and slain; but Harold- 
had scarcely time to rejoice at his victory, ere the 
news was brought to him of the landing of Duke 
William in England. 

Harold soon after met William, who was at the 
head of his Norman forces, at Hastings. Harold 
was defeated there and slain, and England submitted 
to the Norman conqueror. 

Of Tosti, there are many traditionary accounts, 
but they are certainly too vague and too vile to be 
credited, to their full extent j yet his character must 
have been mainly and deeply founded on deeds of 
wickedness ; and, doubtless, in his days, very 



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12 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

frequently, Las the blood of the inhabitants of Ever- 
ton been curdled in their veins, and their cheeks 
blanched, as tales were recounted to them of that 
tyrant's transactions ; or when, perchance, as is not 
unlikely, they were eye-witnesses to atrocities en- 
acted by him, or at his command. 

Thus, from time antecedent to that of Julius Caesar, 
unto that of William the Conqueror, has a brief out- 
line been given of the history of that part of England 
in which Everton is seated. What has been treated 
of has, however, no pretension to be styled local 
history; it is, indeed, acknowledged that there are no 
data extant, sufficiently credible, wherewith to frame 
such a history, during those ages of ignorance and 
tumult. 

But, leaving the broad ground over which the 
foregoing remarks have travelled, it may be proper 
now to strike into narrower limits, and only branch 
off into general matter, when the context absolutely 
requires it. 

By a grant whicli William the Conqueror made, 
about the year 1066, to his cousin, Roger de 
" Poictiers, the third son to Roger de Mont- 
gomery, of lands in Lancashire, lying between the 
rivers Ribble and Mersey, Everton became a part of 
Roger's barony, or honour; but Roger, having 
taken part in the rebellion against his monarch, 
was banished, and his estates were forfeited. To treat 
of Roger's forfeiture, and the successive proprietors 
immediately after him, would afford no interest to 



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INTRODUCTION. 13 

the reader, nor would it aid the object in view. 
Passing by those and such like circumstances, the 
earliest notice extant of Everton, separately and 
individually, receiving regal consideration, is in a 
mandate, issued in the 9th of Henry III., 

" anno 1225. The monarch, in that mandate,* 
commands the sheriff of Lancashire " to permit his 
tenants of Everton to have reasonable estovers out 
of the lung's wood at West Derby, as they were 
used to have in the time of his father, King John ; 
and that he do not compel them to do other suit and 
service than they were accustomed to in the time 
aforesaid." 

From this, and other ancient documents, it ap- 
pears, that Everton, in the thirteenth century (and, 
in all likelihood, long antecedent to that time), was a 
distinct township or manor of itself, and no part or 
parcel of the township or manor of West Derby ; the 
tenants of Everton holding their lands by yearly rent 
and service to the king. 

In the year 1229, by the King's letters 

* patent, Everton became the property of Ra- 
nulph, or Handle, Earl of Chester. This Ranulph 
was a brave and intrepid warrior ; he espoused 
the cause of the young Prince Henry (after- 
wards Henry III.), when Louis, the Dauphin of 
France, was called by the discontented barons to 



* " This mandate is directed to the Sheriff of the County of Lancaster 
(and not to the Steward or other officer of West Derby), which sheweth 
Everton is a distinct manor." — Seacome's MS. 



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14 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

wear the crown, and to rule over England. Louis 
continued for some time to march triumphantly over 
our then unhappy land, but the prudence and valour 
of Ranulph, and other loyal nobles, forced the foreign 
prince to forego his ambitious projects; and those 
loyal noblemen eventually fixed their legitimate na- 
tive prince on the throne of his ancestors : nor was 
King Henry unmindful of the obligation, for Ranulph 
continued ever after to stand high in the esteem and 
favour of his sovereign, whose cause he had so bene- 
ficially succoured, and whose rights he had so suc- 
cessfully upheld and secured. Ranulph was low of 
stature, and in personal appearance altogether plain, 
little, if at all, superior in that respect to the humblest 
plebeians of his day; but, in the hour of enterprize, 
his features became animated ; in the moments of 
excitement, his very nature seemed to change. In 
times of peace he was idolized in his domestic circle, 
and revered and beloved by liis numerous tenants 
and vassals ; whilst in the hour of battle, he was ever 
the terror of his foes. His hatred of Louis, and of 
all Frenchmen, was as excessive, as his love and 
loyalty to his young sovereign were boundless. 

On the demise of King John, Earl Ranulph suc- 
coured and secreted the young Prince Henry, until, 
by the wisdom, talent, and energy of the Earl, and 
other nobles, the claims and attempts of the Dauphin 
of France on the crown of England were nullified and 
destroyed; and, ultimately, the victory achieved at 
Lincoln over the Frenchman and his adherents, 



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INTRODUCTION. 15 

secured to the legitimate Prince Henry, England's 
proud throne/ This was principally effected through 
the bravery and ability of Everton' s lord and master. 
Ranulph dying without issue, Everton became the 
property of Agnes, one of his four sisters, who mar- 
ried William de Ferrers, Earl of Derby. Agnes 
became possessed also of the castle and town of West 
Derby ; and, in fine, of all the lands which belonged 
to the said Earl Ranulph, lying between the rivers 
Ribble and Mersey. 

In the 33d Henry III., anno 1249, William 
" de Ferrers, son and heir to the aforesaid Wil- 
liam de Ferrers, Earl of Derby, had the King's man- 
date, to the Sheriff of Lancashire, for the enjoyment of 
such lands, lying between the rivers Ribble and Mer- 
sey, as Ranulph, Earl of Chester, formerly possessed. 

In 36th Henry III., anno 1252, the said last 
"" named William de Ferrers obtained a charter 
for free warren, to himself, and his heirs, in all 
his demesnes and lands throughout his lordships of 
Liverpool, Everton, Crosbie, Wavertree, Salford, &c; 
which also sheweth that Everton was a distinct manor, 
or lordship, from West Derby : but the said Earl had 
previously, in 33d Henry III., anno 1249, first 
erected the two manors of West Derby and Waver- 
tree by his charter or grant of custom, and instituted 
the copyhold estates there j* yet he made no alteration 
as to the tenure of Everton. 

* In these, or the like words, " that lands shall he let on him that 
hought them, if he can agree reasonably with the Steward; in case 



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10 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

Iii 38tli Henry III., anno 1254, the said 
'last named Earl of Derby died, and was 
succeeded by Robert his son, who was the last Earl of 
Derby of this family, and who forfeited all his great 
estates in Lancashire to Edmund, younger son of 
King Henry III., who became Earl of Derby. 

Edmund died in 24th Edward I., anno 1296, 
" and was succeeded in honours and estate by his 
eldest son Thomas, Earl of Leicester, Derby, &c. 
The said Thomas gave Everton, together with other 
manors, to one Robert de Holland, a favourite of his. 
It would appear, however, that on the death of the 
said Thomas, Robert de Holland had no virtual title 
to produce; Everton, consequently, reverted to the 
last named Earl's family, and became a possession of 
Heniy, Earl of Lancaster, Leicester, Derby, &c, 
brother to the said Thomas, and his successor in 
honours and estate. The demise of the said Thomas 
must have occurred prior to the 1st Edward III., anno 
1327 ; for in that year, at an inquisition taken 
* at Lancaster, before one Simon de Grimsty, it 
is stated, "that Thomas, late Earl of Lancaster, &c, 
held in fee various manors" (of which Everton was 
one), " by the service of rendering an ambling nag, 
or 40s. per annum — and that there is at West Derby 
the site of an ancient castle — and that at Everton there 
are 19 nativi, who held 24 oxgangs" (about 13 acres 
each) " of land, at £4 16s. rent— and say that the Lord 

he cannot agree reasonably with the Steward, the said lands and tenements 
shall remain to the seller, " 



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INTRODUCTION. 17 

Henry, Earl of Lancaster and Leicester, is brother to 
the said Thomas, and next heir, &c."* At that 
period, Liverpool was worth only £30 10s. per annum, 
and Wavertree £7 9s. 4d. per annum. Allowing 
five for the family of each nativi, or housekeeper, the 
inhabitants of Everton, at the time here named, must 
have been in number about one hundred : Liverpool, 
Everton, Wavertree, Crosby, Salford, Toxteth, and 
SimonsAvood were the manors held of Edward I., 
by the service of an ambling nag. 

At an inquisition held at Wigan, 1st Edward 
'III., anno 1327, it appeal's that Robert de 
Holland entered into possession of Everton seven 
years before that period. 

In 25th Edward III., anno 1352, Henry, 
"" Earl of Lancaster, Derby, &c, " did give and 
grant his town of Everton, with all its wastes, &c, to 
John Barret, yielding for the said town four pounds ; " 
— but, in the event of the said John Barret dying 
without issue, then Everton was to revert to the Earl 
of Lancaster, &c, and to his heirs again, for ever. 
This deed, which is dated 23d February, 1352, clearly 

* In Seacome's MS. it is recited as follows. — "By this inquisition it 
appears that Everton was a manor of itself, and no part or parcel of West 
Derby; that the tenants were 19 in number, and held 24 oxgangs of land, 
by suit and service of the king, and a yearly rent. According to the 
best authors I have met with, an oxgang of land contains 1 3 acres ; 
so that 24 oxgangs make 312 acres, and agreeable to the quantity now 
claimed by Everton in the whole — viz. old enclosures, 130 acres; new 
enclosures, 60 acres ; and common, 120 acres : also the ancient tenants 
were 19 in number, and the rent the same we now pay." 

C 



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18 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

established Evertou to have been a manor of itself, 
with wastes and commons appertaining to it. 

The aforesaid Henry afterwards became Duke of 
Lancaster, and died in the 35th Edward III., 
" anno 1362, leaving two daughters, Maud and 
Blanch. Blanch married John of Gaunt, Earl of 
Richmond, who afterwards became Duke of Lancaster; 
and he had for Blanch's portion, amongst other lands, 
all her father's lands in Lancashire. John of Gaunt 
died, and was succeeded by Henry de Bolingbroke, 
Earl of Derby, his eldest son, who afterwards was 
King of England, by the name of Henry IV. ; where- 
by all the aforesaid lands (except Everton) came to 
the crown again, where they remained till the reign 
of King Charles L, when they were sold to certain 
citizens of London, as will hereafter appear at large. 

It would appear that the aforesaid John Barret 
died without issue; for in the 2d Henry IV., 
anno 1401, the king, by grant or charter, re- 
newed or confirmed to his tenants of West Derby, 
(which had also been gifted by the aforesaid Heniy, 
Earl of Lancaster, to John Barret,) their ancient 
tenure, as granted by the first named William Ferrers, 
Earl of Derby. Subsequent circumstances make it 
evident that Everton, on the demise of John Barret 
without issue, also reverted to the crown. 

It may not be amiss here to reiterate, that King 
Henry IV. was grandson to the before-named Heniy, 
Earl of Lancaster, Derby, &c. ; consequently, Ever- 



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INTKODUCTION. 19 

ton became the property of that monarch in due course 
of inheritance, on the demise of John Barret without 
issue.f 

1488 In the 3d Henry VII., anno 1488, an inqui- 
sition was taken at Walton, which shows that 
the boundary of the south part of Walton, " beginning 
at Carton Cross, and following to Darling Dale, and to 
the east end thereof, and so over the Breck, by one 
ancient ditch on the lands of Everton, called Hang- 
field,^ on the south part of the common of pasture of 
Walton, &c." The ditch here alluded to ran west- 
wardly, dividing Walton Breck from Everton Breck, 
and other north parts of Everton from the southern 
limits of Walton township, — Everton itself being in 
the parish of Walton. All the lands of Everton were 
known by the names of Hangfield, Whitefield, and 
Netherfield ; and at the time of the inquisition held 
at Walton, anno 1488, that part called Hangfield was 
quite open, but has been since enclosed, and runs 
along by lands which were once the commons of 

* In Seacome's MS. it is written as follows : " Now also upon failure 
of issue of John Barret (to whom the town of Everton was given by 
Henry, Earl of Lancaster, 25th Edward III.), the said town returned to 
the crown, pursuant to the said grant ; the exact time thereof I cannot 
discover ; hut this is the first time (the MS. bears the marginal mark of 
' 17th James I.') I have met with or observed the officers of the crown 
taking notice of the said town since the aforesaid grant." 

f This word is frequently written Hongfield, and by some writers 
Houghfield. I prefer Hangfield, that name being derived from hanging, 
or sloping field. To strengthen the propriety of my orthography, in this 
particular instance, it may be as well to state, that, in Gore's paper of 
26th July, 1810, certain fields of Walton are advertised as follows ; — 
" Fields in Walton-on-the-hill, called Hanging-fields. *' 



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20 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

Walton, as above described ; the ineres and bounds 
whereof are well known to the neighbouring inhabi- 
tants. 

It is evident that, in the 15th century, and no 
doubt long antecedent to that period, the greater 
part of the soil of Everton was nothing more than 
common or waste land. There are, however, at the 
present time, only one or two very insignificant 
patches unreclaimed from their natural state; and 
those are all that remain to the public of the once, 
extensive commons of Everton. 

Progressively, but not rapidly, have the enclosures 
of the commons of Everton been effected; and, doubt- 
less, what has been done is mainly attributable to 
Everton' s proximity to the rapidly encreasing town 
of Liverpool, the lands of Everton serving to depas- 
ture, temporarily and conveniently, the cattle intended 
for the use of that populous town. Not for their 
fertility were the wastes of Everton enclosed, for the 
soil is not richly fertile, nor highly productive ; Kirk- 
dale, its neighbour, has drained from the north lands 
of Everton some or most of the little freshness or fat- 
ness they ever possessed ; the former indeed may be 
called the garden of Liverpool. For the privilege of 
sending their cattle to depasture on the waste lands 
and commons of Everton, the people of Kirkdale paid 
annually 6s. 8d. to the township of Everton; and it 
appears that the township of Everton had itself to pay 
13s. 4d, annually to the crown, as a quit or chief rent 



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INTRODUCTION. 21 

for the commons and wastes. This chief rent of 
13s. 4d., which is called " Breck-silver," is still 
annually paid to the lord of the manor. 

These wastes and commons are here thus briefly 
noticed, preparatory to what immediately follows. 

In 17th James L, anno 1620, a deputation, 
* consisting of Robert Fazakerly, Ralph Mercer, 
Richard Bower, Robert Worral, and John Wallworth, 
was sent by the copyholders of West Derby and 
Wavertree, to treat with the crown touching a com- 
position to be paid to his majesty, James I., for con- 
firmation of said copyholders' estates, and for grant- 
ing the wastes and commons of said manors, by copy 
of court-roll. At which treaty, it was proposed by 
his majesty's commissioners, "that such copyhold 
tenants of said towns as shall, upon notice thereof, 
consent and agree to pay his majesty thirty years' 
rent of their ancient rent, at the days and times 
therein mentioned, his majesty would confirm to. said 
tenants, so agreeing, and their heirs for ever, by 
decree of court, and by act of parliament, all their 
copyhold lands, paying, upon the death of any tenant, 
or upon surrender to be made, to his majesty, his 
heirs, or successors, one-third part of the said yearly 
rent, for a fine ; and that such of his said tenants as 
should accept said composition, shall have and enjoy, 
to them and their heirs, all the commons and waste 
lands nnthin the said towns, the same to be indif- 
ferently divided by commissioners, and to be granted 
to said tenants by copy of court-roll ; and the yearly 



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22 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

rent of 4d, per acre, of seven and a half yards to the 
perch, to he paid his majesty, his heirs, &c, for ever; 
the first payment to he made within one whole year 
after such enclosure, and quiet possession thereof he 
obtained." 

, To the terms of this composition, it would appeal*, 
the tenants of West Derby and Wavertree acquiesced, 
" but the people of Everton were neither art nor part 
concerned in the measure; neither did any of them 
appear at the said treaty ; being, in relation to their 
wastes and commons, upon a different footing with 
either West Derby or Wavertree, as paying anciently 
both rent and taxes for the same, as many receipts 
certify,"* It however happened that, under some 
misconception, or mal-interpretation of the decree of 
court, or with a view to reap benefit to themselves, at 
the expense of others, the copyholders of West Derby 
"surveyed and proposed to make allotments of the 
wastes of Everton, as well amongst the copyholders 
and others of Everton, as the copyholders and others 
of West Derby." To this intended allotment of the 
Everton wastes, by the people of West Derby, the 
people of Everton stoutly demurred, and against 
which the copyholders of Everton made vigorous 
efforts of resistance; applying themselves to the 
honoiu-able court of the duchy, and there making it 
appear that Everton was a manor of itself, known by 
the meres and bounds, distinct from West Derby; 
and that the wastes of Everton had, time out of mind, 

* MS. of Seacome. 



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INTRODUCTION. 23 

been taken and had by the tenants of Everton. The 
result of the application made by the copyholders of 
Everton to the duchy court, will be best understood 
from a copy of the order issued by that court, 
18th James I., anno 1621. The order ran 
thus: — "It is ordered that the allotments and en- 
closures of the wastes of Everton shall stay and be 
forborne till further hearing of said difference, at 
which time this court will order to whom the said 
wastes of Everton shall be granted." After the 
issuing of this order, it w^ould appear that the pro- 
ceedings altogether dropt, and the tenants of Everton 
remained in quiet and peaceable possession, as for- 
merly.* 

In the 4th Charles I., anno 1629, the king, 
" by letters patent, dated 14th June, 1629, 
granted to Edward Ditchfield, John Highlord, Hum- 
phrey Clarke, and Francis Mosse, citizens of London, 
and to their heirs, (amongst other things) the manor 
of West Derby. Under colour of which patent, the 
said patentees claimed, not only West Derby, but 
likewise the manors of Wavertree, and of Everton, — 
" which then were, and time out of mind had been, 
several and distinct manors of themselves, paying 
distinct and several rents (still answered and paid) to 
his majesty, and his progenitors, for the same; and, 



, * There is a false surrender in the town's chest, which, it is sup- 
posed, was fabricated to give a colour to the claims of West Derby on 
and to a participation of property and right in the wastes and commons 
of Everton. 



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24 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

therefore, not passed from his majesty by the said 
letters patent and grant of the said manor of West 
Derby." Thus were the tenants of Everton instructed 
by their counsel learned in the law. 

The tenants of Everton refusing to pay unto the 
afore-named patentees any suit or service, at their 
court held at West Derby, the said patentees caused 
their goods to be distrained, and the said tenants of 
Everton replevied the said distresses \ upon which, a 
suit at law commenced by the said patentees against 
the tenants of Wavertree, and of Everton, who, being 
but poor men, and unable to contest the same with 
the city of London, did, in the month of May, 
" 1632, petition his majesty to refer the exami- 
nation, and decision of the said difference to the then 
chancellor of the duchy of Lancaster : to which peti- 
tion his majesty was pleased to accede, ordering the 
chancellor of the duchy, assisted by his majesty's 
attorney-general, to take the case into consideration, 
and " as they shall find most equal and agreeable to 
truth and justice, by the, best and fittest means they 
can, satisfy the doubts and differences of the dis- 
putants." 

On the 20th June, 1632, Lord Newburgh, the 
then chancellor of the duchy of Lancaster, called on 
the parties disputant to assemble at the duchy-house, 
in the Strand, London, on the 6th November then 
next ensuing ; which assembly or meeting took place. 
When counsel for the disputants were heard, the 
judges (being the chancellor, the lord chief baron of 



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INTRODUCTION. 



25 



1633. 



the exchequer, and the attorney-general), on 
the 23d December, 1633, ordered as follows : 
"That the tenants of Wavertree, and of Everton, 
may keep their rents in their hands, and shall not be 
troubled by distress, or other process, out of this 
court, for the same, until such time as they have 
direction from this court to whom they shall pay the 
same." 

The aforenamed patentees were not satisfied with 
- this order, and therefore, on the 23d June, 1634, 
" (intending to weary out the poor tenants) 
brought their bill in chancery,* and also amerced and 
distrained said tenants for non-payment of their rents, 
and for not. appearing and doing their service, &c. ; 
whereupon, on the 20th November, 1634, the said 
tenants again applied to the court of the duchy, and 
that court thereupon made the following order: — 
"That the bailiff of the manor of West Derby, upon 
notice of this order, shall forbear to impose, collect, or 
gather any fines or amercements of any of said tenants 
and inhabitants of Wavertree, and of Everton, for 
not appearing or doing service at the said halmote- 



* The parties to the bill were, — 
Edward Ditch field, 
John Highlord, 

Humphrey Clarke, \ Plaittt ^ 
Francis Mosse, 



Rowland Johnson, 
Anthony Johnson, 
R. Mosse, 
John Mosse, 
Ralph Higginson, 
John Henshaw, 
James Ackers, 
Thomas Greaves, 
Thomas Gover, 
James Woolfall, 



Defendants. 



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26 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

courts, kept for the said manor of West Derby, or for 
any other matter against them or any of tliem in 
anywise." 

On the 11th February, 1635,* the court of 
* chancery dismissed the cause depending out of 
that court, ** and the rights of Everton were esta- 
blished, and possessions quieted as before :" but this, 
as will shortly appear, did not put an end to the 
disputes and legal proceedings between the <said 
patentees, and the tenants of Wavertree, and of 
Everton. 

On the 17th February, 1635, the court of chancery 
issued the following order : — " It is ordered that the 
receiver-general shall forthwith receive from the te- 
nants of Everton the amounts of their rents, being in 
arrrear two and a half years, ended at the feast of 
St. Michael the archangel last past, amounting iu 
toto to £12 lis. lid.; the said receiver, on payment 
thereof, shall give them an acquittance for the same : 
and it is further ordered, that from henceforth they 
shall continue the payment of the said rents to the 
said receiver-general, as they shall grow due, till this 
court take further order therein to the contrary : and 
it is last ordered, that none of the tenants of Everton 
shall be distrained, or molested in their lands or 
goods, for the same rent so paid ; and to that end this 
order shall be enrolled with the auditor of the north 
parts." 

* In Seacome's MS., and in Gregson's Fragments, this is 1634 j but I 
think the context sanctions the date I have given. 



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V 



INTRODUCTION. 27 

Sometime in the year 1635, the tenants of Waver- 
tree, and of Everton, petitioned the king to be admit- 
ted purchasers ; and that in the mean time a court 
may he kept for them, as formerly. The considera- 
tion of which petition his majesty was pleased to refer 
to Lord Cottington, and the attorney-general, with 
whom the said tenants or their agents were admitted 
to treat ; and upon the terms propounded, had liberty 
to go down and advise with the rest of the land 
tenants thereabout. In the mean time, and whilst 
this treaty was in agitation, to prevent the conclusion 
thereof, the plaintiffs (the patentees), by their coun- 
sel, moved the court to have the case retained; 
whereupon, on the 20th May, 1636, the court 
made the following order : — " That the plain- 
tiffs shall reply to the defendants' answers before the 
end of Michaelmass term next, and the cause to pro- 
ceed to a legal hearing in this court, according to 
the ordinary course ; and the injunction formerly 
granted, to stand in force." 

And again, on the 8th May, 1638, it was 

* ordered, that the cause be set down to be 
heard on the 1th of June next, on ten days' warning 
being given to the plaintiffs, or one of them. But 
the plaintiffs, instead of coming to a hearing, pur- 
suant to the above order, made purchase of the said 
manors of Wavertree, and of Everton; and King 

Charles I., by his letters patent, dated in the 

* 14th year of his reign, did give and grant to 
Ditchfield, Highlord, Clarke, and Mosse, the town 



) 



s 



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28 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

or towns of Wavertree, and of Everton; whereupon 
the tenants of Wavertree, and of Everton, paid their 
rents to the said purchasers, &c. It must be kept in 
remembrance, however, that Everton was not pur- 
chased as part, parcel, or member of the manor of 
West Derby, but as a distinct township and manor 
of itself, with all its rights, &c. &c. And thus, after 
much trouble and expense, the point became esta- 
blished, that Everton is a manor of itself, independent 
of West Derby, and other neighbouring manors. 

On the 20th June, 1639, Ditchfield, Highlord, 
Clarke, and Mosse, for certain considerations set 
forth, — " did grant, bargain, sell, and confirm to 
James, Lord Stanley and Strange, his heirs, &c, the 
manor of West Derby, and the town or towns of 
Wavertree, and Everton, to have and to hold for 
ever." 

The said Lord Stanley, in the 17th Charles L, 
anno 1642, did, some time in the month of 
" November of that year, appoint a court baron 
to be kept in and for the said manors and towns, (Sir 
Richard Molyneux, Bart., being then the steward.) 
At which court it was found, that Everton paid for 
their enclosed lands £5 lis. 3|-d. per annum ; and 
for their commons, by the names of Hangfield, White- 
field, and Netherfield, 13s. 4d. per annum; and at 
every king's fifteen, 2s.* for the said commons. The 
said 13s. 4d. is called Breck Silver, and is entirely 
paid for their commons and open land (being part of 

* The nature of this tax is explained in the Appendix* 



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INTRODUCTION. 29 

the Breck) whereon the people of Kirkdale were per- 
mitted (whilst the land lay open and unenclosed) to 
put their cattle, paying to the township of Everton 
6s. Sd. per annum, for such privilege and advan- 
tages. 

In the 18th Charles II., anno 1667, Charles, 
1667. . . 

* Earl of Derby, heir to the said Lord Stanley," 

in consequence of divers debates and differences, 
touching the fines due to the said earl from his copy- 
hold tenants of Everton, entered into an agreement 
with Robert Carter and William Halsall, who were 
deputed by the copyholders of Everton to treat for 
themselves and others, about a composition to be paid 
to the said earl in consideration of settling their fines 
for all times to come. In this agreement, which is 
dated 1st January, 1667, amongst other things, it 
was stipulated, "That the said copyholders should 
pay to the said earl twelve years' rent of their ancient 
yearly rents, as mentioned in a schedule thereto 
annexed, and should permit the said earl to enclose 
one-third part of their common to him and his heirs 
for ever ; and the said earl agreed, for himself and his 
heirs, to settle and confirm by decree of chancery, &c, 
their copyhold rents certain for all time to come ; and 
that they, the said copyholders, should enjoy the 
herbage of the other two-thirds of their said commons 
left open and uninclosed, to them and their heirs for 
ever. To which articles many of the copyholders 
agreed ; and afterwards, other articles were entered 
into, including the residue of the said tenants : but 



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30 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

lest it should be thought or intended by any of said 
copyholders, that the said articles did include all the 
three towns as one manor,* and thereby render their 
ancient rents and privileges general and promiscuous, 
it is thereby expressly declared, that the said copy- 
holders do for themselves, severally and respectively, 
(and not jointly the one for the other,) and for their 
several and respective heirs, §&, covenant, promise, 
grant, and agree to and mth the said earl, fyc. ; and 
the said earl doth hereby agree and covenant, that 
Ins trustee or trustees shall agree with and grant to 
the said copyholders, parties to these presents, and 

* Notwithstanding the ancient inhabitants of Everton were thus care- 
ful to record their manorial independence, and freedom from the incor- 
porate rale or dominion of the manor of West Derby ; and notwithstand- 
ing this agreement of and with the said Earl of Derby clearly allows, 
declares, and establishes the separate, distinct, and individual manorial 
rights and privileges of Everton; yet, according to modern usage, in 
the halmote-court, the township of Everton is implicitly denominated 
" within the manor of West Derby ; " — as may be seen in any copy of 
surrender of Everton copyhold lands, all which, of such modern sur- 
renders, are headed thus :— " The manor of West Derby (to wit) the 
halmote-court of Bamber Gascoyne, Esq., (now of the Marquis Salis- 
bury) lord of the manor of West Derby aforesaid, in the county of Lan- 
caster, held at West Derby aforesaid, for the said manor, according to 
the custom thereof, &c." And in the bodies of such surrenders inva- 
riably will be found the following passage; "a piece or parcel of land, 
being in Everton, within 'the manor of West Derby aforesaid." In the 
ancient deed of 1549, as given in the Appendix, it is stated, that the sur- 
render there alluded to had been " granted and acknowledged according 
to the custom of the manor of West Derby ; but it does not state, as 
modern surrenders do, that Everton is within the manor of West Derby : 
but the point may be reconciled, and perhaps settled, by taking the fact 
thus; — that Everton is a manor within a manor; that Everton is one of 
the six berewicks, or manors, named in Doomsday-book, in a passage, 
of which the following is a copy or abstract, from that book, — " In the 
hundred of West Derbie, the king, Edward the Confessor, had one 
manor, called Dcrbic, with 6 berewicks, (manors within manors,) &c." 



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INTRODUCTION. 31 

their heirs respectively, that for or notwithstanding 
any name or thing herein before mentioned and 
agreed upon, the said copyholders respectively, their 
heirs and assigns, shall have the same liberty, free- 
dom, and privilege in the said two parts of the said 
waste and common, remaining to their respective 
copyholds, as they held, used, and enjoyed before the 
making of these presents on the whole as by the said 
articles, and the said Robert Carter, and "William 
Halsall, bound for the said earl, and the said earl's 
receipt for the money paid, may more at large appear." 
" In pursuance of which said articles, and agreeable 
to the true sense and meaning thereof, the said earl, 
or his successor, William, Earl of Derby, did enclose 
and lease to his tenants at West Derby, one-third 
part of their commons,* and to Wavertree, and to 
Everton, each one-third part of their commons, which 
said enclosures of Everton amounted to sixty acres; 
and there remained open, or unenclosed, one hundred 
and twenty acres, being the other two-thirds of said 
commons, as by the survey at the time of the said 
enclosing may appear." 

All of a seignor or lord's rights and privileges, in 
and over the township and manor of Everton, re- 
mained vested in the successive Earls of Derby, from 
this period down to the decease of William George 
Richard, Earl of Derby, which event took place 
"" in the year 1 702 : the said earl then dying with- 
out leaving male issue, the major part of the titles, 

* MS. of Seacomc. 



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32 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

dignities, and estates of which he was possessed, at 
the time of his decease, became vested in another 
branch of the Stanley family ; but to his only surviving 
child and heiress, Henrietta Maria, Baroness of Ash- 
burnham, descended all his estates and honours which 
were not under those unjust and arbitrary restrictions 
of the law, which may be truly denominated saliqae. 

It has been already shewn that the township of 
Everton contains, as near as may be, 310 acres of 
land. Of these, 130 acres were anciently enclosed, and 
60 acres were enclosed about the year 1668, leaving 
120 acres in common, or waste. In the year 
* 1 716, the trustees of Lady Ashburaham granted 
a lease for 1000 years of 115 acres (which were part 
of the last-named 120 acres) of common land, unto 
certain individuals, the copyholders of Everton, for 
the consideration of £115 money in hand paid down 
by the said copyholders ; and on condition of the said 
copyholders continuing annually to pay the sum of 
£5 15s., being one shilling per acre on the lands so 
leased, for and during the entire term and continu- 
ance of the said lease, paying as well also 13s. 4d. 
annually, being the ancient rent or Breck-silver paid 
by the copyholders for said commons; and it may 
have been understood that this 13s. 4d. should con- 
tinue to be paid for the five acres of common land 
not included in the lease of 115 acres, inasmuch as 
there were originally 120 acres. Thus it is shewn, 
there are in Everton about 190 acres of freehold 
and copyhold lands; 115 acres of leasehold lands; 



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. INTRODUCTION. 33 

and some 5 acres of land not particularly included 
under any head; which 5 acres, it is probable, are the 
mere and its banks, and some very small patches 
that have been disposed of by the township to various 
individuals, as the books of the township show, and 
some very trivial spots or patches yet remaining, and 
which are called " land belonging to the township." 
This total of 310 acres very nearly agrees with the 
measurement of the township, as taken in the year 
1 790 ; as may be seen in the map of that time. 

The completion of the lease, in 1716, of the said 
115 acres of land, forms a conspicuous feature in the 
history of Everton, In consequence of that lease, 
nearly all the remaining waste lands of the township 
were apportioned, allotted off, enclosed, and much 
improved, for agricultural and other purposes. Be- 
fore, however, the division or allotment of the lands 
of the said lease was earned fully into effect, it was 
discovered that some of the lands included in that 
lease belonged to, or were in the township of, West 
Derby ; and on such discovery, various debates and 
disputes arose, and sundry meetings took place to 
adjust such differences. 

Eventually, a final settlement of the disputed points 
was effected, on the 23d June, 1723; the particulars 
of which settlement, and many other interesting docu- 
ments touching the 1000 years' lease, the apportion- 
ment and allotment of the several parts of the lands 
so leased, and other matter thereto belonging, will be 
found in the Appendix. 

r> 



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34 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

The settlement effected in 1723, seems to have 
set at rest all differences and disputes between Everton 
and West Derby; and ever since that period, the 
manorial affairs of those respective townships or 
manors appear to have been amicably transacted at 
one and the same place, when needful, that is, in the 
lord of the manor's court, at West Derby, agreeable 
to certain forms, customs, &c, as will be shewn in a 
forthcoming section. 

It would appear that the manorial rights, privileges, 
&c, in and over the township or manor of Everton, 
remained vested in the heirs of the Derby family 
* until, in the year 1717, Isaac Greene, Esquire, 
a respectable solicitor of Liverpool, purchased those 
rights, privileges, and emoluments, together with 
those of the manors of West Derby, and Wavertree. 

Mr, Greene was also proprietor, or lord, of other 
manors, some of which were acquired by purchase, 
and others were the heritage of his wife, Mary Aspin- 
wall, the heiress of Sir Gilbert Ireland. 

On the death of Mr. Greene (which took 
'place the 5th July, 1749,) his possessions be- 
came the property of his daughters and co-heiresses, 
Mrs. Blackburn, of Hale, and Mrs. Gaseoyne, of 
Childwall; by whom and their heirs the manorial 
rights of all the late Mr Greene's manors were and 
still are exercised, and the copyhold courts continue, 
under them, to be duly held, with all the formalities 
of that system. 

Everton became the property of Maiy, the daughter 



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INTRODUCTION. 35 

of the late Isaac Greene, Esquire, who married Bam- 
ber Gascoyne, of Barking, in Essex, Esquire, and 
M. P., by whom she had two sons ; to the eldest of 
whom, the late Bamber Gascoyne, of Childwall, 
Esquire, (who for many years was M.P. for Liverpool,) 
the manors of West Derby, Everton, and Wavertree 
descended; the younger of those sons is the very 
worthy General Isaac Gascoyne, the present M. P. 
for Liverpool. 

The elder Bamber Gascoyne, Esquire, died 

* 8th May, 1 799; and the younger, or late, Bam- 
ber Gascoyne, Esquire, died 16th January, 1824; 
the wife of the latter died 11th July, 1820. 

On the death of the late Bamber Gascoyne, 

* Esquire, the manors of West Derby, Everton, 
&c, devolved to his daughter, and only surviving 
child, who married the Marquis of Salisbury; and the 
manorial rights, &c, of Everton have, in consequence 
of the marriage, become vested in that noble family. 

Having brought the history of the seignorage and 
soil of the township or manor of Everton through 
times of peril as well as of peace ; from rude, remote, 
and tyrannical times, to these days of happy tran- 
quillity, and of real, permanent, and substantial secu- 
rity ; it is hoped it will not be deemed an unpardon- 
able step, to introduce a slight digression; prefacing 
such digression with a fervent congratulation to the 
present inhabitants of Everton, that civilization and 
widely-diffused knowledge have created for them this 
era of happiness, security, and content ! 



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30 HISTORY OP EVERTON. 

It is more than probable that, in days of yore, many 
a warlike phalanx has been seen from Everton, to 
wend its hostile way to conflicts which have carried 
slaughter, devastation, and even desolation into neigh- 
bouring lands and habitations ; and from the humble 
dwellings of the people of Everton, of ancient days, 
in all likelihood, have the youthful male inmates been 
marched to death or mutilation ; for vassalage was the 
lot of all who, in remote ages, called this township 
their home. At their lord's bidding, all able-bodied 
vassals Avere necessitated to march wherever war's 
horrid operations or ambition's purposes called them ; 
change of masters came with change of years ; biit 
it amounts almost to a certainty, that submission and 
misery were, for centuries on centuries, under all 
changes of times, of rulers, and of lords, the continued 
doom of the ancient inhabitants of Everton, whether 
as Brigantes, Anglo-Romans, Anglo-Saxons, Anglo- 
Danes, or Anglo-Normans. Hard and bitter was 
their lot; but fervent thanks are due to an all- wise 
and kind Providence, for the civilization and wide- 
spreading knowledge of the present day, which con- 
stitute our moral, social, and political shields, by 
which we are defended from aggression and oppres- 
sion. How long it may please the Ruler of events 
to suffer us to remain in this happy, secure, and 
enviable state, is wisely sealed up in the book of futu- 
rity. In recent, as well as remote times, how many 
untoward circumstances have we not, as a nation, 
valiantly overcome, and how fortunate have been the 



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INTRODUCTION. 37 

results of endeavours, the probability of the success of 
which was fearfully against us. The career of that 
child of ambition has but lately closed, who was the 
dread and the scourge of Europe, and who extended 
his eagle eye to the subjugation of the world, but 
fixed it most intently and eagerly on the conquest of 
our matchless island. At the commencement of the 
present century, vehicles were seen parading the 
township of Everton, prepared to convey the females, 
the helpless, the aged, and the young, of these parts, 
to shelter and safety in the interior of the kingdom, if 
necessary, on the threatened invasion of Bonaparte. 
Let us for a moment suppose that those designs of the 
ruler of France had been carried into execution, and 
to successful completion, might not then the injustice, 
cruelties, and oppressions of the Norman William 
have been again enacted, and have constituted our 
misery' at the present day ? 

It boots not now to argue on present safety, or on the 
machinations of that individual, who at one time was 
mighty both in fame and power ; but to whom do we 
owe thanks for the possession of the one, and deliver- 
ance from the other? to whom is the praise due? 
Truly to those who, under the Almighty's permission, 
stood firmly at their posts; who, although harassed by 
a murmuring multitude at home, and deserted by 
foreign powers, resolutely employed the nation's ener- 
gies, and effected, not only a full and complete de- 
fence, but the utter discomfiture and downfall of that 
being, who, though now inanimate and harmless, often 



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38 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

struck awe and terror into the rulers of many mighty 
nations, populous and proud as our own Britain ; and 
freed the world from his tyranny, and gave peace to 
Europe. But Providence has now heen pleased to 
seat us, apparently at least, permanently on the rock 
of safety ; and on Everton, in particular, it has long 
heen bestowing much influx of population, and great 
encrease of value. There are no Tosti's now ; our 
suits and services to the lords of our manor are 
scarcely more than nominal, little other than mere 
matters of form; so trifling indeed, that they are 
annually bought off for the value of that humble coin 
of the realm — a groat : nay, many extensive portions 
of land in Everton are now in free-holding, liberated 
altogether from even a liability to feudal customs, 
and in no respect under the control of any lord, but 
that individual who, by purchase, or other legal mode, 
has become the proprietor in fee and perpetuity. 



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SECTION II. 



ETYMOLOGY. 



A section on the etymology of the name of a place 
under consideration is generally deemed indispensably 
necessary, as well in an humble local historical trea- 
tise, as in the histories of proud empires. But it may 
be said there are few sciences, or employments, more 
abstruse, or more involved in ambiguity and obscurity, 
than that of etymology, or the art of deriving the origin 
of names — names that are in themselves often nothing 
other than altered and changed obselete terms, and 
very frequently meliorated, both in pronunciation and 
orthography, so as to chime in, and accord with, the 
amended idioms of enlightened times, or, in other 
words, to suit the current language of improving ages. 
It will scarcely be denied that often, after a tedious 
etymological research, and a conclusion has been 
arrived at, — however veracious such conclusion may 
appear to be, — the reward of the discovery has seldom 
equalled the value of the time expended on the en- 
quiry. The study or science of etymology has not a 
truer type than the game of blind-man-buff; for in 
such study we stroll, hoodwinked, through the laby- 



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40 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

rintliiaii chambers of antiquity, eagerly catcliing at 
the data we chance to stumble upon, yet seldom 
giving the right appellation or construction to the 
matter occasionally obtained ; we are, therefore, both 
by the rules of blind-man-buff, and those of etymo- 
logy, again obliged to resume our efforts, and recom- 
mence our search. Nor would it be a less appropriate 
name, were we to style etymology, guessology; for it is 
a system, science, or pursuit bound and kept together 
by a chain of conjectures, and a series of guesses. 

But to pass by etymological enquiry altogether 
would be to sin against the rules of history ; slender, 
therefore, as the data are, touching the etymology of 
the name of Everton, and however imperfect the 
mode of its presentation, it must be advanced and 
submitted to the reader's notice. It has often been 
declared, and with much shew of truth, that the broad 
pronunciation of country people is nearest to the 
ancient Saxon phraseology used in England; the 
time sound, and the original meaning, of the names of 
places, are therefore more likely to be gathered from 
the lips of the unlearned, than from any writings of 
old date ; as may be briefly proved by stating u case 
thus : — Let an educated person visit a tribe in Africa, 
and take down their words in wilting, as the sound in 
utterance dictates ; those who read aloud such written 
words seldom, if ever, give to them their true pronun- 
ciation. Thus has it been with our rude, unlettered 
ancestors ; their names of places have been written 
down by learned clerks, and people of following ages 



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ETYMOLOGY. 41 

have given to such names, in many cases, a false pro- 
nunciation, which has led to altered orthography. 

From the frequent use made of the word " Yerton," 
by the inhabitants of Everton and its vicinage, in 
times not remote, and even still by very aged per- 
sons, when speaking of and meaning Everton, it 
would almost appear that the true and original name 
of the township had been Yerton; but it is acknow- 
ledged that the word Yerton may be a corruption of, or 
derivation from, the word Hiretun (higher-town), or 
Oureton (over-town), and indeed have the same 
meaning, for to both or either of these words the pro- 
nunciation of Yerton is nearly allied. But to wade 
deeply into an etymological enquiry on the word Yerton 
would be as profitless as tedious ; it will be better, 
then, at once to take that word as synonymous with, 
or a derivation from, the word Hiretun. In the Dooms- 
day Book, the township is styled Hiretun ; a name 
given to it, there is reason to presume, from the cir- 
cumstance of its having been formerly (as now) the 
liigher of one or more towns, in its own immediate 
vicinage : and to this conclusion every mind would, 
at once, be satisfactorily brought, if any evidence 
were adduced that, at the time Everton was named 
Hiretun, there were in reality one or more towns in 
its immediate neighbourhood, built or standing on a 
lower site than the town, or township,* of Everton 
itself. It woidd not be very difficult to establish the 

* Of tojvnsTiips f Everton is, and ever has been, the highest on the east, 
west, and north of those which are in its immediate vicinage. 






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42 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

assumption of the former existence of such lower 
town or towns ; one, for instance, may have possibly 
existed in Kirkdale, and another, probably, on or 
very near the site of the present town of Liverpool ; 
for we find that all ancient localities, the names of 
which terminate in " tun " or " tune," have been 
towns. Why not, then, let fancy proceed a step, 
and say, that " dune " also signifies a town, — that 
"Esmedune" may have been Esme-fo;ra, — and that 
modern Liverpool stands on the site of old Esmedune.* 
If either or both of these assumed towns existed, they 
were situated below Everton. From such a circum- 
stance the name of Hiretun (higher-town) must have 
had its origin, and the still familial- word Yerton, is 
doubtless a corruption of it. 

To account for the more polished, yet neither more 
significant nor more appropriate name, which the 
township now bears, we may, with a further trifling 
flight of fancy, suppose the alteration of Hiretun, or 
Yerton, to Ever-ton, to have been made by some 
ancient learned clerk, who, instigated by fancied 
wisdom, or by whim, thought to amend the language 
of his times. Such an one may have deemed Yerton 
a vulgar name, and, with more of rhyme than reason, 
he may have created for the township its present 
appellation. There is, however, no information ex- 



* It belongs to the history of Liverpool to treat more at large on this 
point; but it would appear there are good grounds to establish the 
opinion that the sites of Liverpool and the once-existing Esmedune are 
one and the same. 



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ETYMOLOGY. 43 

tant to prove how or when originated the name which 
Everton now bears. 

The township bore the name of Hiretun at the close 
of the rule of the Anglo-Saxons, as that ancient and 
celebrated territorial register, the Doomsday Book, 
clearly shews • but let us, for a moment, suppose that 
ever is a corrupt pronunciation of hire, there has been 
bad taste displayed, and sin committed on sense, in 
giving such an incongruous title to the township ; a 
title indelibly stamped on its records. In fine, cus- 
tom has now irrevocably established "Everton" to 
be the township's name. 

Let us, however, for another moment, suppose hire 
to mean ever, — such cannot have been what is termed 
an etymon ; for though, as in the present case, it may 
imply the township's existence in and from remote 
antiquity, yet reason instructs us that custom only 
has established its present name of Ever ; and that, 
even if the word hire means ever, it is dis-use that has 
buried the original name of the township in oblivion. 
But it is most reasonable to conclude, that all etymo- 
logical enquiries touching the word Everton, must 
result in the decision of its being a corruption of the 
word Hiretun ; and so far as reason and analogy can 
guide, it may be permitted us to believe, and even 
to be convinced, that the ancient (and oldest known) 
name of the township, Hireton, was given to the place 
in consequence of the circumstance of its being the 
higher of one or more towns near unto itself. 

There are some who maintain that the word ever has 



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44 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

been derived from heifer, in consequence of Everton 
having possessed commons, in which many heifers 
depastured. Others, again, would derive the word 
ever from heather, or according to broader, or Scotch 
pronunciation, hether. These latter build their hypo- 
thesis on the once existing superabundance of heath 
which spread itself over the commons or wastes of the 
township. These two last-named points are merely 
introduced to shew on what slender data an etymo- 
logist can build. There are those now living who 
perfectly recollect Everton-hill being dubbed, by the 
common people, with the sobriquet, Dunnock-hrow; 
a name given to it, without doubt, in consequence of 
the brown or dun appearance of the place, when, in 
days of yore, nothing but scanty crops of herbage 
covered its commons. Lucidly, however, the township 
has escaped from the confirmation, by custom and 
long usage, of such a vulgar name; and yet, num- 
berless towns owe their established cognomens to 
circumstances as slight as did Everton its nick-name 
of dunnock, or dun-looking brow. 

After all, this section on etymology strongly re- 
sembles Matthews' story of the old Scotch woman; 
in which much is said about nothing. Here then let 
the matter rest; let us be content to know that the 
township has a name, a good name, and an old one ; 
but, "what is" there in a name P" Everton would be 
(as is said of the rose) as lovely to look on, as sweet, 
and as salubrious as it now is, even though it had 
any other name. 



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SECTION III. 



ANTIQUITIES. 



There are no architectural erections of high anti- 
quity now remaining in Everton. The cottage, 
styled "Prince Rupert's head-quarters/' stands the 
first on the list of Everton's remaining ancient edifices, 
and, having heen the residence of that prince, is 
stamped with some celebrity. 

This cottage possessed many advantages, as the 
residence of a leader of forces attacking Liverpool. 
At the period of its siege by Prince Rupert, in the 
year 1644, it was not altogether a despicable place 
for even a general officer to reside in ; an assertion, 
that will have less chance of being disputed, when it 
is brought to mind that, in the early parts of the 
seventeenth century, the dwellings of the greatest in 
the land were lamentably deficient in those elegancies, 
accommodations, and luxuries which are now so 
general, and even common. As a soldier, there is 
little doubt, the prince found this cottage a far more 
comfortable, and in every respect preferable, place of 
temporary residence, than would have been a frail, 
thin tent ; there is, therefore, reason to suppose that 



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48 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

lie did not repine at the scanty accommodation it 
afforded. Leaders of legions, in these days, would 
not, perhaps, be contented with even a much better 
temporary domicile ; but matters are not now as they 
were heretofore. 

Rupert's Cottage stands on the crest of Everton- 
hill, at the south east angle, or upper extremity of the 
south side, of a road or street called Everton Brow j 
the cottage however fronts to a road or street called 
the Village. It is in the S. W. district, and may be 
found on the map annexed to this volume, in that 
division of property, or locality, which is marked and 
distinguished thereby the figure 1, and letter m. 

There is nothing remarkable in the structiu*e of 
this cottage, its workmanship and materials being of 
the rudest classes ; it is a long, low, single-stoned, 
rectangular-shaped edifice, about five yards in width 
at the east end, and some half-a-yard wider at the 
west end ; its extreme length is about 20 yards ; the 
whole of its exterior is composed of rude unchiselled 
stone, and shilly,* cemented together with lime-mor- 
tar generally, but in some parts with clay ; the whole 
is washed over with white-lime ; the roof is of thatch; 
the rafters which support the roof are of oak, bare 
and black with age ; clay has been daubed over the 
inner walls instead of plaster, and, although the pre- 
sent occupiers are cleanly people, the materials of 

* Shilly is small rubble and flaky parts of stone, such as is generally 
cast aside, when large compact masses of stone are sought for, from 
quarries. 



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ANTIQUITIES, 49 

which the cottage is constructed scarcely admit of 
any approaches heing made within it towards neat- 
ness ; the floors are of clay, partially tiled ; cellaring 
there is none; nor is there an excavation of any kind 
into its site, or foundation, as it is solid rock. 

At no remote period, the exterior rock, which once 
lay at the north side of the cottage, has been cut 
down and removed, to depress the space it occupied 
to the level of the road, w r hich causes the building to 
be elevated, or perched on a rock, some few feet 
higher than the street; but out of the rock rude 
steps have been roughly hewed, by which its two 
northern doors are approached. 

There was formerly a small closet projecting towards 
the road, about mid-way on the north front of this 
cottage ; it was taken down some twenty years ago ; 
the long chimney has also been much reduced in 
length. On the east, the cottage abuts on a bam of 
reddish- coloured free-stone, which is of tolerable anti- 
quity, though not, perhaps, of a date quite so ancient 
as the cottage itself. 

The interior of the cottage consists of four apart- 
ments, which serve for the domicile of two families. 
From the window of the west gable a beautiful pros- 
pect is obtained, quite exhilarating to the tenant, a 
tailor, who has fixed his work-board under it, from 
whence he can feast his eye whenever he is dis- 
posed. 

The next, in rank, of Everton's remaining antiqui- 

E 



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50 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

ties, is a cottage in the village, on a site which is 
distinguished in the map by the figures 55, and the 
letter a. Tliis cottage belongs to, and was, until a 
few years ago, long the residence of, a family named 
Anderton. In respectability of appearance it is supe- 
rior to, and most likely, in point of antiquity, nearly, 
if not quite, on a par with, its more favoured neigh- 
bour, the temporary palace of a scion of our royal race. 

The exterior of Anderton's cottage is a compound 
of stone, clay, and solid timber \ the timber is dove- 
tailed together, in many places, forming a frame-work, 
the cavities or interstices of which are filled up with 
clay, or lime-mortar. This mode of building was 
very generally practised in Lancashire a century or 
two ago. The timber used in the construction of this 
building is good English oak, ponderous, and still 
sound and strong, and calculated to vie in endurance 
with the stone, of which many other parts of the cot- 
tage are constructed ; the roof is tiled now, but was 
formerly thatched. Of the interior of this cottage 
nothing is required to be stated ; its inmates are hum- 
ble, and their domestic economy the reverse of elegant. 
There are many who would not consider time altoge- 
ther mispent, whilst employed in reading descriptions 
of splendid apartments and gaudy canopies; but few 
indeed are they who would cast a moment away in 
perusing a dissertation on a tailor's or shoemaker's 
internal domestic economy. 

Adjoining Anderton's cottage, stands a pile of 



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ANTIQUITIES. 51 

buildings, formerly the property and residence of a 
family of Everton nobles, named Rice ; of whom more 
hereafter. It is now about twenty years since the 
external and internal parts of this residence were 
much improved and modernized; the good taste of 
the lady who was for some years its tenant was judi- 
ciously displayed in the direction of the improvements 
and alterations, by which a farmer's homely domestic 
establishment was converted into an elegant domicile ; 
and although, at this time, a little of the exterior 
polish is worn away, the owner of the place, Mrs. 
Tatlock, finds it a charming abode. 

With the road intervening, but nearly opposite to 
the last noticed dwelling, in the S. E., stands another 
cottage, on a lot marked 22, f, on the map ; this still 
humble villa has latterly been trimmed up into a 
spruce place of residence, and, compared with its 
ancient cottage neighbours, makes quite a superior 
and modern appearance. The metamorphosis in the 
appearance of this place has been recently effected ; 
for, a few years ago, it had a rude and ragged resem- 
blance to those old, ruinous, and ill-kept residences, 
or homesteads, where indolent agriculturalists reside. 
This building was erected the same year (1644) in 
which Prince Rupert besieged the town of Liver- 
pool. 

Another cottage, two stories in height, constructed 
of red stone, in the year 1688, is also standing in 
Everton village, on the south-east part of the lot 



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52 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

marked 19, a; it was built by some branch of the 
Heyes' family, and was probably once their place of 
residence ; of whom also more will be hereafter stated. 
Fifty years ago, there dwelt at this cottage a worthy 
matron, to whose care, kindness, and skill, many 
individuals, now happy, healthy, and prosperous 
denizens of Liverpool, and other places, are in- 
debted, under the Almighty's favour, for the lease, 
of life which they now enjoy. Many a puny, puling, 
sickly child was entrusted to her well-known capa- 
bility as a foster-mother, who, with kindness, attention, 
and fidelity, constantly performed every duty of her 
trust. Worthy creature ! worth such as thine must 
be a passport to celestial joys, and thy soul is now 
enjoying peace and bliss in heaven ; whilst on earth, 
so long as these humble annals endure, thy name, 
deserving Mary Mercer, shall stand recorded. 

Extending in a line of some 50 yards, east and 
west, there is a pile of buildings on the north side of 
the path over the precipitous road, at the upper part 
of JEverton Brow. These buildings are about fifty 
paces distant north of the Bridewell, or Round-jug of 
Everton; most of them were erected in and about the 
year 1092, and are in a tolerable state of preservation, 
but present no feature worthy of remark, beyond the 
brief notice of their being a set of larger kind of cot- 
tages, two stories high, and tolerably roomy ^within ; 
the spot where these buildings stand is marked 62, a, 
on the map. The westernmost of these domiciles has 



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ANTIQUITIES, 53 

long been Mrs. Coopers manufactory for that luscious 
compound of sweets, whose excellence is celebrated 
far and near, under the name of Everton toffee. At 
the east part of this pile of buildings is a butcher's 
shop, where considerable business is done ; and was 
for many years past, until lately, the only shambles 
in the township. 

There is another dwelling now standing in the 
township, near the village, on the lot marked 1, o, on 
the map 5 the exact time of its erection is not known. 
Such is also the case with the remains of another 
ancient dwelling, forming a sort of abutment to, or 
dub-down from, the house erected by the late Doctor 
Gleave, on the lot marked 42, d, in Everton-lane. 
Both these places, as w r ell as another ancient dwelling 
which stood, not long ago, on the St. Domingo land, 
on the lot marked 2, i, were built prior to the year 
1700; as was also the old part of the Odd-house, 
which stands on locality 21, d. To the last-named 
house, some additions and improvements have been 
lately made. Of ancient architectural erections, those 
already noticed are all which now remain in Everton 
of the dwellings constructed in the township during 
and prior to the seventeenth century. 

These are certainly humble edifices, and this brief 
account of them, to some persons, may appear 
superfluous; but however insignificant such places 
may be in this age of splendour, yet they were, in 
their day, the residences of the chief and most sub- 



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54 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

stantial families of the township, and at the time in 
which they were constructed, there were few, if any, 
extensive buildings in their vicinage. To know that 
these lowly dwellings were once the abodes of worthy, 
substantial, and respectable persons, is sufficient to 
entitle them to a notice here ; if the persons who occu- 
pied them were not deeply* versed in the Belle Lettres, 
or members of the Beau-monde, yet as honest, pains- 
taking, pious, and moral people, who, in their days, 
earned respect, they are now, as they will be in after- 
time, worthy of recollection and notice. 

Whatever may have been the style in which do- 
mestic residences were built at Everton in early days, 
it is pretty evident, from the specimens already given, 
that the dwellings, even of the nobles of the township, 
were insignificant in size, and incommodiously con- 
structed. Soon after the commencement of the 
eighteenth century, however, the houses of Everton as- 
sumed a resj^ectable appearance ; they were of larger 
dimensions, and more commodiously planned, being 
generally two, and occasionally three, stories high; 
yet even at that time, the apartments of these dwel- 
lings were low, unseemly to the sight, and detri- 
mental to health ; but great improvement was made 
in the exterior appearances. In fine, although they 
were not what a more refined taste would have made 
them, yet they were spacious, and sufficiently conve- 
nient to content the wealthiest individuals of the town- 
ship, and many of the opulent of Liverpool, who 



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ANTIQUITIES. 55 

frequently flocked there to reside. But it was re- 
served for our times to polish and embellish tins 
beautiful township, by giving to its architectural erec- 
tions their highest finish, and by tastefully forming 
delightful gardens and pleasure grounds. Everton is 
now studded over with elegant mansions, chiefly the 
residence of persons, who, although opulent, still take 
pleasure in trade's transactions, or deem it a duty 
they owe their families, to continue their daily toil in 
the commercial operations of Liverpool, that they may 
increase their store ; profiting, at the same time, by 
wholesome walks to and from that busy town, inhaling 
during their meal-hours the pure and salubrious air 
of Everton ; where they also pass their peaceful and 
happy evenings and nights, removed from the town's 
murky, noxious exhalations, and from trade's arduous 
exertions and incessant hum. 

It remains now to take notice of such architectural 
erections as were standing in Everton within the 
recollection of the oldest persons now living. The 
first and chief in consideration was, unquestionably, 
the one always known, and still remembered, by the 
name of 



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56 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 



THE BEACON. 




This miniature architectural specimen was the only 
memento of the days of auld lang syne, and, indeed, 
almost the only ancient public edifice that tradition 
can vouch to have ever existed at Everton : it is to be 
hoped, therefore, that a somewhat elaborate account 
of the building itself, and of matter connected with it, 
will not only be deemed pardonable, but acceptable. 

The ancient beacon of Everton stood near, if not 
on the very spot, where the wall of the east end of the 
.church of St. George now stands. Gregson, in his 
Fragments of Lancashire, says, "The ancient Fire 
Beacon of Everton was standing a few years ago," but 
it presented evident marks of decay ; if not built at 
an earlier date, by some other person, it was probably 
built about anno 1220, by Ranulph Blundeville, Earl 
of Chester, who erected Beeston Castle, which is 
visible from the site of the late Everton Beacon. * * * 
Possessed of considerable property in the vicinage, it 
is most likely Ranulph would not neglect to build a 
range of beacons," &c. 



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ANTIQUITIES. 57 

With submission it is hinted here, that Mr. Gregson 
has grounded his argument, as to the founder or builder 
of this beacon, on erroneous surmises. Gregson pro- 
ceeds to say, " Beacons were objects of much attention 
during the threatened invasion of Spain, tempo Queen 
Elizabeth; and that at Everton was considered useful 
during the late war." The last sentence is evidently 
erroneous, the old beacon at Everton was not used 
during the late war, being altogether destroyed in the 
year 1803 : but during the late war, in the year 1804, 
a signal station was established by government, at a 
few paces distant,, on the south, from the site of the 
late old beacon. This station occupied a space of 
about 500 square yards, on which stood a low wood- 
built cottage, a garden, and a telegraph.* 

Mr. Gregson perhaps was not aware that some per- 
sons were of opinion that the late Everton beacon was 
erected during the time the Spanish Annada was 
expected to arrive on the coast of Britain. It is not 
intended to offer any absolute opinion on such sur- 
noise ; but the description of the beacon, hereafter to 
be given, may lead readers to their own conclusions : 
it is however pretty certain that the late beacon of 
Everton was not built prior to the year 132 7 j for 
Rees, in his Cyclopedia, under the head "beacon," 
states,- "that before the time of Edward III., beacons 
were but stacks of wood, to be fired on the appearance 

* About the same period (1804), a beacon of faggots was constructed 
on the south side of Walton Cop ; but some mischievous person or per- 
sons set fire to the beacon, which consumed it, some months after it 
was constructed. 



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58 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

of ail enemy ; but in Edward's reign, pitched boxes 
were set up, instead of beacons of sticks." 

The following memoranda were drawn up from a 
close, ocular inspection made of the late Everton 
beacon, in the year 1802. " On a fine afternoon, in 
December, 1802, two persons, fond of exploring an- 
cient structures, visited the beacon, which then stood 
about a quarter of a mile distant, due west, from the 
mere or watering place of Everton. 

"Of the exterior appearance of the beacon, at that 
time, the wood-cut, presented at the head of these 
remarks, will give a tolerably just idea 3 it was sketched 
on the spot, at the time the visit here treated of was 
made. As to the plate annexed, it is very nearly a 
copy of a drawing taken by an amateur — a friend of 
the late John Tarlton, Esq., — who took the sketch. 
purposely for Mr. Tarlton, some fifty years ago. 

"The beacon was a plain, square, stone edifice, or 
tower, two stories in height,* no way remarkable as 
to the style or solidity of its structure; it was of plain, 
homely masonry, and the stone of which it was built 
was of a dull reddish brown colour, such as is pro- 
cured on the spot, the site of the late beacon being 
a solid mass of the same kind of stone, as is, indeed, 
the greater part of the hill of Everton. A flight of 
narrow and inconvenient stone steps led to the upper 
apartment; and a similar flight to the flat roof, or 
terrace platform. There was only -one apartment on 

* Some accounts hare stated "three;" but such statement is erro- 
neous. 



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ANTIQUITIES. 59 

the basement story, the floor of which was of earth or 
clay, level with the surface of the field outside. In 
one comer was a dilapidated fire-place, connected 
with an ill-constructed chimney, so strait, that a 
poor boy, in his ascent, stuck fast, and was nearly 
suffocated with rubbish and dust ; he was extricated 
by' a part of the chimney being taken down. The 
cattle put to graze in the beacon-field, had free 
ingress and egress to and from the beacon. 

" Of the upper apartment, nothing eulogious can be 
stated ; its appearance was bare, cheerless, and dun- 
geon-like. On the walls of that apartment many 
initials, and indeed full length names, Avere chiselled; 
but none of celebrity. In the south-west corner of the 
roof, or terraced platform, was a large receptacle, or 
cistern, composed of stone and cement, intended 
originally for the reception of combustible matter, 
wherewith a sufficient light might be raised to give 
concerted signals of approaching danger to other 
stations. At the time of this visit (1802), a goose- 
berry-tree and a thorn-bush had found soil sufficient 
on the roof and ledging of the east wall to take root, 
and during many past summers were known to have 
flourished in the full vigour of vegetation. 

"The orifices, for the admission of light and air 
into the beacon, were little other than such casements 
as are found in cottages of old standing ; and to all 
appearance, for a considerable length of time previous 
to this visit, those openings had not had frame- work 



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60 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

of any kind in them — through those apertures the 
elements freely entered, and as freely retired." 

It is to he regretted that no actual measurement of 
the beacon took place at the visit of 1802, but one 
of the visiting party furnishes, from memory, the fol- 
lowing additional descriptive observations. "The 
exterior of the base, or foundation, of the late Everton 
beacon, was about 6 yards square, and its height some 
25 feet ; the greater part of the marks of decay which 
it presented, was evidently the work of neglect. On 
the south side, there was a large, long crack or chasm 
in the wall of the building, many stones w;ere much 
broken at most of the angles, and, in some places, it 
would almost appear that w r antonness or design had 
actually picked out entire stones. To such depreda- 
tions the building was freely exposed, it being in 
every respect open, unwatched, and unguarded." 

.The persons who furnished the above memoranda, 
were probably the last who visited the late Everton 
beacon, with views of observation, for, during a stormy 
night, in the early part of the year 1803, that ancient 
edifice was felled, or razed to the ground, and disap- 
peared almost as suddenly as Aladdin's magnificent 
palace. Rumour blazoned it forth, that the wind 
blew it down ; and if credit can be given to the man 
who said, " certain rats had eaten a ton of iron," it 
may be believed that the wind levelled the stone 
tower, or beacon of Everton. 

The marks of decay which the beacon presented, 



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ANTIQUITIES. 61 

in the year 1803, may not be altogether conclusive of 
its claim to very high antiquity, particularly when it 
is considered that it had long remained open, unte- 
nanted, and neglected, and exposed too, without shelter 
of any kind, to elemental storms, as well as to the 
depredations of mischievous idlers, and casual visitors. 
Considering these things, and bearing in mind that 
the beacon was of pigmy dimensions, and of compa- 
ratively slight structure, its erection can barely be 
supposed to have a claim to very remote antiquity. 

Marriages are said to have been solemnized in the 
beacon at the time the clergy were expatriated from 
Liverpool for their loyalty, during the civil w r ars be- 
tween Charles I. and his parliament. A watch-move- 
ment maker resided at the beacon, a short time after 
the year 1770; but the last person said to have been 
the beacon's tenant was an old cobbler, who dwelt 
there, under a host of inconveniences, in or about the 
year 1783; but what rent he paid, tradition sayeth 
not. The eye commanded a most picturesque and 
pleasing inland view from the roof of the late beacon ; 
nor was the sea-ward prospect from thence one jot 
inferior — from few stations indeed, far or wide, could 
a better be obtained. 

Having thus described and disposed of the beacon, 
a brief accotmt will be next entered upon, touching 
all ancient dwellings which have been demolished at 
Everton in late years. 

Two buildings, consisting of a house and outhouses, 



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62 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

stood, for a great length of time, at the distance of a 
few yards on the N. E. of the late beacon, which were 
destroyed by fire, on Shrove-Tuesday, in the year 
1 782 : during the conflagration, the flames, at times, 
communicated to the beacon. It i3 supposed they 
were set on fire by gipsies, who had bivouacked in a 
shed on the premises, and near to a stack of hay; 
though rumour, at one time, accused a man who, soon 
after or during the conflagration, for private reasons, 
absconded; but it was ultimately satisfactorily esta- 
blished that the suspected runaway was not the incen- 
diary. A family, of the name of Oldham, who made 
the place a summer residence, had, for some time 
previous to the calamity, remoYed.for the winter to 
their town-house, in Liverpool. Much of their furni- 
ture, hay, and .other valuables, was destroyed, but 
part of the property was saved, by the inhabitants of 
Everton and neighbouring places, who flocked to the 
spot on the alarm being given by a carter, who was 
passing the place soon after three o'clock in the morn- 
ing; the buildings were totally destroyed. 

The following is extracted from Gore's paper of 
14th February, 1782: — "Twenty pounds reward. 
Whereas a fire broke out early on Tuesday morning, 
12th instant, at the dwelling-house of Mr. Isaac 
Oldham, of Everton (at that time uninhabited); and 
there being strong reasons to suspect it was mali- 
ciously and wilfully set on fire by some person or per- 
sons unknown, the proprietors of the Liverpool Fire 
Office do offer a reward of twenty pounds to any 



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ANTIQUITIES. 63 

persons who will give information, by which the per- 
petrators of so outrageous a crime may he convicted 
and brought to justice. 

" Wm. Kemp, Secretary. 

"Fire Office, Castle-street, 13th February, 1782." 

Some time previous to their occupation by the Old- 
ham family, one of the buildings now alluded to had 
been, for a considerable time, a public-house, which the 
nobles of Everton, and others, long and staunchly pa- 
tronised, by holding frequent sittings in its white-limed 
chambers, and drinking deep " of its nut-brown ale." 

On the site of ground, where William Robinson, Esq* 
has erected two excellent dwellings, marked 58, a, on 
the map, formerly stood a cottage and outhouses. 
These were ancient erections, seated below the level of 
the present road, and, from their appearance, would 
have barely suited a small farmer, as a place of resi- 
dence. If report be true, an old woman long dwelt 
there, whose name and fame were eminent as an 
excellent compounder of cakes, and other tempting 
articles of confectionary. 

On the locality marked 50, 6, there stood a veiy 
ancient cottage, which long went by the name of the 
Throstle's Nest; to this cottage many outbuildings 
were attached. The stables, erected by the late 
George Roach, Esq., now stand on the spot formerly 
occupied by this cottage, which, to judge from external 
appearances, must have been the oldest dwelling of 
any that stood in the township, within the knowledge 
or recollection of the present existing race. It must 



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64 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

have been long an admirable place of residence, as to 
pure air and prospect, for it stood on the veiy summit 
of the hill, without let or hindrance of view before it ; 
the building itself was but humble-looking, though in 
better style, and affording more accommodation, than 
the cottage of Prince Rupert. 

On the lot marked 36, c, there was a cottage, 
which was taken down in the year 1784, and the 
house on its site (lately occupied by the Misses 
Paisley,) was then erected, by the late "William 
Harper, Esq. — a praise-worthy undertaking, and de- 
serving of record, as the meritorious act of a pros- 
perous son, whose filial affection instigated and 
determined him to erect a respectable, comfortable, 
and commodious dwelling for his aged parents. The 
last person who resided in the cottage was a butcher, 
who kept his stall at the place. 

Very near to the last-named place, in the west, on 
locality 36, 6, stood a long, low, cottage-like, white 
house, the last occupier of which was a worthy, though 
humble, disciple of Pomona and Flora; in other words, 
an honest old gardener, and, as he dubbed himself, 
a professor of botany, whose name was William 
Harrison. 

William's skill in the practical parts of his profes- 
sion was not above mediocrity, and, in its theoretical 
branches, was still further removed from perfection 3 
but he had some vanity, and in the course of time 
persuaded himself that he was a second Linnaeus. 
Urged on by self-conceit, he had the temerity to at- 



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ANTIQUITIES. 65 

tempt a course of botanical lectures. At the appointed 
time, having gathered together a number of open- 
mouthed auditors, the professor made his appearance, 
and with much self-complacency, after three emphatic 
hems ! commenced his lecture, which ran very nearly 
thus :- — * . 

"I must inform you, my friends, in the first place, 
that What we call botany, is nothing at all only the 
work that nature does for us in the fields and gardens. 
Now you will very naturally wish to know what na- 
ture is — and I will tell you. Nature, do you see, my 
good friends, nature is a sort of a — that is — hem ! — a 
— a — aye, nature, you must know is, as I was going 
to say, nature is — a — a — a something like — a kind 
of n' a-^-sort-en-a dang it ! my good fellows, na- 
ture is nature!" 

The ill suppressed titters of his audience alarmed 
poor lecturer Harrison's wits, and smothered his 
ideas y his capabilities floundered, he essayed to stam- 
mer out a few unintelligible sentences, but at length, 
covered with confusion, rushed from the forum, and 
was never afterward known to give lectures on botany. 

William Harrison's cottage also disappeared very 
shortly after its neighbour was demolished, and on, or 
very nearly on its site, are now an excellent house 
and garden grounds, the property of Doctor Brandreth, 
of Liverpool, and the residence of Rt. Benn, Esq., 
merchant, of the same place. This elegant though 
moderate sized villa was formed by Doctor Brandreth, 
out of an extensive range of stabling, which had been, 

F 



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66 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

in the first instance, constructed by the late William 
Harper, Esq., whose third surviving and youngest 
daughter the Doctor married. 

In the S. E., very near to the two last-named cot- 
tages, but on the opposite side of the road, stood an 
old dwelling, and a bam, on locality 1 7, d.* These 
places were taken down twenty-four years ago, by John 
Pyke, Esq., to whom they belonged, and who, at that 
time, erected the present handsome dwelling-house 
which occupies the whole of this lot : its space was so 
small, that the house and out-offices almost cover it. 

On the west front of the locality marked 50, a, 
about half a century ago, stood a very ancient small 
dwelling. One of the last, if not the very last tenant 
of which was an old woman, who died there. The 
careful old body had hoarded up some gold, which, 
rumour says, was found by a buxom young lass, with 
which she bought a husband ; but, alas ! she found 
that "wealth has wings," or, in other words, matters 
went ill with her during the remainder of her life. 

Another very ancient cottage stood in the village, 
on the locality 16, 6, which was taken down about 
twenty years since, and a very snug dwelling-house 
erected on its site, by the present owner, Mr. Richard 
Naylor, chief dairyman of the township,* who has 
since resided there. An inscription, carved on a stone 

* In many of the old maps there is an error hereabout ; in some of 
them, 17, d, is not delineated, the whole of that corner of land being 
given as the property of Mrs. Bennet, and marked 70, a ; but in reality, 
this 17, rf, is, and time out of mind has been, distinct property belonging 
still to the Pyke family. 



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ANTIQUITIES. 67 

inserted in the wall of that cottage, over the fire-place, 
gave the time of its erection 1650. 

At a creachy, ruinous hovel, in the close vicinity 
of the last-named cottage, a poor old woman long 
dwelt, who, on a pittance of some one shilling or 
eighteen-pence a week, contrived to keep body and 
soul together. There are such people still existing, 
but how they manage is an enigma. In the present 
case the circumstance was the more remarkable, the 
poor old woman being a slatternly dawdle ; but her 
neighbours were kind to her, as the following anecdote 
and colloquy will shew. 

A neighbour of poor old Molly s, one day called 
from the threshold of her door to inform the harmless 
creature that she had heated her oven, and if she 
wished to bake a potatoe pie in it for her dinner, she 
was welcome. "Bless you! aye, I should like it 
weel enough," replied Molly, "but I happen not to 
ha' a morsel o' flesh iW house to-day."* " O never 
mind that/' cried the kind neighbour, "come this 
way, an* I'll gi' ye pail 'n a nice bit o' pork I bought 
yesterday." "Weel, your vast good; but, now I 
think on't, I don't believe I've got a potatoe i'th' 
house." "That's no great matter nother; so come, 
Molly, and I'll gi' ye as many potatoes as will sarve." 
" Well, I'm sure you're vast good, an' so I'll set about 
it farrantly — but laws bless me ! I welly think I ha' 
not a dust o' flour for th' crust." " Well, to be sure ! " 
exclaimed the neighbour. " But never mind, Molly, 

* Literally the language used. 



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68 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

you sha'rit be disappointed, I'll gi' you as much flour 
as will sarve your turn this time; so hurry hither, 
•woman — 'prithee ma haste whiles th' oven's hot." 
Molly accordingly went over and received the meat, 
potatoes, and flour, to which was added a sprinkling 
of salt and pepper 3 but just as she was on the thresh- 
old of the neighbour's cottage, she suddenly stopped 
to inform her friend she had one want more, in short, 
she had not a dish to bake her pie in. Tins also was 
supplied; and thus poor Molly was furnished with 
every requisite, and with all the ingredients necessaiy, 
to fabricate her potatoe pie — for even as to water, that 
also her neighbour's pump supplied. Thus, in some 
degree, is solved the enigma, how such-like poor 
old creatures of small, aye and of large towns, con- 
trive to live. For the homeliness of all the circum- 
stances of this anecdote, the faithfulness of the picture 
of the language and manners of the last age must 
apologize. 

There was an ancient dwelling on the locality 
marked 48, 6, but it was taken down some fifty years 
ago, by the late Mr. Tristram, who then erected the 
house and offices which now occupy the site of the 
ancient dwelling. Mrs. or Molly Bushell (a very 
different Molly to our poor old Molly afore-named,) 
long lived at the place here alluded to. Mrs. Bushell,. 
or rather Molly Bushell, for she was scarcely known 
by any other name, became celebrated as the first 
fabricator of that luscious confection; called "Everton 
toffy." Her factory of sweets, however, was at a 



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ANTIQUITIES. 09 

house nearly opposite to the dwelling above-named, 
to Avhich place she removed when the old house was 
taken down. 

There was an old cottage at the S. W. corner of 
locality 40, e, a small, uncomfortable place, which was 
erected, there is little doubt, when the surrounding 
land was waste or common, for it stood in a strange 
angular position, its front facing the S. W. It was 
taken down when Messrs. Aspinall built their houses 
on the terrace. 

There was also a still more miserable ancient place 
of residence,* on locality 27, &. A more particular 
description of this hovel will be given hereafter. 

Almost from time immemorial, until the year 1788, 
there had been a pinfold, where cattle were im- 
pounded, which -stood near to, if not exactly at, the 
entrance gates to the grounds of Charles Shand, Esq., 
in what is now called Rupert-lane : the situation was 
most appropriate, for, in former "days, the town's smithy 
was exactly opposite to that pinfold. When it was 
demolished, another pinfold was constructed in the 
N. W. of Everton ; and more recently, one has been 
placed near the mere. 

It was in the year 1788 that the late William 
Harper, Esq. so much improved Rupert-lane, which, 
previous to that period, was rough, ill-formed, and 
sandy ; he had the pinfold removed,* the road paved, 

* 1st May, 1764. There is a minute made in the town's book, of a re- 
solution passed at a meeting of the inhabitants, authorising Mr. Halsall 
to make this removal.— Mr. Harper purchased " Croft on. the hill " from 
Mr. Halsall's heirs. 



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70 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

and the north side fenced off or bordered with a neat, 
high, and strong stone wall ; and, in what is termed a 
"give-and-take " way, he exchanged land so as to 
draw tolerably straight lines in the formation of 
the road. For some part of the township's land on 
the south, which he enclosed, he gave other land, 
and widened the road in the west, opposite to Mr. 
Ellinthorp's buildings, commencing the present broad 
formation of the south end of the terrace, which, 
many years afterwards, the township completed, by 
purchasing and laying to that road some lands and 
sites of houses belonging to the heirs of the late 
Daniel Backhouse, Esq. 

Until the year 1820, there stood an ancient cross in 
the village, in the centre of the wide open space lying 
between the enclosures or lots, marked on the map 
55, a, and 25, 6, about a hundred yards distant, in 
the east, from Rupert cottage. Although destitute of 
ornament, and not remarkable for elegance of appear- 
ance, that ancient relique ought to have been per- 
mitted to remain, — it was, indeed, Everton's last 
remnant of antiquity j nor did its presence encmnber 
or obstruct the way, for where the cross stood, the 
road is very wide and spacious, so that neither danger 
nor inconvenience was created by its presence : but, 
to accommodate some whim, or the accomplishment 
of some purpose, not worth enquiring or examining 
into, the "powers that then were" demolished and 
utterly destroyed the cross of Everton. Until a few 
years previous to the cross being removed, there was 



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ANTIQUITIES. 71 

a dial affixed on the upper surface of the pillar or 
shaft, charges for repairing which often occur in the 
town's accounts ; but at length it was suffered to be 
destroyed. 

At no very great distance from the S. E. boundary 
of Everton, once stood a large and strong stone castle, 
the site of which is little more than a musquet-shot 
distant, in the east, from the chapel at West Derby. 
It was erected by Edward the Confessor; and no doubt 
oftentimes, and particularly in turbulent seasons, the 
occupiers of that castle not only held rule and domi- 
nion over the ancient inhabitants of Everton, but 
afforded them protection. 

The site of an ancient castle, at West Derby, is 
named at the inquisition held at Lancaster, in 1327, 
and also in the Doomsday-book: timber and hewn 
stone have recently been dug out of its crumbled 
ruins. Mr. Mc George, of Everton, has a handsome 
writing-desk, constructed of a piece of oak which was 
dug out of these ruins. On a brass plate of that 
writing-desk, the following sentence is inscribed; 
" This desk was made from part of an oak beam that 
was dug out of the rains of Edward the Confessor's 
castle, at West Derby, Lancashire, supposed to have 
been built anno domini 1050; executed under the 
direction of J. Mc George, of Everton, 1826." 
There is a remarkable well or spring near to the site 
of the old castle. But these matters belong to the 
history of West Derby. 

A part of the north border of the lands of Everton 



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72 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

is denominated " Headless Cross ; " but what Head- 
less Cross was, or indeed where it exactly stood, is 
but imperfectly known, — tradition is silent on the 
subject, — but in old maps and title deeds, the name is 
still used. If the mark on the old maps truly points 
out the place where Headless Cross stood, it must 
have been situated on the bleak and open common, 
and may have been placed there as a memento of 
some atrocious deed, or great public event. 



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- 

SECTION IV. 



CURSORY OBSERVATIONS, 

ON THE GEOLOGY; THE PRODUCTIONS, EXTENT, AND VALUE 
OF THE SOIL; THE POPULATION; AND THE CLIMATE OF 
EVERTON. 



When nature laid the foundation of Everton, she 
was, undoubtedly, in one of her common-place hu- 
mours, for all which has, thus far, been seen of its 
substructure, or parts that lie beneath the surface of 
its soil, gives no promise of interest to the geologist. 

Except in a few instances, to procure free-stone* 
for architectural purposes, man has made no ap- 
proaches to examine into the subterranean parts, or 
" bowels," of Everton. Some of its small quarries 
have .yielded the required supplies of excellent, 
durable, reddish, or chocolate-coloured free-stone; 
but when the immediate wants have been supplied, 
the private quarries have been filled up, and no 
longer worked, with only one exception, that of the 

* It appears, on the face of the old map of 1716, that our ancestors 
quarried in Everton for stone, there being on that map marked " Stone 
Quarry," and that quarry must have been near to. where Mr. Lang's 
houses now stand. 



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74 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

quarry in the N. W., where operations are now con- 
tinued, and carried on in the way of trade. 

It would appear that all the hilly parts of Everton 
are composed of solid masses of this reddish-coloured 
free-stone, covered, but in many places only thinly, 
with friable calcareous earth. In the formation 
of Shaw-street, much of the same sort of stone 
has been procured near the surface, and sold, the 
operations being chiefly carried on in a part of the 
street opposite to where a church is building in the 
south-east quarter of the street ; but the quarrying 
for stone has latterly been extended to the adjoining 
land on the west. Copyholders of Everton will take 
notice that the owner of this land can sell the stone 
he quarries, for the land has been enfranchised, and 
is freehold. 

The stone of Everton is durable, and answers well 
for architectural purposes, of which many ancient 
buildings bear proof; its colom-, however, is not 
likely to recommend it to general use, and not 
more frequently perhaps than when other stone can- 
not be procured without considerable expense. If 
castles, or stupendous edifices,* were ever to be 
again erected, the sombre hue of the Everton stone 
would be well calculated for, and congenial with, such 
erections; but for light, tasty, modem buildings, it 
must give place to all free-stones of lighter, brighter, 
and whiter hues. 

* Some additional remarks on the north quarry stone will be met with 
in the section of the north-west district. 



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CURSORY OBSERVATIONS. 75 

Not any kind of metallic ore, or beds of coal, have 
been discovered in Everton ; nor is there, in tie entire 
township, the slightest indications of such treasures 
being hidden in its terrene bosom. 

The greater part of the superstrata, or upper coat 
of the soil of Everton, is shallow, sandy, and calca- 
reous. There are, indeed, some few patches of land 
in the township which are tolerably fertile ; for the 
most part, however, the soil of Everton is but mode- 
rately fertile, and certainly stands very much in need 
of the artificial aid of the husbandman. Not that the 
soil of Everton is to be altogether held in contempt, 
although, as to high purposes of agriculture, it may 
rank only as land of mediocre value ; yet its meadows 
afford very tolerable, and, in some parts, ample pas- 
turage, for the cattle of many graziers and dairymen. 
Pretty fair crops of hay, too, are occasionally carted 
from its fields ; and horticulture, with some artificial 
aids, is carried on in the township to a moderate 
extent, more especially by the gentry, in grounds 
contiguous to their dwellings. 

Neither corn nor edible roots, on a scale worthy of 
note, are attempted to be produced on the lands of 
Everton;. but some amateurs, and many of the 
gardeners of the gentry, raise fine fruit, both natu- 
rally and by heat. There are two nurseries, but not 
any extensive grounds dedicated to the exclusive 
service of Pomona, in Everton; the orchards are 
scarcely worthy of remark; and there is but one 
public garden in the whole township, and in that 



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76 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

only strawberries, and other small fruits, are culti- 
vated and produced. 

The surface of Everton is of small extent. About 
the year 1790, it was measured with tolerable accu- 
racy, and the result gave rather more than 310 
acres, which varies but in a trifling degree from 
the earliest accounts of the measure of the township. 
Gregson, who took some pains to ascertain the point* 
states, that the accounts given of Everton's size in 
days of yore, differ but little from what it is stated to 
be in modern times.* 

. In remote ages, the names of certain measures, or 
quantities of land, were such as are now no longer in 
use; our forefathers employed certain terms for such 
purposes, or meanings, which were, no doubt, well 
understood by them ; but there are few, if any, who 
now clearly know the real measure and extent of a 
hide, a bovate, a virgate, a caracute, an oxgang, or 
such like portions and parcels of land.f Such words 

. * According to a census taken in the year 1327, there were computed 
to be then 24 oxgangs of land in Everton ; which, at 12$ acres to the 
oxgang, gives 300 acres in the whole. 

f The following table has been constructed from the best authors ; 
but, on the whole, there is much uncertainty : — 

] hide of land was equal to 120 acres, or, as some say, 100 acres. 
. 1 virgate of land was equal to 40 acres. 

1 oxgang or bovate was equal to 12$ or 13 acres. 

1 caracute was equal to about 25 acres. 

Note. — One author says,, " six caracutes make a hide of land 
between the Ribble and the Mersey ; " and another author says, 
" one caracute is one-fourth part of a hide of land." 

1 knight's fee was equal to 5 hides of land. 

In Gregson's Fragments of Lancashire, it is stated that 15 caracutes 
make 4 hides of land. 



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CURSORY OBSERVATIONS. 77 

or terms are never met with now; nor are they to be 
found in the oldest deeds or transfer-documents ; but 
there are still some strange terms retained, and which 
are used to express the extent of certain parcels of 
land. As an instance, at an halmote-court of the 
lord of the manor, held on the 28th May, 1828, at 
West Derby, amongst other lands, in a certain sur- 
render made at that time, was a field, or piece of 
land, denominated "eight penny worth" of land ;" the 
extent of which was very nearly three quarters of an 
acre. The surrender here alluded to, is that of 
<] Tarbuck to Dugdale/' 

It would appear that, at some remote period, our 
ancestors were taxed, or had their lands valued, at a 
shilling per acre; or, as in the case of the great 
Everton lease for 1000 years, the chief rent being 
one shilling per annum per acre, breadths of land of 
an acre in extent were called twelve penny worth of 
land, and as the size of a field or close diminished, or 
became less than an acre, its fractional part of an 
acre gave it the corresponding fractional part of a 
shilling for denomination: thus, half' an acre was six 
penny worth of land, and so forth. But surely it is 
time to meet the better taste of these enlightened 
times; such strange denominations of lands sbould 
be obliterated from all conveyance deeds, and give 
place to the better defined names of the measures of 
the day. Bearing on this subject, a hint is thrown 
out here touching the differences of extent and quan- 
tity contained in our various modem acres, and which 



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78 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

exist, to a material degree,, even in counties adjoining 
each other. It would be a satisfactory measure to 
equalize the extent and contents of all British acres ; 
or rather, that all who now indiscriminately use the 
term acre, to denote various and excessive quantities 
of land, would discontinue the practice, and call their 
excessive measure by some other name ; suffering all 
acres of land in Britain to be considered statute acres, 
and neither more nor less in quantity than statute 
acres are. A slight effort would accomplish this, and 
put an end to the confusion and uncertainty which 
so frequently occur, whenever the word acre is used, 
without, at the same, positively defining, classing, 
or naming the description of acre intended to be 
expressed. 

Everton stands much indebted to its owners and 
occupiers of the last fifty years for the improvement 
of its appearance. Little more than half a century 
ago, heath, gorse, and weeds were, for the most part, 
its general crop ; and unsightly patches of barren, 
ill-enclosed land displeased the eye at every glance ; 
whilst now, delightful prospects, at every turn, and 
in every direction, draw the observer's attention. 
Everton now abounds with handsomely- walled plea- 
sure grounds, and well-enclosed fields, and is con- 
veniently intersected with admirable roads, commo- 
dious to the equestrian and pedestrian, for most of 
them are well paved, and many of the parapets are 
flagged, for two-thirds of their breadth, with admirable, 
well laid strong flags, whose smooth surface affords 



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CURSORY OBSERVATIONS. 79 

pleasure to those who have occasion to walk upon 
them. 

The respective property of each individual of the 
township is now carefully and neatly enclosed, and 
all the localities are clearly and effectually separated, 
with strong, and, in some places, handsome stone 
walls and neatly kept hedge-rows ; whilst nearly the 
entire of Everton' s surface is covered with dwellings, 
and cultivated lands, the latter of which produce 
edibles for the use of man and beast; and the 
commons and wastes, which were neglected and 
unsightly, are, in these days, redundant in vegetation, 
and beautiful to behold. 

The same lands of Everton are now let at £21 
per annum each acre, which, in periods within the 
recollection of many now living, did not let for half 
as many shillings per acre : the parents of some of 
the proprietors of what are now the best lands in 
Everton, gave only at the rate of about £200 per 
acre for copyholds, which, in extensive lots, have 
been sold within the last two years at 5s. per square 
yard, and latterly much higher. A sale has been 
very recently made, of lands in the S. "W. of 
Everton, amounting in value (as it is rumoured) to 
£30,000, for which 5s. per square yard is said to 
have been obtained ; whilst, for smaller portions of 
land in the township, near to where it joins Liverpool, 
16s. and upwards per square yard is given. Great 
as these prices seem to be, particularly when com- 
pared with those given for the same, or similar lands, 



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80 , HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

towards the middle, and even the close, of the last 
century ; yet experienced persons are of opinion, 
that, for many years to come, the value of lands in 
Everton will progressively advance. Nor can such 
opinion be deemed vague, or ill-founded, when the 
necessities of the rapidly encreasing population ' of 
Liverpool, and of Everton itself, are taken into full 
consideration. 

Buildings are compactly clustered in Everton 
already, and more particularly of late, in its western 
parts. Very shortly, indeed, will all our pleasant 
green fields, in the west, be converted into streets, 
squares, and enclosures, for the uses and wants of 
traders and manufacturers ; and at no great distance 
of time hence, there will not be a tree, shrub, or 
flower below the western crest of Everton hill, except 
such as the husbandman takes to market, or, per- 
haps, some few straggling remains of now standing 
trees, which will soon be sickly and drawn up, until 
they typify living skeletons. 

The greatest price known to have been obtained 
for lands at Everton, previous to the year 1810 — the 
extent of the lot being considered — was, for the pur- 
chase of about half an acre made by the late George 
Roach, Esq;, from the late Daniel Backhouse, Esq., 
and the late Ellis Lorimer, Esq., at the rate of 13s. 
per square yard; it is distant about one-third of a 
mile from Liverpool, and has been converted into a 
single villa, or residence, whereon an elegant mansion 
now stands! 



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CURSORY OBSERVATIONS. 81 

This sale is a striking contrast with that made by 
a Mr. Halsall, some years back, who sold twelve 
acres of good land, at Everton, for £125 ; and still 
more so with a sale made in the year 1549, of three 
fields, measuring two and a half acres, for which only 
£15 was obtained. 

The deed of conveyance, for this last-named pro- 
perty, is copied and given in the Appendix. The 
fields still bear the same names as specified in the 
deed, and are to be found on the east of what are 
termed " Aspinall's buildings," being at the back of 
those premises across the road, called Church-street; 
and they are not, in a straight line, more than 300 or 
400 yards distant from the land sold, as before stated, 
to Mr. Roach, at 13s. per square yard. 

Everton, in its present state, presents a beautiful 
and agreeable appearance, yet it must be granted 
that its beauties and advantages would be materially 
enhanced, were it more extensively wooded ; nothing 
like a forest, or extensive patch of woodland, is to be 
found in the entire township ; and, save and except 
fi a few tall trees," the shrubberies of the villas and 
pleasure grounds, and, in a few instances, on the 
hems of fields, Everton is lamentably deficient in 
the most essential and ornamental feature of rural 
scenery. 

it is reasonable to conclude that wood was not 
scarce at Everton in ancient times, but the wants of 
its own inhabitants, and those of its neighbours, when 
coal was little known, and difficult to be procured, 

G 



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82 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

may have caused the woods of Everton to disappear 
under the operation of the woodman's axe. ■ "Where 
also, it may be asked, are the woods and forests of 
West Derby ? Knowsley, it is true, is well wooded, 
and many other patches of wood may be met with 
in, and not very remote from Everton; but even 
these reliques of a once well-wooded country are 
slowly diminishing. It is not to our credit to write, 
that we of these enlightened, but (in the present 
case at least) heedless days, hew down freely, but 
plant sparingly. 

Sir Edward Moore, as may be found in the 
"Stranger in Liverpool," mentions a wood of eight 
acres extent, which had been planted by his great 
grandfather : it lay on the north part of Liverpool, 
extending, perhaps, somewhat into Kirkdell (Kirk- 
dale), and was in a thriving condition in the year 
1667. This wood could only have been a few yards 
distant from the west-edge of Everton ; but where is 
that wood now ? — not a vestige of it remains, and its 
site is barely conjectural. 

But in what manner the wood above alluded to 
has been destroyed, may be readily imagined, for Sir 
Edward Moore, in his address to his son, goes on to 
say, " remember you always give a charge to one of 
your servants to look to it, otherwise the town of 
Liverpool will absolutely destroye it." This is a 
direct reflection on the habits of the people of Liver- 
pool, whilst those of Everton, and of Kirkdale, seem 
not to be implicated or charged in any way, by 



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CURSORY OBSERVATIONS. 83 

Sir Edward, in aiding or abetting such improper 
practices, although the. said wood was on their very 
confines ; therefore, as it cannot he substantiated that 
the people of Everton, and of Kirkdale, were, in the 
days in question, more moral or more honest than 
their neighbours of Liverpool, it may be presumed 
there was then wood in Everton itself, and in West 
Derby, where the people of Everton had right of 
estovers, sufficient to answer the wants of both Ever- 
ton and West Derby. But, at the time in which 
Sir Edward treats, the immediate neighbourhood of 
Liverpool could not have been over wooded; for he 
goes on to say, speaking still of the wood, — S5 which, 
if you destroye, gould will scarce buy you wood for 
your sufficient use, in regard of the great skercity of 
>vood about you." 

It is now too late to attempt the embellishment of 
the western parts of Everton with woody patches, 
and park-like grounds ; and as to the other parts of 
Everton, the grazier and the dairyman offer more 
profitable considerations to the owners of land, in the 
shape of high and encreasing rents, than wood would 
yield ; in pasturage, too, the lands produce an imme- 
diate and valuable income, whilst the emoluments 
that might be derived from wood, now planted, would 
be uncertain, and could not be realised until many 
a flaxen head became grey. • 

There are many circumstances fast approaching, nay, 
actually taking place, which will prove serious draw- 
backs to the future claims of Everton, as a delightful 



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84 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

place of rural residence. The circumstances alluded 
to are already felt, Everton being frequently enveloped 
in dense and murky vapours which the crowded 
dwellings and factories of Liverpool send forth. This 
nuisance, it may be feared, will be constantly on the 
encrease ; although the eastern parts of Everton will 
for a long, a very long time, be free from it. 

The fast augmenting number of its own inhabitants 
has also, latterly, given a town-like character to the 
society of Everton ; and that hospitable, neighbourly, 
and formless intercourse of families, so peculiar to 
rural society, is now rarely to be met with in the 
township, except, indeed, amongst relatives and near . 
connexions; intercourse, it is true, is still kept up 
between those whom worldly friendships, and motives 
of interest and pleasure, — pleasure not infrequently 
akin to dissipation, — draw together, and often in 
congregations of such overwhelming numbers, as to 
cause enjoyment to be offensively jostled against, and 
satisfaction to be squeezed out of their entertaining 
rooms : in fine, Everton will soon become a site and 
scene whereon " the plodding citizens, and sons of 
trade," will play busy and ostentatious parts. 

It may be as well to run over here a brief com- 
parative statement of the numbers of the inhabitants 
of Everton at some selected, different epochs, con- 
trasting, in their extremes, its ancient with its late 
and present population. 

~ The most ancient account extant, which can lay 
any claims to authenticity, is a sort of census, 



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CURSORY OBSERVATIONS. 



85 



bearing date 1327, in the reign of Edward III.; 
there were then nineteen nativi (or heads of families) 
in the township, and they, as it is there written, held 
24 oxgangs of land. 

Taking five for the number of individuals in each 
family, the population of Everton must have been at 
that time, ninety-five souls. If this be near the fact, 
and there is little reason to doubt its being so, it 
would appear, that some centuries after the time 
before named, but little addition was made to the 
population of Everton; for it is found, by documents 
in the town's chest, that, in the year 1692, there 
were only 135 persons residing in the township, and 
in the year 1714, there were not more than 140. 
In the year 1769, the population of Everton had 
encreased to the number of 253 ; in the year 1 790, 
to 370; in 1801, to 499; and, in 1811, amounted 
to 913. 

It will display the respectability of the township's 
community, and may prove otherwise interesting, to 
give a statement of the stations in life, trades, &c. of 
the housekeepers who resided at Everton in the 
year 1815. 



Patrician 1 

Brewers 3 

Brokers > 11 

Tanner 1 

Tobacconist 1 

Tax Collectors 2 

Plumbers 2 

Masons 2 



Painters 3 

Carter 1 

Housekeeper-labourers 3* 
Housekeeper-servant . . 1 

Currier 1 

Physician 1 

Widow-housekeepers .. 22 
Spinster-housekeepers. 11 



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86 



HISTORY OF EVERTON. 



Gentlemen not in trade 22 

Stationer 

Cooper 

Hairdresser 

Shoemaker 

Drovers 

Covvkeeper 

Pavier 

Clergymen 4 

Architect 

Schools 

Dentist 

Shopkeeper 

Flour dealer 

Gardener 

Shipwright : 



Hosier , 1 

Ironmongers 2 

Bricklayer 1 

Blacksmith 1 

Merchants 44 

Lawyers 3 

Jeweller 1 

Printer 1 

Liquor merchants 2 

Tailors 2 

Glass dealer 1 

Drapers 2 

Cork cutter 1 

Grocers 4 

Joiners 7 

Publicans 2 



In 1821 , a very correct census was taken, which 
gave the number of the then inhabitants of Everton, 
2109; whilst at the present time, 1829, it is pro- 
bable there are 3763. The last number is calculated 
from the ley-book of the year, which gives 579 
inhabited houses, and allowing 6^- individuals to each 
house, the total is as above stated. The number 
of new houses already completed, together with those 
in progress of building, at Everton, in the years 
1829 — 30, is little, if at all, short of 100. Everton 
bids fair to make more rapid strides in the encrease 
of its population than even its thriving neighbour has 
done ; for in the year 1700, Liverpool had only 5714 
inhabitants. 

There is every reason to suppose that at the next 
period of taking a census of the kingdom, the popula- 



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CURSORY OBSERVATIONS. 87 

tion of Evertbn will be nearly double what it was 
at the taking of the last census. 

Population, 1821— Liverpool, Male ...54,340 1 

Female 64,632 J 118 ' 972 
In 1811 the inhabitants were 94,376 

In 1821— Everton, Male ... 760 1 

Female 1,349$ 2 ' 109 
In 1811 the inhabitants were only 913* 

In 1821— West Derby, Male ... 2,695 1 

Female 3,609 > 6 ' 304 
In 1811 the inhabitants were 3,7 18 

For more information on this, and other statistical 
points, some tables, and many notes and observations, 
are given in the Appendix. 

The climate of Everton is but what can be said 

of it, if the character of the climate of Britain, as 
described by a Frenchman, on his return to France, 
be true? "What," asked the people of Paris of 
the travelled Frenchman, "is the climate of Britain ?" 
" Ma foi ! " replied monsieur, with an entire shrug, 
and a semi-sliiver, " They have in England nine 
months winter, and three months bad weather, in one 
year/' The reply was hyperbolical, but the climate 
of "la belle France" tempted his conscience to 
suffer his tongue to take some liberties with truth :: 
but if the climate of Britain were every year as it was 
in the year 1829, the Frenchman's assertion would 
not be at variance with veracity. 

Lancashire has perhaps, on the whole, as humid an 

* More than doubled. 



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$8 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

atmosphere as any English county whatever; some 
parts of it are almost proverhially subject to rainy 
weather. It must have struck another Frenchman 
very forcibly that Manchester was a place where 
rain was constantly falling, for, after an absence of 
some two years, he encountered a Manchester ac- 
quaintance in Paris, and accosted him in the following 
words ; ^ Pray, sir, has it left off raining in Man- 
chester yet ? " 

Everton, of course, participates in the atmospheric 
lot which providence apportions to the county it is 
seated in ; it must, however, be taken into conside- 
ration, that the local situation of Everton gives it 
some advantages, but, as all things in nature are of 
a mixed character, that which, in a great measure, 
renders Everton so delightful at most times, causes 
it to labour under disadvantages in certain seasons. 

Everton is tolerably elevated above the level of the 
sea, near to which it stands, and being unsheltered, 
is consequently exposed to fierce storms. In severe 
winters, and inclement periods, the air of Everton is 
cold, keen, and piercing; but when the north and 
the north-west winds blow with gentle, or only mode- 
rate force, the climate of Everton is as salubrious as 
that of the ocean itself; then, indeed, the sea-breezes, 
in wholesome purity, waft themselves through and 
over the whole township. At such times, no bane- 
ful effluvia, or smoky vapours, are conveyed from 
Liverpool, by the passing breeze, to any part of 
Everton. 



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CURSORY OBSERVATIONS. 89 

It sometimes happens, in the winter months, when 
the north and west gales travel with the hurricane's 
velocity and violence, that the winds from the sea axe 
unwelcome visitors; and, owing to the unsheltered 
situation of Everton, it is not unfrequently ravaged 
by those tempests of the ocean, from which the town- 
ship has sustained much damage. Some serious 
disasters, losses, and fatal accidents have occurred 
from these circumstances, at several periods, which 
will be noticed in other parts of this work. 

Taking, however, the aggregate of times and sea- 
sons into due estimation, the climate of Everton 
may be denominated bracing and salubrious; it 
may perhaps be too sharp and keen for delicate con- 
stitutions, or for invalids whose strength may be 
prostrated, or for systems excessively shattered, but it 
is admirably adapted for all who may require, or will 
venture to place themselves in, a bracing atmospheric 
hath; indeed, it may be safely said, that those who 
may be temporarily unwell, cannot reside in a more 
desirable place. Such persons have every chance of 
finding the climate of Everton an excellent and seldom^ 
failing antidote to disease ; for, except when the south- 
west winds blow, if pure air be • near, it will, of a 
certainty, be brought to Everton. 

On the whole, making the required distinction of 
elevated situation, the climate of Everton closely assi- 
milates to that of Liverpool ; the reader is, therefore, 
referred to the very scientific work of Dr. Dobson, a 



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90 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

late inhabitant of Liverpool ; and to a more modem 
publication, entitled " A Familial* Medical Survey of 
Liverpool." 

There is an advantage which presents itself, of con- 
siderable importance, in estimating the value of Ever- 
ton as a place of residence, namely, its desirable 
distance from, yet convenient proximity to Liverpool, 
where the necessaries, conveniences, and luxuries 
of life abound. 

Thus, the very situation affords a temptation, nay 
creates a necessity, for exercise. From their resi- 
dences at Everton, men of business proceed daily to 
their affairs in Liverpool, and the fail* sex frequently 
visit the well supplied markets and excellently stored 
magazines of that great commercial town; from the 
first of which the larder and store-room are amply 
replenished, whilst the latter gratify the eye, furnish 
adornment for the person or the mind of the lovely 
fair ones who visit these tempting repositories of 
useful, fashionable, elegant, and tastefully displayed 
commodities, many of which are indispensable to gen- 
teel life. 

Many a fail* daughter of Everton owes much of the 
hue of health and ruddy beauty she now enjoys, to 
the excursions she has taken, over and over again, to 
the neighbouring town ; but it must be granted, that 
she is more particularly indebted to her strolls in the 
pure air of Everton, and its vicinage ; where she can 
enjoy the most charming prospects, or indulge in 



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CURSORY OBSERVATIONS. 



91 



pleasing ruminations or reminiscences, ill the rural 
privacies of shaded and retired roads, or inhale 
fragrant odours in well-trimmed lawns, picturesque 
pleasure-grounds, or well-stored gardens : pale, per- 
haps, had been her cheek, and pallid her now ruby 
lip, had fate immured her in a close, pent-up cham- 
ber, in one of the narrow streets or thorough fares of 
Liverpool. 

Sheltered by the crest of the hill, the western plain 
of Everton, and the slope of its brow, afford, in the 
winter season particularly, delightful sites for places 
of residence, whose inmates can be little inconve- 
nienced by the visitation of piercing, inclement easterly 
winds ; but when in winter the north and east winds 
prevail, the summit of the hill, and the north and east 
parts of Everton, are somewhat bleak and cold, nor 
is it probable that art can materially alter them. 
These circumstances are thus pointedly set forth, with 
a view to guide those persons who may be desirous of 
domiciling themselves at Everton, as to the spots most 
likely to suit their respective constitutions ; but, after 
all, it must be granted, that during a great portion of 
the year, the eastern parts of Everton are delightful — 
and as a whole form a most charming region; for, 
during the summer and autumnal months, they may 
be said to compose a spot of real rural beauty. 

As to the summit of the hill, its western prospects 
are so grand, extensive, and variegated, that they 
tempt even the timid and the delicate to dwell on its 



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92 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

exposed situation ; and there they brave the winter's 
storms and inclemencies ; hope still reminding them 
of summer's coming advantages, beauties, and delights. 
. A short walk, of only a few minutes' duration, takes 
a pedestrian from Liverpool's busy and bustling 
scenes into a modern Arcadia, where, gradually, the 
hum of human toil is lost, and is exchanged for that 
of the busy bee, and the sparrow's merry chirp ; then 
it is, that, having, escaped the hoarse, croaking cries of 
venders of wares, the vehicles of trade, and the con- 
verse-killing rattle and noise of the carts of commerce, 
as he journeys into Everton, his ears are greeted 
and delighted at every step, with sweet notes, gratui- 
tously offered, by the "cheerful songsters of the 
grove" — songsters, which can charm and delight the 
natural ear much more than can the artificial capa- 
bilities of a Sontag, or a Catalani. To people pro- 
ceeding from Liverpool into Everton, the suddenness 
of this change of scene, and the exliilarating effects 
of meliorated air, seem almost the effect of magic ; 
therefore, with natural zest and gold, the inhabitants 
of Liverpool seem to enjoy their visits to one of 
Britain's most charming villages. 

On Sundays, and kept holidays, the roads and 
avenues w T hich lead to and from Everton, are much 
thronged with visitors, drest in their best, inhaling 
large and refreshing draughts of pure air, and feast- 
ing their eyes with delightful views, both sea-ward 
and land-ward. But the number of visitors has latterly 



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CURSORY OBSERVATIONS. 93 

been much diminished, chiefly in consequence of the 
safety and cheapness of conveyance by steam vessels, 
which tempt many of the former visitants of Everton, 
whenever they can temporarily leave the dense and 
murky atmosphere of their gigantic and still enereas- 
ing town, to cross the river Mersey, to view and ramble 
over the verdant grounds of Cheshire, on the oppo- 
site, inviting shore. 



/ 



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SECTION V. 



TENURES OF PROPERTY. 



To search into the tenures of landed property, from 
their sources down to these times of secure-holding, 
must be deemed a satisfactory enquiry by all those 
who study, or take pleasure in marking, the progress 
of the laws which govern and protect our social 
interests. Such study, or enquiry, equally regards 
and applies to the history of Everton's soil, as to 
those of the greatest and proudest empires. It is this 
apparent necessity which has impelled or induced the 
presentation of the following preliminary dissertation 
on the origin of present and past tenures, under 
which the lands of Everton are and have been 
long held. 

Of the tenures under which the lands of Britain 
were held, prior to the Saxon conquest and rule, 
little or nothing is known : the Saxons, however, par- 
celled out among themselves into allotments the lands 
of the conquered British provinces ; each monarch of 
the heptarchy distributing to respective chiefs, ac- 
cording to their rank, or desert, or to the favour in 
which they were held. It was then that the Saxon 



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TENURES OF PROPERTY. 95 

leaders, or chief men, seated themselves on portions 
of their own soil, and in time became peaceable 
agriculturalists, exercising a lord's right over their 
vassals, labourers, and shepherds — the aborigines of 
Britain, and the lower grades of their own coun- 
trymen. 

It was then and thus that the first known appor- 
tionments of lands were made to individuals, and 
became the property of subjects of the realm or realms 
of the heptarchy in Britain. " Then also originated 
our manors, villages, and townships ; not their pre- 
cise names, it is true, but their customs, rights, and 
tenures ; which, having commenced in the earliest 
existence of Northumbria, still subsist, with little 
alteration but in the orthography of their names, and 
gradual extension of cultivation." 

After the Norman conquest, William the Conqueror 
arbitrarily dispossessed most of the chief Anglo- Saxon 
proprietors of the soil, and granted to his own chiefs, 
favourites, and followers large divisions of territory, 
even, in some cases, to the extent of whole hundreds, 
and many townships and villages, to a single indi- 
vidual. Immediately after the conquest, the township 
of Everton was held under those lords, in whom, 
from time to time, the possession of the honour, or 
barony, of Lancaster was vested, and who had 
themselves to render satisfaction to the crown, ac- 
cording to certain terms, under the performance of 
which they held sub-dominion over their respective 
territories. Historians are generally agreed, that at 



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06 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

or about this period, lauds were made hereditary to* 
sub-proprietors, on conditions that required, in most 
cases, a knight's service for a certain stipulated 
portion of land. The nobles possessed extensive 
domains, which were divided into fees, each fee to 
furnish a knight for the king, or for the superior. 
The knights thus furnished fought on horseback, and 
were armed with sword, lance, and shield : it is said 
that for five hides of land the lord was bound to fur- 
nish the service of a knight. 

As time rolled on, wealth and effeminacy encreased, 
and fines, in money and goods, were offered and ac- 
cepted in lieu of furnishing and equipping a knight ; 
thus were established, what are now called rents, and 
rent became the parent of taxation. But it would lead 
too far to give more of the history of taxation, than 
that it took its rise from this composition, or rent of 
money, &c. in lieu of knight's service. Still, how- 
ever, much of the arbitrary leaven of the feudal 
system remained, under the operation of which sub- 
proprietors continued to be much annoyed ; and thus 
matters continued, until Magna Charta established 
and secured the rights of individuals to all justly ac- 
quired property. 

Although much of the soil of Everton is held 
under a tenure which had its origin in feudal times, 
yet so admirably are those reliques of rude days 
environed by the laws of the constitution, that copy- 
hold possessions, save in their disability to work 
mines for salt, and in some instances to fell timber 



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TENURES OF PROPERTY. 97 

for sale,* and the inconveniences of a few set forma- 
lities, which will he noticed hereafter, are as secure 
and eligible, and in many respects more so, than any 
other tenures in the kingdom. Thus is the know- 
ledge gathered that, in ancient times, and down to 
the happy and glorious establishment of Magna Charta, 
kings, at pleasure, granted and gave lands, and at 
pleasure dispossessed the lord of his manor. Grants 
of land were then issued, and frequently recalled or 
revoked, at the sovereign's will; but the barons of 
England, in King John's day, established the right 
to hold their estates independent of every power but 
that of the law. Lords of manors became independent 
proprietors ; they regulated and adjusted matters with 
their tenantry, free of regal interference, according to 
established rales and customs ; and they admitted the 
rights of their copyholders to be as secure and valid 
as their own, liable only to such forfeiture and bereave- 
ment as manorial customs, and the laws of the land, 
had ordained. Since then, the lands of Everton have 
been granted to copyholders, or old grants sanctioned 
and continued, under easy, nay almost insignificant, 
terms of suit, service, fine, and rent; and the 
copyhold estates of Everton have descended, and 
continue to descend, according to the ordinary rules 
of consanguinity, or bequest, as the statutes direct, 
without the lord of the manor having power to 



* A copy of the customs of the manor of West Derby (and of Everton) 
is given in the Appendix, in which it will be perceived that copyholders 
of those manors may "fell and sell wood and underwood." 

H 



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98 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

oppose, with any hope of success, such equitable and 
just appropriation of reversions. 

The superior tenures, under which the lands of 
Everton are held, are those which, in common par- 
lance, are termed freehold, copyhold of inheritance,* 
and leasehold. The last-named term is limited to 
lands which are held under a lease, granted in 1716, 
by the lord (and lady) of the manor, for 1000 years. 
Inferior, or sub-tenures, are those of leases for lives, 
of various terms of time, and very many of yearly 
lettings. It should be generally known, and borne 
well in mind, that in strictness, according to the cus- 
tom of most manors, no copyholders of inheritance or 
otherwise can lease their copyholds to any under- 
tenant for a longer period than one year, ivithout 
license being first obtained of the lord of the manor. 

The tenure of freehold or fee-simple is well and 
sufficiently known. As to the Everton freeholds, they 
were originally copyholds, or waste lands, enfranchised 
by purchase or otherwise of lords of the manor. 

Of the freeholds, then, and the inferior tenures of 
Everton, it is not intended now to treat ; but of the 
copyhold tenures, and those of the lease for 1000 
years, notice at large will be taken. As there are 
many persons who have no other idea of copyhold 
tenures than that they are common, yet good titles, 
it is deemed proper to go somewhat at length into the 

* There are a few patches of land in Everton that are said to be held 
under copyhold tenure for 1000 years, such as 25, a, b, c, and d, and 
34, b, and c. 



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TENURES OF PROPERTY. 99 

nature of such tenures, and of the practice of the 
manor court, or halmote court, of the Marquis of 
Salisbury: at the same time it must he distinctly 
understood, that what is about to be stated, has not 
been drawn up by one who is of the profession of the 
law, and therefore, though these observations may 
give a tolerable insight into the subject, they must 
not* lead to any determination in nice, critical, and 
disputed points which may arise on copyhold ques- 
tions. 

In ordinary cases, there are no better tenures than 
those of copyhold ; the titles of such pass from pos- 
sessor to possessor, after being prepared and examined 
by the steward of the manor, and by the decision of a 
jury, whose duty it is, under the steward's guidance, 
to see that the surrenders which have to pass under 
their verdict be correct. This open, public, and 
clear manner of registering, or enrolling, tranfers of 
copyhold (be such transfers of bargain, demise, or 
mortgage) gives a great degree of security to such 
transactions. It is true, fraud may occasionally occur, 
and copyhold transfers be at times erroneously made 5 
but to such disadvantages all transfers of freeholds 
and leaseholds are liable, and in a higher degree than 
those of copyholds. A copyholder cannot mortgage 
his copyhold, without giving the act publicity ; and 
this publicity is advantageous to the community, for 
no second, or subsequent mortgage can be taken 
privily; but on freeholds and leaseholds, what are 



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100 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

termed second mortgages have been privily taken, and 
to the injury of second mortgagees. 

The law sanctions and sustains manorial customs, 
as to the lord and the copyholder ; but in cases where a 
stranger may be concerned, the law is paramount, and 
overrules custom : for instance, in a case, " where a 
copyholder leased his copyhold contrary to the custom 
of the manor ; yet the lease was good, as to lessor 
and lessee, although not to the lord of the manor." — 
Owen 17. Downingham's case. But in such cases, 
it is presumed, the lord could levy fine on the copy- 
holder. Copyholders will, therefore, do well to avoid 
the penalty, by conforming to the customs of the 
court baron.* 

/, The copyholders of Everton, as has been already 
■noticed, hold their copyholds under the lord of the 
manor, and to him they are bound as to suit and 
service, which, in reality, are but light obligations; 
to him, or to his representative, they have also to pay 
certain fixed rents, of very insignificant amount. 
Those rents, however, trifling as they are, ought to 
be paid annually and regularly; for, although they 
may not be demanded for a number of years by the 
lord's steward, they are never entirely lost sight of, 
and the time always arrives when, at some transfer of 



* In the Appendix will be found a copy of the customs of the manor 
of West Derby, which are also the customs of Everton ; and there also 
will be found copious extracts touching on manors, courts baron, copy- 
holds, &c. 



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TENURES OF PROPERTY. 101 

the property, those rents, together with all small items 
of fines and forfeitures in arrear, are demanded and 
paid. The main part of those, fines and forfeitures 
arises from neglect and irregularity in the payment of 
rent, and from failure in attendance to perform suit 
and service ; the amount, however, of the whole sum, 
for rent, suit, service, fines, and forfeitures, it is again 
repeated, is insignificant. 

The appearance of the Everton copyholder is due 
at the lord's halmote court, once at least annually, 
and if not obeyed or performed, a fine is incurred, 
trivial, it is true, and seldom demanded, until, accu- 
mulating for a number of years, the whole amount 
of the fines becomes worthy of notice, and is, as 
before stated in the case of rent, demanded and paid. 
The custom is, for the lord of the manors of West 
Derby, Everton, &c, to hold a court annually by his 
steward, on some given day in Whitsun-w T eek, in a 
small building at West Derby : this building is called . 
the "Court-house; " it is an old, but still strong, 
stone erection, and, in appearance, little better than a 
larger kind of cottage ; its interior is kept clean, and 
fitted up in the plainest manner; not a vestige of 
decoration or ornament, either within or without, does 
it possess; nor has any attention been bestowed on 
its internal conveniences, beyond what the business to 
be transacted within its walls absolutely required ; in 
fine, it is more in keeping with what such places were 
centuries ago, than with public buildings of this age 
of improvement and taste. Were the lord of the 



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102 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

manor's arms placed in some conspicuous part of the 
interior of the court-house, they would form an appro- 
priate embellishment ; and particularly so, when it is 
considered that coats of arms, and also copyhold 
courts, owe their origin to the feudal system. 
* - Separated from the main apartment of the com't- 
house, is a small closet, in which, it is said, the records 
and other documents of these manors are deposited. 

It may be necessary to explain why the manorial 
affairs of Everton are transacted in the same court, 
and at the same time, with the business of other adja- 
cent manors ; the explanation will be best given in a 
concise quotation from an able treatise on copyhold 
tenures. " The court baron, as well as the customary 
and copyhold court, must be held within its own 
manor; but, if a lord be seized of two or more manors, 
then, by custom, courts may be held upon one for all" 
— and again, it is worthy of notice, that " in ancient 
times the tenants were all bound to attend these 
courts, or suffer mulct ; nor were they allowed to sit, 
but were constrained to remain standing and bare- 
headed" 

The affairs, therefore, of all the manors in this vici- 
nage, of which the Marquis of Salisbury is the lord, 
are transacted together in the court-house at West 
Derby annually, on one set day, at Whitsuntide; 
but adjournments are announced, from period to 
period ; and on special occasions, courts are frequently 
held, or, as it is termed, "courts are called," at other 
place and places than the court-house of West Derby. 



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TENURES OF PROPERTY. 103 

The calling of an extra of special court is resorted to, 
when business occurs that cannot be delayed until the 
regular, annual, or "Whitsuntide courts are held : but 
it is laid down in some law books that a court baron 
cannot be held, until three weeks may have elapsed 
from the holding of a previous court baron of and for 
the same manor* 

So indifferent, or so ignorant, are many of the copy- 
holders of Everton, and of other places, of their liabi- 
lity to attend the lord of the manor's regular annual 
courts, that it seldom happens a sufficient number of 
copyholders would be likely to appear as would form 
a competent jury to transact the routine business, 
were not the bailiff to issue summonses, or invita- 
tions, to a certain number of copyholders, whose 
inclination or leisure may suffer them, without much 
inconvenience, to attend; and even after such pre- 
cautionary step has been taken, it sometimes occurs 
(as it did in the year 1828,*) that a jury is with 
difficulty formed. After the jurymen are sworn, the 
business of the court commences ; all the lord's copy- 
holders are called over by name, a service which the 
steward himself performs, who presides in the court 
as the lord's representative. The names of the copy- 
holders are twice called over, lest some who were 
absentees during the first summons, might have made 
their appearance before it w&s brought to a close. 

» The business of the court had not been entered upon through lack of 
jurymen, when casually, out of curiosity, the writer of this visited the 
court, — he was impressed into service, — and business progressed. 



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104 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

Those copyholders who appear are not fined, * and 
many absentees make a saving in their mulct, by 
employing persons to pay the small demand of four- 
pence for each of their copyholds, as their names axe 
called. Some other minute forms are used and ob- 
served, touching the lord's rights and privileges, of 
which it is not intended to go into details ; it may, 
however, be proper to notice that many, if not all, of 
the minor forms of this court would, in all likelihood, 
be neglected, and by disuse become entirely extinct, 
did not weightier considerations, with which they are 
connected, lie behind ; of which more hereafter. 

At the annual meeting, or holding of the lord's 
court, the completion of surrender and transfer is 
effected by the verdict of juries, touching inheritance, 
sale, exchange, or mortgage of copyhold property. 
The process consists in making a formal surrender 
(but which in reality is only a matter of form) by the 
grantor to the lord of the manor, who instanter (with- 
out veto) passes all premises, so surrendered, to the 
grantee; whereby the grantee is invested with all 
benefit of property so passed, under restraint only of 
the custom of the manor, as to suit, service, and rent, 
and with permission to use and employ for ever such 
passed property as to him, the grantee, and his suc- 
cessors, may seem most advantageous — working of 
mines for sale, only excepted. As regards working 
of mines, the following extract from a judge's charge 
to a jury, in a cause lately tried, will serve to give an 
insight into the law of exemption, or the lack of right 



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TENURES OF PROPERTY. 105 

in copyholders to work without license, or to their 
own benefit, mines which may exist even in their own 
copyholds. " Mines lying under most, if not all, the 
copyhold tenements in the north of England, belong 
to the lord of the manor, but the lord is obliged to 
make an agreement with the tenant to allow him to 
enter his land ; for if they come to no agreement, the 
minerals must remain unraised." — Stowe versusHxen- 
ton; Court of Bang's Bench, 26th November, 1828. 
' It is only a just and deserved tribute of praise 
paid to the conduct of the present steward to the lord 
of the manors of West Derby, Everton, &c. — the very 
worthy John S. Leigh, Esq. — to say that his bland and 
gentlemanly manners win him the respect and esteem 
of every copyholder who has to attend at the manorial 
courts, and indeed of all with whom he has inter- 
course, whether in matters of business, or in the more 
grateful performances of the duties of the social com- 
pact. 

The copyholders of the west parts of Everton will 
be likely, very shortly, at each transfer of their copy- 
holds, to find a serious disadvantage in their liability 
to go through the manor-courts' customary forms; 
and also, in the increased expense incurred at the 
calling of extra, or special courts ; to which may be 
added other charges, in the shape of fees, &c. to the 
officers, jurors, &c. of such courts : nor is it a slight 
disadvantage that the parties bargaining cannot select 
their own lawyers to draw up the needful deeds, that 
business being invariably performed by the steward, 



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/ 



106 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 



/ 
j 

who is always (now-a-days at least) a gentleman of 
the law; consequently, if any other lawyer be em- 
ployed, together with the steward, the fees and 
charges are materially enhanced. 

This is not of so much consideration when the 
transfer of property is of magnitude ; but the prox- 
imity of Everton to Liverpool has already caused, 
and will hereafter much more frequently cause, many 
of the copyholds of Everton' to be sub-divided and 
portioned into numberless building lots, and minute 
patches, all and every separately owned lot of which 
lias to go through the same forms of transfer as the 
most extensive copyhold property in the township: 
it is therefore the interest of eveiy copyholder to have 
his copyhold enfranchised ; for, at the ratio in which 
Liverpool is encreasing, the surface of its soil will soon 
be covered with edifices, or appropriated to the uses of 
trade and manufacture; and, as a natural consequence, 
Everton (and particularly its western parts) will also 
be covered with buildings, or parcelled out into minute 
subdivisions and allotments, for commercial and general 
purposes. 

A most excellent alteration of the law touching 
copyhold estates, w T as made by the legislature some few 
years ago : it was formerly necessary for each copy- 
holder to go through the form of surrendering his 
copyhold to the lord of the manor, to the use of his will; 
without such surrender, as the law stood, a testamentary 
bequest of any such copyholds, as those of Everton, 
was inutile and invalid ; therefore copyholds, so cir- 



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TENURES OF PROPERTY. 107 

cumstanced, passed into possession of the heir at law 
of the last seized copyholder, notwithstanding such 
last seized copyholder had bequeathed the copyhold 
to any other person. 

The obligation to make surrender to the use of a 
will, led to no other advantage than that of throwing 
some fees and emoluments into the hands of the officers 
of manor courts ; the law was, therefore, very wisely 
abrogated by a special act of parliament. As the 
law now stands, copyholders may bequeath their copy- 
holds as effectively as they can other lands, free from 
the ancient obligation of surrendering such copyholds 
to the use of a will. 

The particulars of many cases of hardship which 
arose, under and in consequence of the old law, might 
be adduced. It is only a few years since, that a gen- 
tleman died, leaving a valuable Everton copyhold to 
his niece ; but a surrender to the use of his will had 
not been passed, therefore the copyhold fell to his 
brother,* who, being an honest, honourable man, went 
instantly, when applied to, through the needful forms 
to make the copyhold the property of the individual 
to whom his brother had bequeathed it. The world 
is not virtuous enough to permit it to be said, — thus 
all others would have done. 

Having treated diffusely on the copyhold, atten- 
tion may be now turned to the leasehold, tenures of 
Everton. 

There are 115 acres of land, of the customary mea- 

* The late much respected Samuel Johnson, Esq. 



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108 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

sure, in Everton, held under lease for 1000 years ; 
which lease bears date 3d August, 1716, and was 
granted by the trustees of Lady Henrietta Maria 
(daughter and heiress of William. George Richard, a 
late Earl of Derby) and her husband, Lord Ashburn- 
ham. 

As it may afford some useful information, and 
exhibit some curious facts, a concise history of the 
St. Domingo estate is presented to the reader's 
notice. Such procedure will also shew the progres- 
sive advance in the value of some of the lands of 
Everton during the last century, and up to the present 
time \ and, at the same time, some knowledge will 
be obtained of the nature and conditions of the lease 
itself. 

The trustees of Henrietta Maria, the wife of Lord 
Ashburnham, and only surviving daughter and heiress 
of William George Richard, a late Earl of Derby, 
jointly with the said Lord and Lady Ashburnham, 
"in consideration of the sum of £115 paid to them, 
did lease to J. Seacome, of Liverpool, H. Halsall, of 
Everton, R. Johnson, of Everton, T. Hayes, of Ever- 
ton, and J. Rose, of Thornton, for and on the general 
behalf of the copyholders of Everton, one hundred and 
fifteen acres of land in Everton, of the measure there 
used, being heretofore in three divisions, called Hang- 
field, Whitefield, and Netherfield, and being then 
pails of wastes or commons, called Break, as far as 
the commons did extend themselves, to hold the said 
commons, &c, for the term of 1000 vears, under the 



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TENURES OF PROPERTY. 



109 



yearly rent of £5 15s., payable to the said trustees, 
their heirs, &c, during the said term." 

In an indenture, dated 28th July, 1 724, it is set 
forth, that the several owners and proprietors (lessees 
and copyholders) of the before-named lands had 
separated and divided their several parts, and upon 
such partition, H. Halsall had apportioned to his 
share 25a. 2r. 26p.* of land; the land is described at 
large in this indenture, which identifies some of the 
share appropriated to H. Halsall, as the land which 
afterwards became the St. Domingo estate. 

Mr. HalsalTs family remained in possession of this 
land until 23d August, 1757, at which time his 
family sold some of it to a merchant of Liverpool, 
named George Campbell ; on the 2d February, 1758, 
Mr. Campbell purchased other land from the afore- 
named J. Seacome. The lands thus purchased lay 
contiguous to each other, and Mr. Campbell, after 
erecting sundry buildings, and otherwise much im- 
proving the property, gave the name of St. Domingo 
to the consolidated estate. 

In the year 1770 (Mr. Campbell being dead), a 
Mr. John Crosbie, also a merchant of Liverpool, con- 
tracted to purchase the St. Domingo estate for £3800, 
and paid down about £680 in part, or as earnest, of 
the purchase ; but Mr. Crosbie became a bankrupt, 
and his assignees ' offered his interest in the St. 
Domingo estate for sale, at the Pontack's Inn, in 
Liverpool, but no bidder appeared. There being no 

* In some documents it is stated that IT. Halsall's share was 2Ga.0r. 19p. 



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110 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

chance of profit likely to accrue to Mr. Crosbie's 
creditors from the bargain touching the St. Domingo 
estate, the premises were conveyed over, on the terms 
at which Mr. Crosbie had purchased them, unto 
Messrs. Gregson, Bridge, and Parke, of Liverpool, 
who, in addition to the £G80 paid as earnest money 
by Mr. Crosbie, paid £3449 17s., making £4129 17s. 
— that is to say, £3800 for the purchase, and 
£329 17s. for interest remaining unpaid, as was 
stipulated in the contract. 

In the conveyance to Messrs. Gregson and Co., 
the lands of the St. Domingo estate are stated to be 
13a. 3r. 1p. of the large measure, eight yards to the 
perch or pole. On the 2d February, 1773, Messrs, 
Gregson and Co. sold the St. Domingo estate to the 
late John Sparling, Esq., a merchant of Liverpool, 
for £3470, and the estate remained in Mr. Sparling's 
possession to the time of his decease, which took place 
in the year 1800. 

There are some, remarkable passages relative to 
this St. Domingo estate in the late Mr. Sparling's 
will ; one of which is a clause, that forbade his heirs 
to let or dispose of the St. Domingo property for any 
period beyond the teiin of seven years. This restric- 
tion did not meet the views of his heirs, and, in con- 
sequence of general and unanimous agreement among 
themselves, application was made to parliament 50th 
George III., 18th April, 1810, and a bill was obtained, 
to empower certain trustees to dispose of the St. 
Domingo estate : the trustees were, however, boimd 



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TENURES OF PROPERTY. Ill 

by clauses of the said act, to lay out the proceeds of 
the sale of the said estate in some secure way, so as 
to answer all the trusts of the late Mr. Sparling's 
will. 

When application was made to parliament for 
permission to sell the St. Domingo estate, it was 
stated to the legislature, that although certain pur- 
chasers had offered to give £20,000 for the estate, 
yet the entire rental was only £395 10s. & annum. 

In the year 1811, the trustees, under the power 
granted to them by the said act of parliament, sold 
the St. Domingo estate, in parts, to William Peat 
Litt, Esq. and to William Ewart, Esq., for £20,295 ; 
in the same year, however, Mr. Ewart became the 
sole proprietor; and on the 13th September, 1812, 
he sold the whole estate to the commissioners for the 
affairs of barracks for £26,383 6s. 8d. subject to 14s. 
9d. ^ annum, the proportion of lord's rent. 

The estate remained in the possession of government 
for some time, but the 57th Geo. III., chap. 9, em- 
powered the commissioners for the affairs of barracks, 
if they deemed it needful, to dispose of lands previ- 
ously purchased for the barrack department. In 
consequence of that authority, the St. Domingo estate 
was put up to sale, but as no purchasers appeared, 
the property was divided into several lots, many of 
which have been sold.* 

There is reason to suppose the barrack department 
will not be gainers in the transaction, touching the 

* The whole has been sold— 1829. 



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112 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

purchase and sale of the St. Domingo estate; but 
there have been many untoward circumstances, too 
numerous to bring forward, which have tended to 
depreciate the property, the causes of which, however, 
have been latterly, and are still, gradually diminish- 
ing, nay, it may be stated, have now pretty nearly, if 
not altogether ceased. To adduce full proof of such 
amendment in the value of the St. Domingo land, 
it may be only needful to state that some land, 
which once belonged to the St. Domingo estate (a 
part, too, of the 115 acres before-named), was sold, 
the day previous to the penning of this paragraph, in 
building lots, at 14s. & square yard, or, in other 
words, at £3388 the statute acre — a wonderful con- 
trast to the value of the same land in the year 1716, 
w r hich was then only 20s. money down, and Is. ^ 
annum chief rent, ty acre. 

There are some circumstances connected with the 
above-named lease for 1000 years, which are worthy 
to be known, and therefore the following brief outline 
of its history is given. 

In the year 1714, the copyholders of Everton, being 
desirous of enclosing and improving the commons, or 
lands which lay waste in their township, applied to 
the lord (or lady) of the manor, to have the said 
lands leased to them for a certain long period of 
years ; and their request being favourably received, 
a contract was entered into by and between the said 
lord of the manor, together with the trustees of his 
lady, and a deputation of the said copyholders of 



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TENURES OFPROPERTY. 113 

Everton; the conditions of which' contract were 
effected and completed to the satisfaction of both the. 
contracting parties, on the 3d August, 1716, — on 
which day a lease of 1 15 acres of the said lands, for 
1000 years, was formally executed; the particulars 
of which have been already given in the preceding 
pages of this work. 

Soon after procuring the said lease, the copyholders 
of Everton proceeded to divide and apportion the 
lands so leased among themselves ; all the copyholders 
having allotted unto them a proportion of the leased 
lands according to the extent of their respective copy- 
holds ; and it is worthy of remark, that the full mea- 
surement of then- aggregate copyholds differed but little 
in the whole extent from that of the measure of the 
commons or waste lands which were leased for 1000 
years, in the year 1716; so that all the copyholders 
doubled their possessions at Everton, at a cost to each, 
of them on their respective proportions of £1 $- acre, 
money down, and a liability to pay Is. per acre per 
annum, during the whole term — the whole being also, 
liable to 13s. 4d. per annum, the ancient rent paid on 
the commons. 

It may be as well to state that, by an excellent 
recent arrangement, the aforesaid lord's rent, and also 
the 13s. 4d. per annum, is raised by and paid out of 
the rent of a cottage, which was erected a few years 
ago, together with a pinfold adjoining, on a waste spot 
of land near the border or bank at the north-east 
corner of the mere, or public watering-place. 

i 



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114 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

As the copyholders of Everton were proceeding in 
the division of the lands, leased as aforesaid for 1000 
years, it was discovered by Hie people of West Derby, 
that a portion thereof, in extent about 16 acres, 
was part of a common or waste of West Derby, to 
which the copyholders of West Derby laid claim. 
After divers disputes and debates, certain articles were 
agreed on (which may be found in the Appendix), 
by which Everton gave to West Derby 5J acres iw 
land, and paid £20 per acre for 11 acres, which 
the tenants of Everton had enclosed, agreeable to the 
division of the lands of the said lease. But although 
the tenants (or rather the copyholders) of Everton 
at large, bought from the people of West Derby the 
advantages of the said 11 acres of land, for and 
during the term of 1000 years, the said 11 acres 
were left under the jurisdiction of West Derby ; and 
to that township they are still amenable, in regard to 
tithes, taxes, &c. 

West Derby has continued to pay unto Everton 
5s.* annually, which sum is the lord's rent, on the 
5-g- acres of land which were ceded, in land, to West 
Derby, and which 5 J acres are part of and included 
in the said lease of 1000 years — Everton being bound 
by the stipulations of that lease, for the entire duration 
of its term, to pay the whole chief rent. 

The original lease, together with the articles of 
agreement between the copyholders themselves, and 
other documents relative to this material matter touch- 

* Should be 5s. l£d. annually. 



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TENURES OF PROPERTY. 



115 



ing the tenures of Everton, — the lease for 1000 years, 
— may be found in the chest of the township, where 
they are carefully preserved. Copies of some of those 
documents will be found in the Appendix to this 
work. Transfer-titles to this leasehold property are 
made in the usual way of conveying leaseholds, free 
from the forms and customs of a court baron. 

Fancy loves to take long looks through time's tele- 
scope ; and it is certainly a spying far into futurity, 
to anticipate the probable state of Everton 886 years 
hence : but if Liverpool continue to progress as now, 
and should rival London in endurance and extent, 
what a valuable estate will the reversionary inheritor 
have of the lands in Everton, when the lease expires ! 
Upwards of 200 statute acres of Everton land, it is 
probable, will then be closely and compactly covered 
with buildings, of a town-like character, and will 
yield an immense revenue to the heir or heirs of some 
fortunate family. 



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SECTION VI. 



A SKETCH 

OF THE MANNERS, CUSTOMS, AND HABITS OF THE PAST AND 
PRESENT INHABITANTS OF EVERTON; AND OF THEIR 
RECREATIVE AND OTHER EMPLOYMENTS. 



Readers of the present day may deem this section 
prolix, but if the fragile materials of which it is com- 
posed should attain a good round age, the minutue 
will be acceptable to people who may then exist. Let 
it be asked, if a minute record of the manners and 
customs of centuries ago would not be acceptable and 
valuable to ourselves ? Taken, then, in this point of 
view, it ought to stand excused ; at all events, the 
risk is incurred, in the hope that the censure of the 
living may be slight, and the record prove satisfactory 
and useful to those who are as yet in embryo. 

Rude and barbarous were the manners and customs 
of the aborigines of Everton j but of the names and 
nature of their amusements, pastimes, and general 
employments, nothing is now known ; nor can any 
thing be satisfactorily gathered of their particular 
habits, customs, and recreative employments during 



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A SKETCH. 117 

the heptarchy, or even for many centuries after that 
hydra-headed government ceased to rule over the 
people of England ; nor can much be related (at least 
with certainty or explicitness,) of their manners and 
recreations, from the dissolution of the heptarchy down 
to and during the seventeenth century ; for nothing has 
been discovered in the archives of the township which 
bears on these points. The recollections of the oldest 
now living only serve to shew the usages of their own 
times, with a smattering of what had reached their 
ears in their younger days, of the particular practices 
of their immediate progenitors. 

Some seventy or eighty years ago, all the inhabi- 
tants of Everton were plain people, owners and tillers 
of land, mixed occasionally with affluent and other 
settlers, who, with their families, had retired from 
trade, to rusticate, and enjoy themselves at ease, in 
the salubrious air, the rural scenery, and the then 
unsophisticated society of Everton. In those days, 
the upper classes were little removed, either in man- 
ners or mode of life, from the middling, or even the 
humblest class of beings which then resided in the 
township : the main difference between the aristocrats 
and plebeians lay in the former being exonerated from 
labour, whilst the latter were necessitated to undergo 
its fatigues. The table of the wealthy aristocrat was 
daily furnished with a cup of nut-brown, home-brewed 
ale ; whilst that of the labourer and small sub-tenant 
was seldom graced with other beverage than what the 
dairy, the pump, or the well afforded. In those days, 



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118 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

the public houses were open to, and visited by, all 
ranks ; yet the working-man's visits were then, in 
general, " few and far between • " but the landowners, 
and other opulent persons, seldom suffered a night to 
pass without congregating at one or both of the public- 
houses of the township. It is true that in those days, 
as now, there were some inveterate sots among the 
lower orders, who would entrench themselves in the 
midst of the pewter-pots of an alehouse, and remain 
drinking whilst a maravedi was left in their pouches, 
and until the little reason they once possessed was 
for a time destroyed. To preach against such prac- 
tices would be about as wise as the attempt to raise 
the voice to an audible pitch during a thunder-storm. " 
The result of a night's debauch with the old lords of 
the soil of Everton, was seldom more than a next- 
morning-qualm, or muddled head; and, like old 
Toby Philpot, they fared well daily, gradually grew 
fat, and could afford to be prodigal, both of money 
and time ; but a poor man was constantly taught that 
he could not afford to waste either. 

It may serve as a specimen of the manners, and of 
the mental attainments, of the highest class of society 
at Everton, some eighty years ago, to give a descrip- 
tive outline of some occurrences which took place at 
an evening meeting of the nobles of the township, 
mixed with some of their boon companions of Liver- 
pool, held at a public-house, which in those days 
stood near the late beacon. The fumes of tobacco, ale, 
and taciturnity were, at most times, the principal com- 






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A SKETCH, 119 

modities to be met with at these meetings : it chanced 

however, one day, that a certain Thomas o'th H 's 

became inspired with a flow of eloquence ; the sub- 
ject is immaterial, the speech itself being lost to 
posterity, for, at the epoch of these events, reporting 
had not been invented; the force, pith, marrow, and 

classical beauties of Thomas o'th H 's speech are, 

consequently, buried in flbe sea of oblivion. In the 
heat and energy of his . peroration, the eloquent 

Thomas o'th H 's, unfortunately advanced an 

assertion which, by some of his auditors, was deemed 
a sin against veracity. Now, in the days here alluded 
to, the English language was generally spoken at 
Everton in a plain and unadorned manner \ contra- 
diction had not then been taught politeness, negation 
was in a natural state, and difference in opinion was 
of a sturdy, knock-' em-down character; the modern 
reader, therefore, must neither be shocked nor sur- 
prised at what follows. 

One William Ripley, who was an eminent grocer 
of Liverpool, rose to reply to the rare and erudite 

eloquence of Thomas o'th H 's ; Ripley's oratory 

was almost altogether confined to that class or style 
of speechifying termed monosyllabic. Having fairly 
steadied himself on Ms legs, Ripley, with elegance 
and energy, addressed the last speaker thus ; " Thou 
liest ! " and thereupon sat down, amidst thunders of 
laudatory ejaculations, uttered in the pure phraseology 
of the times. 

Ripley, however, was not permitted to feast long 



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120 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

on the honey of popular applause ; for one Wm. R., 
a legitimate legislator of Everton, speedily arose from 
his seat, on the anti-Ripley bench, and after sundry * 
ineffectual attempts to stifle and subdue a vile and 
impertinent hiccup, at length assumed a wise look, 
and delivered himself of two or three portentous 
puffs ; in due time, too, his eloquence arose through 
certain guttural passages to the root of his tongue, 
and thence rushing to its tip, thus questioned the 
bold and evidently self-satisfied Ripley. " Dus ta' 

ca' Tummus o'th H 's a liar?" "Aye," replied 

the valiant Ripley. Then, foaming with fury, and 
almost choked with the posse of angry words which 
-his exasperated brain thrust, pell-mell, into his 
throat, the doughty adversary of the still undaunted 
Ripley in " terrific silence stood : " at length, a few 
emphatic hems disentangled the sentences which had 
most unceremoniously jostled together in his wind- 
pipe, and one of them escaped, embodied in a roar of 
which a bull would not have been ashamed, bellowing 
in the ears of the now half-frighted Ripley, " Then 
thou'rt a bear!" 

Plaudit on plaudit followed, to reward this elegant 
home-thrust specimen of rhetoric. The late bold 
Ripley quailed under the fulmination, and for some 
time sat crest-fallen, whilst, to conceal his fears and 
feelings of discomfiture, he buried his features under 
a cloud which he had created by sharp and successive 
whiffs of his pipe, and, like many other discomfited 
heroes, made frequent applications to his friendly cup 



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A SKETCH. 121 

for consolation. After these, and such like occasional 
bursts of elegant eloquence, the nobles of Everton 
would again bury themselves in the luxurious fumes 
of tobacco, and in Utopian dreams, which ever and 
anon arose in their abstract fits of taciturnity, w r ould 
thus remain until the hour arrived for each to depart 
to his respective home. But, occasionally, the old 
nobles of Everton recreated themselves with cards, 
principally playing the game of brag ; at which game, 
some of them have been known to sit, waning against 
cankered care, and cheating old father Time, for three 
entire and successive days and nights; feeding by 
snatches, and keeping their lower limbs warm by 
suffering the cinders to spread and arise in heaps 
around them, in which they embedded their legs, as 
rumour says, nearly knee-deep. Can modern card- 
playing match this ? — it can — it does, and far beyond 
it; that is, in consequences and detrimental results; 
a few minutes now spent in Everton at card-playing 
causes many a guinea to change masters; whereas 
our homely, honest old lords seldom, if ever, rose 
from the hardest of their carding campaigns the 
gainers or losers of more than a few shillings, or even 
pence. 

Although the nobles of Everton occasionally in- 
dulged in the game of brag, yet, eighty years ago, 
cards were little known, and but seldom played, save 
indeed at Clmstmas time, and perchance by a few 
dowagers and old maids at some rare and ceremonious 
tunes of assembling together ; but visits of ceremony 



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122 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

were infrequent, whilst those of festivity were strictly 
periodical — always at Christmas, and occasionally at 
other holiday seasons. The females of those good, 
old, by-gone days, constantly busied themselves 
with domestic duties, and the men with out-door 
affairs : mothers then reared their daughters more for 
use than for shew; and the fingers of the richest 
youthful females of the township were more accustomed 
to pudding-making than pianoforteising ; to plain 
sewing, than to the now fashionable employments of 
embroidering and toy-making : lasses, then, had the 
rudiments of learning engrafted on their minds ; the 
Bible, and perchance a ballad, were nearly the extent 
of their reading ; writing was seldom called for or 
practised; as to arithmetic, they seldom found it 
needful to know more of it than " how many blue 
beans make jive." 

And yet, with what would now be called a lamen- 
table lack of learning (as without dispute it certainly 
maybe deemed), the lasses of Everton, in olden times, 
made excellent wives, and were exemplary mothers ; 
to state that they were good house-wives might, in 
these highly civilized days, be considered as only 
equivocally meritorious, — but the man who wishes to 
enjoy real domestic happiness, will select a partner 
of this kind, in preference to an accomplished bas r 
bleu. In those days, the lasses of Everton were 
diamonds, pure from the mine, capable of receiving 
liigher polish, it is true, but not the less intrinsically 
valuable for being only set in the "mould of nature:" 



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A SKETCH, 123 

happy was the man who became possessed of those 
natural diamonds, for it was generally in his power to 
give to them the hue and polish his heart desired. 
As to the young men of Everton, they were indeed 
insufficiently instructed; for even the better orders 
knew little of books in general, and of the belles lettres 
they were profoundly ignorant. 

Times are, however, much altered, u learning now 
lies in every one's way, and every one may find it ; " — 
time must shew which extreme will be most to the 
advantage of society. 

There is a calm, smooth, conscience-soothing 
feeling constantly reposing on the minds of all 
who live as did the good people of Everton during 
the period now alluded to; it was then the practice 
to go to bed with the sun, and to rise with or 
before him : from the roosting time of the feathered 
tribe, until chanticleer strained his pipe in the morn, 
peace and silence held undisturbed sway in the 
township : devoid of care, and scarcely knowing 
guilt, even by name, the worthy inhabitants of 
Everton then reposed in quiet and safety, daily 
arising from refreshing slumbers, hale and hearty, to 
perform their diurnal duties. Let it not be imagined, 
however, that the people of Everton in those so highly 
lauded days, were all immaculate — no such tiling; 
but to the majority of them this picture of almost 
primitive character and purity belongs : there were a 
few black sheep in the township ; and Bacchus could 
then, as well as now, command a small company of 



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124 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

votaries. During the winters of the olden time, the 
cheerful fire-sides of Everton were generally sur- 
rounded by the happy individuals of their respective 
families, and often augmented by the presence of 
neighbours and friends; it was then that the needle 
and distaff were sedulously plied by the females, and 
the old men smoked then* pipes, whilst most of the 
young men sat mum-chancing, as it is emphatically 
called, or, in plain English, somewhat sillily-silent; not 
feeling bold enough, in the presence of their elders, 
to advance an opinion, but reserving their ideas for the 
days when they should be called upon to play their 
parts as masters of families : but they were not all of 
this taciturn cast, for some smart natural sayings and 
sprinklings of genuine mother wit would occasionally 
escape their lips ; love, too, would sometimes inspire 
them with eloquence, and in practical courtship they 
went far beyond the youth of the present day; 
romping matches, burglarious depredations on the 
attire, and felonious attacks on the lasses' lips, were 
much more frequent than now ; that is, such things 
were practised in the full view and observance of the 
world, whilst in these days, it is to be feared, many 
a deep design is gilt over with a shew of decorum. 

In the olden time, virtue had scarcely ever to 
lament the loss of an Everton handmaiden, and 
neither stigma nor stain has rumour cast on the 
fame and reputation of any native daughter of the 
township; at all events, no croaking collector of 
scandal has as yet whispered it into the ears of the 






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A SKETCH. 125 

compiler of this treatise, where every tale of vice, 
which has been deposited, shall remain hidden and 
entombed. No record or tradition avers that any 
Thais was bom at Everton, though the township's 
books are sullied with charges of female frailties ; but 
they are those of stranger domestics, aliens, or tem- 
porary sojourners. Sunday was strictly observed as 
a holy-d&y ; to travel on business, or to take pleasure- 
able excursions, on that day, was considered sinful; 
such undertakings were therefore never entered upon, 
and indeed not even thought of, by the late genera- 
tions of the inhabitants of Everton. To honour the 
day, by decorating themselves in their best apparel ; 
to go regularly twice, if not oftener, to church; to 
take their moderate and sober meals in quiet and 
thankfulness; and to fill up the portions of time, 
not devoted to piety and prayer, with pleasant, salu- 
brious walks, in their gardens, meadows, and high- 
roads, or, when in doors, seated in conclave, or alone, 
consulting that holy book, the Bible ; — such were the 
Sabbath-day employments of a great majority of the 
unsophisticated beings who dwelt in Everton seventy 
or eighty years ago. 

People of the present day may deem the manners 
and employments of their predecessors to have been 
vulgar and tame, and may stigmatize the good old 
mode of passing through life, as one dull round of 
sameness ; but such sameness was as beneficial, and 
conducive to morality, as are sober and refreshing 
draughts of pure water to the physical system* But 



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126 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

where is the pastoral population of Everton now? 
Where are its robust, hardy, and healthy children 
of agriculture — its hale, vigorous, cheerful young 
men — its neat, yet plainly attired, artless, blushing, 
ruddy, merry maidens ? — gone — all gone ! Many 
of them are removed by death, some are converted 
into other things by fashion, and a few, perhaps, are 
sojourners in other lands. 

Together with the face of the soil, the manners, 
customs, habits, employments, and amusements of the 
people of Everton have become wonderfully changed, 
almost to the very reverse of former usages. Their 
sports and amusements during the early and middle 
parts of the last century, were similar to those in 
which the people of the county at large indulged. 
The fair sex had then few exclusive amusements; 
and as to the sports and plays of the younger females, 
tradition only speaks of such as my lady-queen-ann, 
chuck-kemels, or five-stones, and a few other such 
like games, in which female children used to engage 
at their parents' thresholds, or on a sunny bank, un- 
mixed with the- other sex. But women groivn had 
scarcely any amusement in which they indulged 
themselves, distinct from family society. 

Boys diverted themselves with the usual varieties 
of spontaneous mischief, and, at fixed times and 
seasons, indulged in the games of hoops, tops, mar- 
bles, balls, kites, pop-guns, &c. ; as they approached 
toward manhood, they took pleasure in congregating, 
together in large bodies, to engage in the games 



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A SKETCH. 127 

of prison-bar, quoits, leap-frog, foot-and-a-half, and 
bandy; and when they arrived at the full plenitude 
of strength, they would betake themselves to wres- 
tling, cudgel-playing, and hurling, or play at football, 
skittles, pitch-and-hustle, cross-and-pile, &c. How- 
ever vulgar such pastimes as publicly grinning 
through a horse-collar, running races in sacks, and 
eating scalding-hot porridge, may now be deemed, 
such things have been known to take place in 
the township, and very frequently on the borders 
of Everton. These and such like sports afforded 
high gratification to the beholders of those days, 
and to some who were not of the lower orders, 
for many a young and wealthy heiress> and many 
a rich, hopeful heir might, eighty years ago, have 
been found in the crowd of spectators at such sports. 
Mummers and morris-dancers were much in vogue ; 
both sexes would sometimes mingle in the "mum- 
mer's merry mazes;" but, to the credit of the fair 
sex of Everton be it recorded, the female characters, 
required in mummer-performances, were generally 
enacted by individuals of the other sex, decorated 
in grotesque attire* The performers, on such occa- 
sions, wore masks, under cover of wliich a licence 
would be frequently taken to proceed beyond the 
boundaries of modesty and decorum. The barbarous, 
but now nearly exploded practices (ci-devant amuse- 
ments) of bull and bear-beating, were greatly encou- 
raged and indulged in by our ancestors : the still 



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128 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

more cruel pastime (horrid misnomer !) of cock- 
fighting, was a favourite and frequently-recurring 
practice ; especially at Shrovetide, when poor chan- 
ticleer was doomed to be the victim of double cruelty, 
being not only frequently fought, but also tied to 
stakes, and cast at with clubs, for a certain sum given 
at each throw. 

Mischievous urchins existed in those days, who, in 
the fitting seasons (as is still their practice), warred 
against the feathered tribe, with trap, net, and bird- 
lime; eggs and young birds were sought for by 
them with avidity, and wantonly and cruelly sacri- 
ficed. 

All kinds of game were followed by sportsmen, 
who with the hound run down prey, and with the 
gun committed havoc dire, amongst both the feathered 
and the furry tribes. From youthhood to mature age, 
the sports of angling were enjoyed ; but meagre were 
the spoils the township afforded within itself, to the 
huntsman or piscator. The hazle coppices were 
visited, at proper seasons, by the youth of both sexes; 
and not ^infrequently would single pairs, when " going 
a nutting/' take the opportunity to seat themselves 
under the hazle-bush, and there sigh, say, and listen 
to fond amorous tales. 

Bonfires were annually ignited, at Everton, on 
each 5th of November, from the time of Guy Faux 
until some twenty years ago, when the practice was 
discontinued by order of the magistrates. The prin- 



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A SKETCH.- 



129 



cipal bonfire* was .that which annually* blazed in the 
open space of ground that was, in old times, almost 
opposite to the ancient town's smithy : the place is 
not distant more than fifty yards north-north-east of 
the present coffee-house, and is at the same distance 
in the east from the plot of land on the slope of the 
Brow, now enclosed with stone work and handsome 
iron railing, in the midst of which plot stands a 
diminutive stone-jug — the Everton bridewell, t 

Fun and frolic, mirth and mischief, were as V'busy 
us bees," on the bonfire nights^ at Everton : all 
classes flocked around the bright blaze: crack! crack 1 
in the lasses' ears went many a ball-less discharge from 
pistol and gun; serpents hissed along, and singed 
the hem of many a petticoat; and oft were heard 
repeated screams, partly feigned, after rapid dis- 
charges of the dancing crackers. Then the Everton 
lads, aye, and many of the lasses too, enjoyed them- 
selves at the pic-nic feast of many choice tid-bits, 
brought to be devoured at the bonfire's cheerful 
border, whilst in the embers they roasted that essen- 
tial root — the potatoe ; nor were the modicums of 
beer absent from the table which mother earth libe- 
rally furnished. For a long succession of years, the 
night of the 5th of November was considered and 
held as a period of enjoyment and jollity; and there 
is still living in the township a very worthy and 
respectable personage,* who loves to tell, somewhat 
boastingly, that he was for many successive years 

* Mr. James Holmes. V 
K 



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130 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

the captain of the Everton bonfire. It is seen in the 
town's books, that for a long succession of years a 
sum of from Is. to 3s. was regularly and annually 
given " to the lads on the 5th November." In the 
town's accounts, a charge of the sum given has 
always (when paid to the bonfire-lads) been passed 
at the meeting as a regular matter : the. practice of 
thus giving the lads the town's money for bonfires 
seems to have been discontinued since the year 
1811, that year being the last in which such charge 
is made. In the year 1806, 5s. was given to the 
lads, instead of a bonfire. 

To delineate the gradual change from primitive, 
pastoral manners, to those of the present day, would 
be a minute, trite, and superfluous task ; it is better, 
then, to strike into a brief descriptive account of the 
customs, habits, and employments of the existing in- 
habitants of Everton. Much as the surface of the 
soil and general appearance of the township have 
been altered, they are not more changed than the 
modem usages and habits of its present society differ 
from those of ancient times. 

The hind and labouring husbandman have now 
but little agricultural employment at Everton; this 
class of labourers having become jacks-of-all-trades, 
performing the tasks of gardeners, valets, road- 
repairers, and jobbers, — in short, thorough-paced jour- 
neymen of all work; whilst the wives and daughters 
of these labourers are washers and manglers of linen, 
managers of petty shops, and domestic drudges. The 



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A SKETCH. 131 

majority of the labourers of Everton are industrious, 
honest, sober, and faithful; but, as is the case in 
most places, some may be found who are too fond of 
paying their devoirs at the shrine of Bacchus. The 
lower orders of Everton have recently had a great 
accession to their number, by the settlement in the 
township of many labouring persons, who reside on 
the borders and parts of Everton which approximate 
to and join Liverpool; they are altogether a new 
class of beings in the township, nothing at all re- 
moved in their habits and employments from those of 
the lower and working classes of all large towns; 
There are now many trades-people establishing 
themselves at Everton — deserving, useful classes of 
people ; and there are also some few establishments 
of small dealers and shopkeepers, whose stores afford 
great accommodation, inasmuch as they satisfy many 
wants which otherwise must have been supplied at 
Liverpool ; but there is not, as yet, one shop of 
eminence in Everton. 

A number of persons engaged in the minor de- 
partments of commerce, and some mercantile and 
professional clerks, reside at Everton ; some of whom 
only make it their place of lodging, others take a 
hasty stride home to their meals, and at night again 
delightedly repair to their wives and families. Per- 
sons thus circumstanced can only, on Sabbath-days 
or .superior holidays, spend an entire day in full 
domestic unity and sociality. 

Ascending on the scale of society, the merchant 



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132 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

must haYe the next place here. Many of these reside 
at Everton, some of whom cany on business in a 
humble way, and within moderate limits, whilst others 
are extensive traders, whose affairs are of mighty 
magnitude. It is to be understood, however, that 
the merchants who reside at Everton are almost, 
without a single exception, merchants of Liverpool, 
but who have chosen Everton as a most desirable 
place of residence for themselves and families. 

It is this class of persons, principally, that has 
made Everton what it is \ their wealth and attention 
have transformed a spot which, not long ago, was 
little better than an unsightly common — a neglected 
waste — into a modern Arcadia, not so productive, 
perhaps, as was Arcadia of old, yet little inferior in 
beauty and salubrity to that highly extolled region of 
antiquity. 

The merchants residing at Everton at the present 
time, maybe seen "plodding their anxious way," from 
their mansions to their offices, at all times between 
the hours of eight and eleven in the morning of 
every day, but that of the Sabbath. The greater 
part of these gentlemen usually walk to town, al- 
though there are but few of them who do not keep 
either two or four-wheeled carriages, of some struc- 
ture or other, from the light gig to the gorgeous 
heavy-bodied coach. Many keep two or more of 
such carriages ; but not any persons, at present 
residing at Everton, run their carnages with four 
•horses, except . indeed upon casual and very rare 



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A SKETCH. 133" 

occasions. The practice of the gentry ; of Everton 
walking to town is as conducive to their own health 
as convenient and agreeable to their families, the; 
carriages being at liberty to take them on excursions 
of business or pleasure, or to visit the shrines of 
fashion, or to leave their cards-of-compliment at the 
doors of their acquaintance and — the word will some- 
times apply — friends. 

The dinner-hour of the gentry at Everton is seldom 
much before five in the afternoon, and often later; 
there are some few persons, however, and who rank 
high in their line of transactions, that dine at the 
unfashionable hour of one or two. Many jespectable 
individuals take their dinner about the hour of three; 
these are principally such as have retired from 
business, or who are otherwise independent. 

It is the custom of those who are engaged in 
commmercial pursuits, and who dine at the earlier 
hours, to. return to business after dinner ; but they 
.who take late dinners seldom visit Liverpool in the 
evening, unless it be to join a private party of 
pleasure, or to attend a concert, or the theatre. On 
a par with the chief merchants may be placed several 
eminent brokers, who also reside at Everton, whose 
talent, industry, and wealth approach near to an 
equality with those of their great mercantile neigh-- 
hours. The clergy, medical men, and lawyers of 
Everton -are- few in number, but highly respectable 
in their respective spheres, exemplary in their con- 
duct, regular and indefatigable in the performance of 



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134 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

their respective duties, and truly useful in their avoca- 
tions ; nor need any exception be made to this well- 
merited eulogy on their character. There are not 
any family of nobility, at this time, residing at Ever- 
ton ; Prince Rupert, and Prince William (now Duke) 
of Gloucester, are the only personages of royal blood 
that have been known to make Everton their tempo- 
rary place of abode. 

The manners of the greater part of the higher and 
of the middle classes of Everton are bland, courteous, 
and polished ; and even those of the lower grades are 
much improved, and are making some approaches to 
civilization. As to the middle classes of society, their 
manners and. conduct are characteristically stamped 
with sound sense and decorum ; in their general inter- 
course with their neighbours, they are hospitable and 
friendly ; and in their personal appearance, neatness 
and comfort are most becomingly blended together: 
as to * their internal arrangements, they might be 
almost termed essays in cleanness, order, and even, 
elegance; and their domestic economy is regulated 
on a scale which enables them to provide most satis- 
torily all that their own wants and comforts require ; 
to entertain their friends respectably, and even sump- 
tuously ; and to perform deeds of general benevolence 
and charity. 

If the term amusements be taken strictly, and in its 
literal sense, the people of Everton may be said to 
have enjoyed but a very limited share, either in times 
past, or at the present day; but there are certain 



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A SKETCH. 135 

ways of employing time, which are recreative and 
refreshing to body and mind, although mirth may not 
at such times mix with our modes and moods : the 
acceptation of the term amusements is therefore, in this 
context, to be considered, and to have allowed unto it, 
as general and diffuse a meaning as our language 
will afford. 

At the present day, retirement from the bustle of 
trade, to t enjoy social and domestic pleasures, seems to 
be the ne plus ultra of the enjoyments of the people 
of Everton ; and latterly, a sober, not to say sombre 
shade, has been cast over the social manners and con- 
duct of a great part of the inhabitants of the township, 
many of 'whom have become as systematic, uniform, 
and regular in plainly attiring their persons, and in 
their regularity of attending to pious duties, as are the 
fraternities or sects termed Methodists and Friends* 

Of the amusements of the lower classes of Everton, 
little can be said, for little or none do they enjoy. A 
spirit has lately arisen in the land, that has instigated 
the magistracy, and other high and influential persons, 
to curb, restrain, and almost absolutely forbid, the 
lowly and humble of society from indulging in any 
pastimes Avhatever. Everton was never known to 
hold fairs or wakes, or such like merry-maMngs, within 
its own limits ; but in the neighbouring townships, at 
certain fixed periods, such meetings were frequently 
held, and at most of such merry-makings, the lads 
and lasses of Everton seldom failed to attend. For a 
great number of years it was the custom and practice 



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136 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

of the common people of Liverpool and its vicinage 
to assemble annually, at Easter-tide, to recreate them- 
selves at a place called Folly-field — a field in Liver- 
pool, and which adjoined the south border of Ever- 
ton. The magistrates of Liverpool have, however, 
% quashed the custom; " for, in the year 1819, Folly- 
fair Easter-meeting was forbidden to be held; and 
never . since that time have the people assembled to 
enjoy themselves in that quarter. 

To Folly-fair the common people of Everton cer- 
tainly went; but owing, as it was said, to its licentious- 
ness, it was abolished, and is now almost forgotten, 
although a dozen years have not passed away since it 
was at the height of its notoriety. 

The Folly was neftr the confines of Everton, and, 
therefore, it is deemed reconcileable to the plan and 
object "of this treatise to introduce the following 
extract from, a letter, written by an elderly gentleman, 
and which was intended for insertion in a Liverpool 
newspaper; but the contribution was not sent, nor 
has it been published until now. 
r " The Folly was a low building, with a few rooms 
for the family, and two or three small ones for the 
accommodation of the public oh the ground floor ; at 
the west end there was a large tower, and from the 
erection of this part, the place got the name of 
' Folly ' — the inhabitants of the neighbourhood sup- 
posing the proprietor to be a simpleton. 
m " The site of the Folly was near the south entrance 
to St. Anne's-street; the building' had a narrow 



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A SKETCH. 137 

passage, which led to it from a (then) dirty lane/ 
that ran towards Derby — the. same road, but now 
much improved and widened, is called Upper- 
Islington. 

.- "The Folly was noted for delicious cakes and 
choice ale, and forms were placed in the court or 
fronfrground, for the accommodation of guests. 
• "This house was much frequented on Sunday 
evenings and on holidays, and more particularly 
about the time of Easter, for at that season a beverage 
was brewed at the Folly, composed of ale enriched 
with spices, called braggot, and the holiday-folk 
flocked from Liverpool town to quaff this their 
favourite beverage : many of the guests seated them- 
selves on the top of the Folly, from whence they 
enjoyed a most charming prospect of Liverpool, 
Everton, and the river Mersey. 

" The Folly was taken down, and there was not any 
assemblages of persons in that neighbourhood for 
some years afterwards, except indeed the walks and 
airings taken by young persons on holidays, and 
particularly at Easter-tide, when the season frequently 
tempted them in crowds to creep toward the country ; 
many youngsters, too,, at that season flocked to the 
open grounds, near ; the site of the old Folly, to play 
at trap, &c. &c, and to indulge in .many such like 
harmless amusements. 

" It was not until some public-houses were opened 
on the road near to where the Folly stood, that the 
people again resorted to that neighbourhood to drink 



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138 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

and make merry at Easter-tide ; and then first arose 
the name of Folly-fair. 

" From these last named meetings originated the 
present licentious and immoral practices that now 
annually take place on the roads leading from Liver- 
pool to Derby and Low-hill; and the magistrates are 
highly to be commended for endeavouring to suppress 
the disorderly, riotous proceedings which now dis- 
grace that neighbourhood j proceedings that bear no 
resemblance to the original quiet and well regulated 
practices that were wont to be followed at the ancient 
house of entertainment, called the Folly." 

From time immemorial wakes have been and still 
are annually held at West Derby; it would appeal*, 
however, that neither now nor formerly have they 
been much frequented by the people of Everton. 
Rude and rough are the sports at Derby wakes, bull- 
baiting, and other cruel practices, having formed 
the chief amusements; for many years it was the 
custom to drive a bull from these wakes into the 
streets of Liverpool, until a most audacious set of 
revellers actually drove one of the baited Derby bulls 
into a box of the theatre, in Williamson-square ; the 
act, however, proved so obnoxious to the people of 
Liverpool, as to cause them to apply to the magis- 
trates, who at once put a stop to the practice of bring- 
ing the bulls from Derby wakes into the town's 
crowded streets. 

Occasionally the common people are indulged with 
a sight-seeing occurrence at Everton ; but they are so 



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A SKETCH. 139 

near the tempting allurements of Liverpool, that the 
lack of places of amusement is not heeded. The rural 
dance is now obsolete; indeed, at this day, there is 
scarcely a vestige left of rural pastime, or pastoral 
recreation, in all Everton. 

The sports, amusements, and employments of the 
upper and middle classes of society, now residing at 
Everton, are so similar, that it may be allowed to 
treat of them under the same head. 

As already stated, society has, of late, assumed 
a sombre character at Everton; numbers of its 
residents spending a great part of their leisure time 
in conversational intercourse, not only with their 
living neighbours and acquaintance, but with their 
inanimate, yet not less sincere friends, their hooks. 
A book society has been formed, upon principles, and 
under regulations, which give it a useful effect, 
with the least possible pecuniary outlay; indeed it 
may be said, that the highest class of amusement, 
blended with the advantages to be derived from the 
expansion of knowledge, and the general cultivation 
of the mental faculties, is purchased by the members 
of the Everton book society in the most economical 
manner, that of a public library excepted, — which 
Everton does not, at present, possess ; but in good 
time, there is little doubt, this want will be supplied. 
Unless the male gentry travel to some distance from 
their own township, they will have little chance of 
enjoying what are called field sports, for there are 
scarcely any foxes or hares, and little or none of any 



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140 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

kind of feathered game, to be met with in Everton V 
entire township. Nor are there in Everton any 
lakes, rivers, or rivulets, or other waters worthy to cast 
a net or line into ; there are indeed a few ponds, 
some of which perhaps are. stored indifferently with 
small fish, but even such may only be found in private 
gardens and pleasure grounds, and are consequently, 
in the strictest sense of the word, preserved. 

Archery has occasionally been" practised as a 
pastime, both by the young and by adults, at 
Everton, where associations of archers have been 
formed, composed of the gentry and their neighbours; 
but the spirit that originated such associations has 
ever proved feeble and short-lived. - 
. The gentry of Everton have frequently evinced 
a disposition to make a display of fire- works ; but no 
exhibitions worthy of record have resulted from their 
efforts; and even those few public displays of the 
pyrotechnic art which have taken place, within the 
last few years, proved little other than mere '} flashes 
in the pan." 

For a long period previous to the year 1814 there 
had not been a bowling-green in the township, when 
James Atherton, Esq., attached one to a large com- 
modious edifice near to the church. •• When that 
.edifice was first occupied, it was a house of public 
entertainment, known by the name of " St. George's 
'Hotel;" and to that hotel the bowling-green was 
attached, until the former was converted into a board- 
ing-school, in the year 1822, and the bowling-green 



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A SKETCH. J 41 

became the play-ground of the pupils. Thus deprived 
of the place in which the Evertonians had been wont 
to recreate themselves, a number of respectable per- 
sons, in the year 1822, established by subscription the 
present bowling-green, which is at the east part of a 
spot or locality marked 19, i, on the map, at a little 
distance due west of the mere. It is said that there 
were other bowling-greens at Everton formerly ; but 
if so, it w T ould appear that they proved neither attrac- 
tive nor profitable : the present subscription bowling- 
green," however, promises to answer the expectations 
of its founders. 

Of late years, during the seasons of frost, a number 
of gentlemen have assembled, almost daily, on the 
mere, to engage in the Scottish pastime of curling. 
. The in-door amusements of the gentry of Everton 
may be comprised under the general heads of card- 
parties, routs, dances, conversational-meetings, and 
social and convivial assemblies, at the dinner, tea, and 
supper tables. Concerts are not now given at Ever- 
ton, except occasionally on a very small scale, when 
they are held at private houses \ but there was one 
society deserving of record — a society that has few 
parallels in the unison of sentiment, friendship, and 
stability, and which existed for a quarter of a century; 
this was a quartette party, whose meetings were regu- 
larly held weekly, on the evenings of Thursday, 
except when sickness or sorrow caused temporary 
interruptions. Death has made lamentable breaches 
in the ranks of this musical phalanx, though until the 



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142 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

present time other members were procured to supply 
the . places of the removed, — but the society is now 
broken up. It may not be amiss to state, that the 
long endurance of this musical society may be attri- 
buted to the prudent determination of its members, 
and which was strictly adhered to, of not luxuriously 
catering to the appetite, or to any of the grosser 
senses, confining their exertions to please the ear, 
and harmonise the passions: they limited their re- 
freshments to coffee, and bread, with its butyra- 
ceous concomitants ; sparingly, very sparingly indeed, 
did they indulge in the cordial cup, and no dainty 
delicacies ever smoked on their boards. With these 
sons of harmony, the selected evenings were strictly 
dedicated to Apollo ; nor did late hours, or excess of 
any kind, ever sully their truly harmonious meetings. 
It is reasonable to assume that the genius of music 
often hovered over the domicile of Mr. Drinkwater, 
and with pleasure tarried there, to listen to the "con- 
cord of sweet sounds : " and when death shall have 
unstrung the harps of all who used to join this harmo- 
nious band, still will the genius of music, as he lingers 
over the well remembered spot, bestow a tributary 
sigh, and chaunt a prayer-hymn to the throne of 
grace, that the souls of his departed devotees may find 
rest, peace, and happiness in heaven. 

An attempt was made, in November, 1814, soon 
after the erection of the church at Everton, to hold 
an oratorio there : the price of a ticket was fifteen 
shillings, which admitted the possessor to two days' 



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A SKETCH. 143 

performances ; but the attempt was unsuccessful, and 
resulted in loss and disappointment to its projectors 
and conductors. 

About twenty years ago, some attempts were made 
to establish public assemblies at Everton, where the 
aged might recreate themselves with cards, and the 
young with "tripping on the light fantastic toe." 
The attempt, at first, promised tolerable success, but 
the number of frequenters annually becoming less, and 
dwindling into insignificance, the project was altoge- 
ther abandoned. Those assemblies were held at the 
Everton Coffee-house, on the Brow, and were as much 
frequented by the people of Liverpool, as by the inha- 
bitants of Everton. About the same period, one or 
two grand balls were given at the coffee-house, by 
bachelor-gentlemen, who had received civic honours. 
The expenses incurred by the mock-magistrates 
afforded them scarcely any other reward than deri- 
sion's smile. 

Of the existing in-door amusements of the gentry 
of Everton, routs must have precedence, and routs are 
not infrequently held at Everton, at which the num- 
ber of visitors materially varies. Sometimes, at such 
meetings, a snug party of half-a-dozen assembles ; in 
general, however, the number is greater, extending 
to twenty, fifty, or more ; when the visitors are very 
numerous, they, of course, squeeze themselves into 
pleasure's saloons, and, in such cases, fresh air is 
sometimes as precious as it was in the never-to-be- 
forgotten prison-cell of Calcutta. The employment 






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144 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

of time at the Everton evening parties is, in some 
instances, in conversation only, but more frequently 
with cards; sometimes music and singing are the 
order of such nights ; and often, particularly in the 
cold season, "dancing devours the merry hours;" 
whilst at other times, all these employments are pro- 
gressing simultaneously under one roof, and on the 
same evening. The refreshments served at such 
meetings accord with the convenience, capability, and 
inclination of the host or hostess, and are generally 
studiously produced to meet the taste of the guests. 
At some parties, tea and tea-bread only are offered ; 
this kind of party has received the ill-merited satirical 
title of "tea and turn-out" At other parties, to the 
tea and coffee, rich cake and wine are added; and 
not unfrequently the visitor is treated with viands 
more substantial, introduced on trays, which are gene- 
rally covered with sandwiches, slices of cold meat, 
patties, and pies of fruit and meat, together with 
custards, jellies, and glasses sparkling with wine, or 
foaming with malt liquor ; and generally, when part- 
ing time comes, good night is drank in a cordial spirit 
cup, or a glass of generous wine. 

But a practice is now very prevalent, at these even- 
ing parties, of seating the guests at a supper-board, 
sometimes moderately, covered, but too often loaded, 
with many delicacies of the season. At such supper- 
parties, conviviality becomes the order of the hour; 
tongues are unloosed, that previously seemed inca- 
pable of motion, by the all-powerful effects of sociality 



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A SKETCH. 



145 



and good cheer j it is then that many, who at other 
times are accounted silent, sedate, and sober persons, 
often change their outward characters. Starch and 
demure personages will, at these hospitable meetings, 
lay aside the cloak in which convenience, interest, 
habit, or hypocrisy had wrapped them, to play the 
merry-andrew, spout out witticisms, " or promulgate 
sarcasms, inuendoes, and jokes of every grade, from 
the excellent to the despicable. But the majority of 
the guests at an Everton suppering, it is willingly and 
truly avowed, are good, hearty subjects; and indeed, 
taking them in the main, the men are honest, and the 
lasses bonny. The pleasure of the evening is fre- 
quently enhanced by the songs of amateur cantators 
and cantatrices, and the strains of essayists, who, 
though they are not highly-gifted votaries of Apollo, 
are listened to with good humour and complacency, 
and generally, with or without desert, rewarded with 
applause. 

Sometimes, at these supper-tables, talented and ra- 
tionally-disposed minds exchange, reciprocate, and dis- 
seminate learned lore ; but, be the mood what it may, 
conversation, singing, good eating, and as good drink- 
ing, are the constant adjuncts of the Everton suppers 
under consideration, where cankered care never dares 
to intrude, and even old father Time seems bribed to 
stand still ; the sly old rogue, however, moves onward, 
as. the guests discover, when, at long -last, the reluc- 
tant and lingering question is put, " How goes the 
enemy?" or, in other words, "What's the hour?" 

L 



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146 HISTORY OF EVERTON, 

On the evenings of routs, and of set supperings, 
at Everton, cards are almost invariably introduced; 
the game of whist is then generally played by the 
adults, especially by the males; whilst the ladies, 
for the most part, particularly those of a certain 
age,, prefer that of quadrille, played, almost without 
exception, in the improved way, under the name of 
preference, and occasionally, but very rarely, in that 
still more advanced stage of complexity, called 
mogul. 

The young people of Everton, of both sexes, are 
not over much addicted to card-playing 5 and when 
they do sit down to cards, it is generally to play at 
what are called round-games, such as loo, pope, 
speculation, intrigue-and-matrimony, camat, com- 
merce, &c. The younger branches of the Everton 
gentry are not averse to indulge occasionally in the 
good old romping sports of blind-man-buff, hunt-the- 
slipper, hide-and-seek, tick-and-touch-wood, &c. ; 
and are delighted to enter into the more roguish 
games of forfeit. Ah ! who are there that cannot with 
delight call to mind the joy, the pleasure, the happy 
carelessness, and the primitive innocence of those days, 
when they themselves participated in such sports?. 
Can they repress the sigh of regret that such enjoy- 
ments are for them no more? But although from 
the adult advanced in life, from the aged, and from 
the infirm, such innocent, sportive joys are withheld, 
let them still rejoice and be glad that then- children, 
and children's children, can enjoy and revel in those 



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A SKETCH. 147 

recreations which they, in their youthful days, thought 
so ecstatic. 

Of the snug, family, and friendly dinner parties, 
on a small scale, or of the cosy, comfortable tete-a- 
tetes of feeding friends and acquaintances, who often 
meet at Everton, little need be told. On such occa- 
sions comfort, happiness, pleasure, and content are 
generally the attendants and servers-up of excellent 
nutritive dishes, or of tempting tid-bits, that prove 
exquisite flavourers to the juice of the grape, the alco- 
holic cordial, the nectar, brewed with acid and dulce, 
dashed with Farintosh, and the wholesome and invigo- 
rating beverage extracted from British fountains, with 
the aid and instrumentality of Sir John Barleycorn. 

Breakfast parties are rare, and scarcely ever given 
at Everton, except on the mornings of wedding-days; 
but set and formal large dinner parties are as frequent 
as may be desired. 

Dinner parties are, however, the gentlemen's scenes 
of glory ; the fair sex, at such times, are not in their 
element, unless, indeed, it be the bold woman who 
loves to laugh loud, and to hob-nob with all who 
challenge her to quaff the "rosy cup; " it is only the 
least amiable of the sex who can enjoy, with a zest, 
a crowded dinner party's operations. But thanks 
to morality, decorum,, and virtue ! the dames of Ever- 
ton are more given to tea than to toasts; to soiree 
badinages than to banquetings ; and, in fine, to pru- 
dent and rational pleasantly than to pampering their 
appetites with the best gifts of Apicius or Bacchus. 



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148 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

Many ladies of Everton, to gratify their lords, do 
the honours, and go through the arduous duties, of a 
crowded dinner table ; but such efforts are generally 
tributes to conjugal affection and duty, rather than 
effusions of display, or ventures in quest of satisfaction 
or delight. Seeing that in every library, and in every 
bookseller's shop, we meet with ponderous tomes on 
"Cookery made easy/' it need not be stated here 
what viands grace the dinner tables of the Everton 
gentry in general, who feast and feed according to the 
custom of fashionable society, the particulars of which 
Kitchener, Ude, and Co. may, and if consulted, must 
and willy inform the reader. At this epoch, it is the 
custom of the ladies of Everton to retire at an early 
hour from the dining saloon, leaving the gentlemen 
to politics and Port wine. Ah, no ! honest plain Port 
is now almost banished from the tables of the present 
luxurious Englishmen; fanciful French wines have 
now become the bibulous favourites of John Bull, or 
rather of the gentlefolk of John Bull's family; John 
himself, and his unsophisticated branches, are wise 
enough still to love the good, sound, bracing juice of 
Portugal's grape, despite of the shewy sparkles which, 
in French wines, deceive all the senses but that of 
sight. 

The secrets of the seraglio are not better kept than 
are those of the ladies who assemble in the drawing- 
room immediately after dinner ; in due time, however, 
the female divan bring their confabulations to a close; 
coffee is announced to the lords of creation, and then, 



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A SKETCH. 149 

in most cases, the sexes again assemble ; some of the 
gentlemen, it is true, love to linger with their beloved 
bottles, but most of the youngsters, and all sober- 
minded men, quit at the earliest summons to join the 
ladies ; some solely for the ladies' sake, some to avoid 
a debauch, some to escape the host's commands of 
fill! fill! and drink! drink! "drink deeper still!" 
and some to propitiate Cupid and Hymen. In the 
evenings of a dinner-day at Everton, on the reassem- 
bling of the sexes in the drawing-room, the employ- 
ments and occupations of host, hostess, and guests, 
are most diffusely diversified. On the removal of the 
coffee service, music is frequently introduced, to 
which, perhaps, some few lend an attentive ear; but 
the generality are more inclined to loquacity — the 
gentlemen, moved by the powerful potations they 
have taken, the ladies by instinct ; and, it is well 
known, your lovers of loquacity are little solicitous to 
enjoy the " concord of sweet sounds." The charms 
and delights of music, therefore, on the evenings of 
such days, are but too often "wasted on the desert 
air:" but not so the tactics of flirtation ; its ma- 
noeuvres are regularly performed; whilst inflexible 
prudes look on and darken their lovely features 
with cold, constrained, and solemn airs, generally 
masking their real wishes and desires with fictitious 
frowns. 

Cupid is often very busy on such evenings; he 
delights to keep up a brisk fire on the hearts of the 
young, aye, and pours volleys of darts into the bosoms 



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150 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

of the more aged, who have retired from the temple 
of Bacchus to visit the shrine of Venus. 

Affianced lovers will often, on such occasions, steal 
the opportunity to whisper certain tender sentences ; 
half-formed attachments wax stronger, and bashful- 
ness inclines to grow bold; for wine works strange 
metamorphoses in a bashful lover's brain; it is, indeed, 
generally found that the bottle can give courage to 
the faint heart, and eloquence to the timid tongue; 
therefore, let young ladies take good note, and bear 
well in mind, that as "in vino Veritas," so may they 
expect to hear the unadorned and honest truth, from 
the lips of their admirers, on the evening of a dinner- 
day. 

It only now remains to sum up the ways of ending 
a dinner-party's amusements at Everton, by stating, 
that sometimes a merry dance ends a merry day. 

To the list of the in-door amusements and recreative 
employments of the gentry of Everton, must be added 
the game of billiards — billiard-tables being now esta- 
blished in many private houses at Everton. To this 
game may be added those of chess, trou-madam, baga- 
telle, draughts, backgammon, and others. Many a 
fascinating fair one of the township, by adroitly en- 
gaging her husband, brother, or other relative of the 
roving sex, in games at backgammon, cribbage, pic- 
quet, &c, keeps forging fresh links for that chain of 
blandishments with which she binds the strongly- 
inclined-to-be rover to " Home, sweet home." 

These remarks on the manners, customs, &c, of 






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A SKETCH. 



151 



the people of Everton, must now be brought to a 
close, by stating that there are many families in the 
township devoted to serious studies and pursuits ; 
the members of such families frequently meet in a 
neighbourly and friendly manner. At such meetings, 
time is generally employed in rational conversation, 
in mutual intercourse of sentiment, and in pious, 
learned, or moral discussions : the younger members 
find advantage and amusement in putting together 
dissected maps; playing with moral conversation cards; 
providing for the charitable bazaars; constructing 
fanciful toys and useful nick-nacks, wherewith the 
saloons of the wealthy are embellished ; and lastly, 
though not least in importance, in listening to the 
wisdom of their elders, — in which occupations the utile 
and the dulce are nicely blended. These, and many 
other employments of a similar nature, offer high 
advantages and enjoyments, as well as pastime and 
pleasure, pure and satisfactory, to the moral and well 
instructed children of the township. 

If this copious section, noAv brought to a close, 
need further apology or defence, it must be briefly 
made in the poet's words, who states that — u the pro- 
per study of mankind is man." 



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SECTION VII. 



DESCRIPTIVE AND 

GENERAL OBSERVATIONS 

ON THE SUBDIVIDED PROPERTIES OR LOCALITIES OF 
EVERTON; INTERSPERSED WITH BRIEF BIOGRAPHICAL 
SKETCHES, AND REMARKS. 



It is too much the custom of those who draw up 
historical accounts to confine themselves to general 
matter, and prominent events; presuming this, it 
certainly may not be deemed blameable, when authors 
or compilers make stepping stones of minute circum- 
stances, by which their readers may be led, step by 
step as it were, to become clearly and intimately ac- 
quainted with the subject matter in hand ; and it is the 
minute and variegated parts and passages of historical 
contexts which soften their characteristic dryness; 
the view, therefore, that is taken in this section, of 
men and things, will be close, minute, and familiar. 
Next to veracity, in historical essays, is variety; it 
is this which grafts amusement on instruction, and 
applies equally to this humble local treatise, as to 
historical narratives of magnitude. In furtherance of 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 153 

tliis view, the reader is invited to accompany the 
author in his travel over the township of Everton, or 
rather over the map, which is affixed to this work. 

The outline of the map ahove alluded to was con- 
structed about forty years ago, that is, in or about the 
year 1790, and is now presented, with many altera- 
tions and amendments, and in a far more explicit 
shape. This map is not introduced or recommended 
to the reader on account of its possessing any peculiar, 
accuracy beyond other maps ; for, indeed, it is owned 
that, of all the maps of Everton which have yet been 
drawn up, the palm must be yielded to the one pub- 
lished by Mr. Sherwood, in the year 1821. Mr. 
Sherwood's valuable map of the township is a masterly 
work, and, in a great degree, free from fault ; yet the 
omission of the measurements of the enclosures of 
gardens, &c, &c, may be deemed a defect of some 
importance. But it is preferred to introduce the 
ground-work of the map of 1790 into this work, 
principally, because it affords the opportunity, by such 
a line of reference, to shew the manifold and great 
changes which a few years have brought about in the 
property and appearance of the township. 

Having already given, from the most authentic 
records extant, a brief outline of the soil and seign- 
orage of Everton, from the earliest periods to the 
present time, a closer and more comprehensive view 
will now be taken, in which the several and separate 
properties, or localities, of the township will be 
minutely and expansively examined ; a view not 



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154 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

merely and solely descriptive, but which will embrace 
and connect minute description with diffuse observa- 
tion ; a sort 6f analysis, as it were, of both matter and 
mankind in Everton : the reader may, therefore, ex- 
pect to find his walk over the township plenteously 
strewed with remarks, pertinent and appropriate /to 
the subjects discussed. 

In the histories of empires, the most celebrated 
figurantes, and the most prominent national transac- 
tions only, can be placed; but in a local historical 
essay, there is room to exhibit a- great part of the 
community separately and individually; where 
events, however humble, are. seldom deemed devoid 
of interest: it is therefore intended to graft on the 
descriptive context, numerous and brief biographical 
sketches, — connecting the biographical matter, as ap- 
propriately as possible, with the several localities, as 
they pass under consideration. 

When youth are instructed in the art of drawing, 
they are taught, in delineating the human face, to 
divide the visage into sections, by which, correctness 
and intimacy with the subject in hand are amply and 
facilely obtained. Copying, in some measure, this 
simple yet efficacious plan, the township is nominally 
divided into nine distinct and separate districts or 
divisions; those districts or divisions are again 
divided by the regular black lines into proper, appor- 
tional parts or spaces, which distinctly point out 
and delineate the shape and size of each proprietor's 
proportions, and the several and distinct possessions, 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS; 



155 



throughout the entire township; for the sake of 
conciseness those subdivisions are named localities. 
To elucidate the plan further, to each proprietor a 
figure is appropriated; so that when a proprietor 
owns more than one locality, each and all the loca- 
lities of such proprietor will be markedwith a figure 
or figures, uniform and alike, as the case shall de- 
mand; and again, the different localities of each 
individual proprietor may be distinguished by the 
italic letters subjoined to the figures. This mode 
of treating separately and individually, and in many 
cases minutely, the localities of the township, may be, 
perhaps, considered somewhat precise; but the method 
has the advantage of perspicuity, in a high degree, 
and affords, to all persons concerned and interested 
in the affairs and property of Everton, a facility of 
reference, which it is hoped will atone, in a great 
measure, if not altogether, for the formal, business-like 
manner of the plan adopted. 

Everton is a compact parcel of land, and, as the 
map shews, pretty nearly a square : for convenience 
of description, as has been before stated, the township 
is marked out and divided on the map into nine dis- 
tricts ; and as the north is the prime or principal of 
the cardinal points of the compass, to the north dis- 
trict of Everton is conceded the precedence in these 
observations. 



NORTH DISTRICT. 

The north district of Everton is bounded on the 



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156 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

west by St. Domingo-lane ; on the south by Mere- 
lane i on the east by part of Hangfield-lane, and by 
part of Beacon-lane, and Sleeper' s-hill ; and on the 
north by Bronte-lane and Walton Cop. 

In the year 1 790, the whole of this district was the 
property of two individuals : that portion of it marked 
6, a> (being the northernmost extremity of Everton, 
and separated from the other parts of the township by 
Walton-breck-lane, and a short lane at the west end 
.of the great Sleeper,) belonged, at that time, to 
R. Heywood, Esq. This spot is the north-west part 
of the ancient Sleeper' s-hill, a name by which this 
and two adjacent localities on the east of it were . 
known from time immemorial ; and by that name is 
this small region or portion of Everton designated in 
a map constructed about the year 1710. 

It is said that the person who first enclosed or 
reclaimed the lot of land marked 6, a, from the 
common or waste, was a shoemaker ; from which 
circumstance the place acquired the by-name of 
" Cobbler's Close : " but the name was discontinued 
after Thomas Barton, Esq. purchased the locality, 
and gave it that of "Pilgrim," a name which took 
its rise from some transaction or agency in the 
disposal of a valuable prize, captured in the West 
Indies, during the French revolutionary war, by a 
letter of marque of Liverpool, belonging to Joseph 
Birch, Esq., M.P. called the Pilgrim. Mr. Barton 
was a wealthy merchant of Barbadoes and Liverpool, 
of whom it is not necessary to say more, than 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 



157 



that he raised himself by talent and industry, from a 
humble station, to one of great respectability and 
opulence. After, or just before his demise, Pilgrim 
became the property of his brother, the late higlily 
respectable Sir William Barton, Knight, long an 
eminent merchant of Liverpool, who sold the pre- 
mises to James Atherton, Esq. 

The entire locality 6, a, was purchased from Mr. 
Atherton, about fifteen years ago, by the present 
owner and occupier, Samuel Woodhouse, Esq., who 
took down the old dwelling, &c, and erected the 
elegant mansion which embellishes his villa ; he also 
changed the name of the place to that of Bronte ; the 
origin of which name is connected with an estate or 
place in the Mediterranean, from which the title of 
the immortal Nelson, as Duke of Bronte, w T as taken. 

Mr. Woodhouse has been also one of fortune's 
favorites ; he resided for many years with his brothers 
on the shores of the Mediterranean, where they Avere 
engaged in commercial pursuits, on a scale of great 
magnitude, in which they - were very prosperous. 
Samuel Woodhouse, Esq. of Bronte, returned in 
affluent circumstances to his native land, and fixed 
his residence at Everton, where, in the autumn of 
life, he seems to enjoy every advantage that fortune 
has placed at his command. Mr. Woodhouse may be 
considered a scion of an Everton family-stock, for his 
maternal connexions were, and long had been, nobles 
of Everton j — his mother was a Miss Hey es, co-heiress 
to some valuable Everton property. Mr. Woodhouse 



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158 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

has not placed himself prominently in any of the pub- 
lic affairs of Everton ; he has, however, been in office, 
and shewn that, if necessary, he has both talent and 
inclination to render good service to the township. 

With the exception of the Bronte, or as it was 
formerly called, the Pilgrim villa, and the mere, or 
public watering pond, the entire of the north district 
of Everton wtls, in the year 1790, the property of 
John Sparling, Esq., a merchant of Liverpool, of emi- 
nence and long-standing, and was his St. Domingo 
estate, of which many particulars have already been 
given in the section of " Property." But it may be 
relevant to enter more at large into the history of this 
estate, and briefly to treat of its founder, and other 
proprietors. 

George Campbell, Esq. was the founder of the 
St. Domingo estate, who, on the 23d August, 1757, 
made the first of his purchases of those Everton lands 
which originally formed the estate. From time to 
time he made other purchases of contiguous lands, 
which he added to his St. Domingo estate. The 
spot Mr. Campbell chose for his place of residence, 
was at the south end of the patch of land, or locality, 
which is marked in the map 2, i, where a house was 
pleasantly situated; it was separated from the main 
road by a deep, triangular-shaped lawn, the sides of 
which were bordered with trees and shrubs, and the 
front protected by neat stoops and chains. The house 
was not distant more than bow-shot from the old 
Beacon, consequently it commanded extensive and 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 159 

charming sea and land prospects. There were many 
convenient outbuildings attached to the mansion, one 
of which stood in the east, separated from the dwelling 
by Beacon-lane. The building was, in reality, a 
stable, but a stranger would have rather inclined to 
consider it a place in which religious rites were 
performed ; for, to indulge some whim, Mr. Campbell 
had constructed the building (particularly the windows 
of it) to resemble places dedicated to divine worship. 
Whether Mr. Campbell meant any thing or nothing 
by the indulgence of his whim, tradition doth not 
very clearly elucidate ; but there is strong reason to 
surmise that a spice of improper satire, or some- 
thing still more reprehensible, dictated the project. 

Mr. Campbell gave the name of St Domingo to 
this estate, in commemoration of a piece of good 
fortune which befel him, when one of his vessels 
captured a rich ship from the Island of St. Domingo^ 
in the West Indies. Of all the anecdotes, connected 
with Mr. Campbell, which have been collected in the 
research of data for this work, only one will be 
inserted here. 

It is said that in the year 1745, Mr. Campbell 
was placed at the head of an irregular body of men, 
hastily raised in Liverpool, for military service, to 
check the advance of the rebels, under the Pretender : 
Mr. Campbell's company was ordered to march for 
Manchester, but made no further progress than War- 
rington ; but even in that short campaign, one adven- 
ture, worthy of Cervantes' pen, fell to their share. 



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1G0 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

It happened that in the way of Campbell's warriors 
lay a flock of geese; mistaking them, at first, for 
fellow-militants, Campbell's heroes prepared for their 
maiden encounter in the field of Mars; — some say 
that their hearts palpitated, others, that worse things 
happened ; but we will let these rumours pass. On 
a near approach, the enemy was found to be a 
cackling cavalcade, more disposed to flight than fight. 
The reasoning bipeds, marching onwards, soon com- 
mingled with the main body of the feathered tribe of 
instinct, upon which the former became strongly 
disposed to declare war, and to commence slaughter- 
ous operations. 

Now Campbell's men, if they were not the most 
valiant of soldiers, proved themselves deserving of the 
character of diplomatists of the first rate, and most 
admirable machiavelians. A parley was entered into, 
in which Campbell's heroes demanded of the geese, 
whether they were willing to accompany them ori 
their march? — the geese hissed! — a sound so per- 
fectly in unison with, and similar to, the affirmative 
monosyllable, yes, that eveiy man of Campbell's 
company, to spare their new friends the fatigue of 
marching, "bagged his bird." Onward the allies 
went, until, at halting time, the descendants of the 
saviours of Rome found themselves placed at the post 
of danger, as hunger's forlorn hope j in short, they 
were devoted to all the horrors of the pot and spit. 

Thus, under a saving clause which would have 
done honour to the ingenuity of the ancient Mr. 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 161 

Touchstone, did Campbell's warriors acliieve their 
first and only warlike enterprize. Their fears of 
future consequences were stilled by conscience whis- 
pering unto them, that the recording angel would 
register the peccadillo as a venial sin, and place it on 
the list of other such statesmanlike — pardon the slip — 
warlike offences. As to worldly consequences, Camp- 
bell's men well knew that the state of the times wag 
their safeguard. And now, gentle reader, take this 
anecdote in the sense it is meant to be conveyed — 
that is, as a philippic against war in general. 

The proprietors who possessed the St. Domingo 
estate between the days of Mr. Campbell and those of 
Mr. Sparling were non-residents, or only temporarily 
resided at Everton; therefore, if a sketch of their 
biography be required, the annals of Liverpool must 
furnish it. 

The context, then, at once passes on to John Spar- 
ling, Esq., a common-council-man of Liverpool, and 
a merchant of that port, of the highest class in his 
day: prosperous and prudent, he realised a vast 
fortune, and wisely retired, in the wane of life, to his 
beautiful villa at Everton; which, in the year 1793, 
he improved and embellished, by taking down the old 
mansion, and at some few hundred yards north of its 
site, erecting the most splendid edifice in the whole 
township, St. Domingo-house ; but at an expense 
considerably beyond his calculation, the recollection 
of which caused him some sighs of real regret, if not 

M 



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162 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

of sorrow. But Mr. Sparling was desirous to tempt 
his heirs and successors to reside at a spot to which 
he was himself much attached, and took great pains 
in his testamentary clauses to bind his heirs to keep 
possession of the property; and, should they be unwil- 
ling to reside at the place themselves, so highly did he 
hold and regard the name of Sparling, that he directed 
them to give a preference to any tenant of that name, 
who might offer to take the St. Domingo estate. But 
testamentary restrictions, it seems, can be removed ; 
the last desires of testators are not always complied 
with ; as was the case with Mr. Sparling. An act of 
parliament was procured, under the powers of which 
the "St. Domingo estate was sold and alienated alto- 
gether from the Sparling family ; a measure, it is 
true, that did no injury to the surviving heirs, — on the 
contrary, they were considered benefited ; but thereby 
the fondly cherished intentions and desires of the last 
testator were posthumously destroyed. 

Soon after the late Mr. Sparling erected St. Do- 
mingo-house, he constructed a tomb, in Walton 
church-yard, so as to be visible from the windows of 
his mansion ; no doubt calculating that such an object 
would cause generation after generation of his family, 
in their frequent glances towards so impressive a me- 
mento, to recur to the memory of the individual who 
had, in an exemplary manner, procured them so 
Stately, valuable, and delightful a place of residence, 
as was the villa, or estate, of St. Domingo ; — but the 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 



163 



sequel lias added one more proof to the* many on 
record of the evanescent and unstable nature of our 
trust and confidence in all human transactions ! 

There were some other remarkable clauses in the 
late Mr. Sparling's will, but it is not necessary to 
notice them further than to say, that they were the 
emanations of a pure mind, devoted to the religion of 
his progenitors. It is said Mr. Sparling purchased the 
St. Domingo estate with the fruits of a fortunate spe-> 
culation in the funds; but independently of any such 
stock-jobbing transactions, he was a very wealthy man. 
Mr. Sparling contemplated the construction of Queen's 
Dock, in Liverpool, but subsequently disposed of his 
interest therein to the dock-trust ; Sparling-street, 
which is near to Queen's Dock, owes its name to him. 

Mr. Sparling was elected mayor of Liverpool in 
the year 1790. During his mayoralty, he convened 
a common-hall; but none of his successors have 
shown any inclination to follow so noble an example. 

Mr. Sparling was one of the last of the old school 
of Liverpool merchants; when he attended 'Change, 
he was drest with precision and care, generally wear- 
ing a gold-laced waistcoat, and of course, as was the 
mode in his day, a three-cornered, or cocked-hat : he 
was one of those wealthy and upright traders of 
Britain, of the eighteenth century, whose attire and 
conduct were on a par, so far as plainness, precision, 
regularity, and substantial worth will suffer the com- 
parison to be carried. 

Independently of the erection of the mansion-house, 



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164 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

on the St. Domingo estate, the late Mr. Sparling 
much improved its general appearance, by planting 
trees, building good stone fences, and in various other 
ways, until at length the property became every thing 
that a retired gentleman and amateur agriculturist 
could wish. In one point, however, he was defi- 
cient, he neglected the construction of paved roads, 
by which Ins residence would have been commo- 
diously approached; for in his day, the estate was 
surrounded and intersected by sandy, cart-rutted 
lanes; nor are many of the roads in its immediate 
neighbourhood yet paved. 

i " The principal of the St. Domingo estate consisted 
of two large, triangular-shaped patches of land, which 
may, for distinction's sake, be termed the western and 
eastern triangles. St. Domingo-house stands on the 
western triangle, but the lands of this triangle, which 
once formed one and the same property with the man- 
sion, are now divided and subdivided into many parts ; 
in some of which architectural operations are now 
carrying on with such rapidity, that a description of 
their appearance to-day, would not be a picture of the 
plan a month hence. The north boundary of this 
west triangle is marked on the map 2, «, and 2, b; 
where some half a dozen dwellings and outbuildings 
are erected ; on one of which there is marked " North 
View : " but from that north boundary, to the lodge 
of St. Domingo-house in the south, the lands are as 
yet uncovered with buildings, except an old bam, 
which was crowded with spectators, on the 12th 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 165 

August, 1812, when Mr. Sadler's balloon was inflated 
at the Pilgrim (now Bronte) villa. 

The fields and the lawn, north of St. Domingo- 
house, are used as pasture land, from whence crops of 
hay are occasionally taken ; extensive gardens (one 
cultivated by a nursery-man) are in the immediate 
south vicinage of the mansion ; .the nursery ground 
is in the tenancy of Mr. Whalley, an eminent seeds- 
man, &c, whose house is of the oldest standing in 
that line in Liverpool. It may be remarked, en pas- 
sant, that Mr. Whalley takes great pleasure in per- 
mitting visitors, at all reasonable hours, to stroll in his 
highly cultivated grounds. South of Mr. Whalley's 
-grounds are some unbuilt-on lots of land, and, pro- 
ceeding more southerly, a new street (Sparling-street) 
bounds the vacant lands last named : this new road 
is a short thoroughfare, which connects Beacon-lane 
with St. Domingo-lane. There are, at this time, only 
two cottages in Sparling-street, to which pretty places 
the appropriate names of Delta and Rose are given. 
Mr. Atherton is, however, contemplating the erection 
of a handsome range of dwellings .on the north side 
jOf this street. From Sparling-street to the south 
point of the west triangle, the space is occupied, on 
.the east side, by one or two joiner's establishments, 
. and a few cottages j and on the west side, by some 
comfortable, but not extensive dwellings. 

The roads and avenues which border this west 
triangle of the ci-devant St. Domingo estate, were 
some time ago considered delightful and sequestered 



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166 HISTORY OF EVERTON. , 

places; they were adapted to the ruminations of 
philosophers, or to the seclusion coveted by lovers, 
for seldom was this charming retreat intruded upon 
by strangers ; therefore, neither the philosopher nor 
the lover, who perchance stole into these delightful 
avenues, had to fear the observations of ignorance, 
malice, and slander. 

It has been already stated, that W. P. Litt, Esq., 
and afterwards, the late W. Ewaxt, Esq., became 
proprietors of the St. Domingo estate, and that Mr. 
Ewart sold it to the commissioners of the barrack- 
department ; but the purchase was comprised in, and 
confined to, this western triangle, very nearly th6 
whole of which became the property of the barrack- 
department. W. P. Litt, Esq. was an eminent 
merchant of Liverpool, as he is now of London, and 
where he at present resides ; he made St. Domingo- 
house his domicile the greater part of the time he was 
its proprietor ; but the late Mr, Ewart never made it 
his place of abode. 

The barrack-department made little use of their 
Everton purchase; nor was it at all calculated for 
their purposes; a truth, indeed, of which 'they were 
apprised before the purchase was made, by a deputa- 
tion of the inhabitants of Everton, who endeavoured 
to dissuade government from a measure which threat- 
ened to annihilate all Everton' s advantages of rural 
beauty and tranquillity: the deputation, however, 
failed in their object, and the barrack project was 
completed. To the people of Everton, the result 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 167 

proved of but little annoyance, wliilsf to Government 
it was altogether unsatisfactory. 

At length, the barrack-department grew tired of 
their bargain, and offered the whole for sale ; but no 
purchaser offering for the place in gross, the com- 
missioners had the property divided into lots ; some 
of which they sold at public mart. Much of the land 
was long on their hands, and the last parcel was only 
recently disposed of; no part of the purchase has been 
sold to advantage. After the sale, Mr. Pritchard, a 
very respectable wine-merchant of Liverpool, was the 
first to erect a dwelling upon apart which he purchased 
in the north-east corner or angle of the triangle. 
Mr. Pritchard's house is a neat and commodious place 
of residence; for a length of time it was somewhat 
lonely, but other houses are springing up in the 
west, so that shortly it may have a neighbourhood 
populous enough to afford both security and good 
society. The locality on which Mr. Pritchard's house 
is fixed was called " Headless Cross-field;" here, 
therefore, the cross must have once stood. 

At the north-west angle of this west triangle, Mr. 
Lang has recently erected some three or four most 
excellent houses, called North View, from which 
a marine prospect is obtained, that can scarcely be 
excelled. >.. ; i. 

St. Domingo-house, with a strip of land on the 
north for a lawn, was sold by the commissioners for 
barrack affairs, to Messrs. Sandbach and M'Gregor, 
and has been tenanted, for a considerable time, by the 



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168 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

very worthy Misses Come, who have established a 
seminary there of the first class, where respectable 
young females are received en pension, and carefully, 
becomingly, and usefully educated, — with every ele- 
gant requisite as to taste, grace, and ornament. It 
is ventured further to state, (though entirely, and 
only, on the strength of the good report the Misses 
Corrie have obtained by their exemplary conduct) 
that in the care and culture of young ladies com- 
mitted to their charge,, purity of mind, agreeableness 
of manner and person, and the proper direction of 
intellect are attended to most carefully, and in fine, 
that nothing is neglected by them in the education of 
the choicest of all a parent's treasures — the fairest, and 
the loveliest, and the tenderest of creation's works. 
Of Prince William of Gloucester's sojourn at St. 
Domingo-house, notice will be hereafter taken. The 
lands that are marked in Mr. Sherwood's map as 
belonging to the barrack-department, have, since that 
map was published, been disposed of by the com- 
missioners to Messrs. M'Gregor and Sandbach, but 
all of them were afterwards purchased by the late 
Alexander McGregor, in whose family the ownership 
remains. 

The trustees, under the powers granted by the 
act of parliament relative to the alteration of the 
objects of the late Mr. Sparling's will, sold the eastern 
triangle of the St. Domingo estate to J. G. Geller, 
Esq.; and soon after the purchase was effected, Mr. 
Geller erected on it a most extensive and elegant 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 169 

mansion. This handsome, stately edifice stands 
pretty nearly in the centre of the grounds ; its front 
is constructed of a superior kind of red brick, brought 
at great extra cost from Manchester ; but Mr. Geller 
was not sparing of expense in the development of his 
taste, of which this villa is a noble specimen, and is 
Sufficiently and becomingly planted with young wood, 
which is fast spreading, and will shortly shelter and 
embower the mansion and out-offices : a long moat 
runs in nearly an east and west line, intersecting and 
irrigating the lower grounds ; and over this -miniature 
canal, or elongated lake, are thrown light, fanciful, 
and useful bridges. In fine, taken in the whole, the 
place may be classed the very highest of all Everton's 
villas ; and (if the extent of ground be properly taken 
into consideration) it may be deemed the most 
picturesque and desirable place of residence of any 
within the circuit of half-a-score miles. To this, : 
or very nearly to this, state of perfection, did Mr: 
Geller bring that which, when he purchased the 
estate, was only a few acres of meadow land. 

Mr. Geller is, and long has been, a highly respect- 
able merchant of Liverpool, very extensively engaged 
in the commercial affairs of that port ; assiduity and 
punctuality seem to have been his guides through the 
labyrinths of commerce ; he is one of those merchant- 
men, by whose employment, and through whose 
means, Liverpool and other lands reap great advan- 
tages. Such men fill the hives of trading towns with 
abundance of rich wax and honey. 



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170 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

After residing at this beautiful villa, named Mere 
Bank, for some time, Mr. Geller disposed of it to 
William Myers, Esq., who has made it his place of 
residence for a length of time, 

Of Mr. Myers, as a public man, the annals of 
Liverpool will treat ; from a tinge of reserve in his 
manner, the biographer cannot collect much data 
to descant upon ; but as a member of the community 
at large, enough is seen and known of him at Everton, 
to sanction the statement of his being a moral and 
highly respectable gentleman. Mr. Myers seldom 
interferes with the public affairs of Everton. 

The localities that now form Mere Bank are 
marked on the map 2, q, 2, r, and 2, s ; they are all 
enclosed as in a ring-fence, containing in the whole 
about four acres; and, in all likelihood, it will be long, 
very long, ere the builder covers this land with 
any other architectural erections than such out-houses 
as may be requisite for the family occupying the villa, 
and occasional additions or enlargements to the. man- 
sion itself. 

Of the north district of Everton there remains now 
only to notice the mere, or public watering place for 
cattle. The mere and its banks occupy the south-east 
comer, or angle, of the north district of Everton ; it is 
a large sheet of water, and is, together with its banks, 
nearly an acre in extent : in most places it is shallow, 
and in no part very deep. As the seasons are more 
or less wet, this piece of water expands or contracts 
its dimensions, and sometimes very considerably. 






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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 171 

Were it ever desirable, some land might be reclaimed, 
at a small expense, from this watery expanse ; indeed, 
there, is already a good piece of terra firma embanked 
and effectually reclaimed in the north-east, where a 
snug cottage and pinfold are constructed. The cottage 
is public property, and is tenanted by a worthy mason, 
who is the overlooker or superintendent of the pinfold; 
it yields a rental of £9 9s. per annum to the town- 
ship, out of which certain demands are annually paid, 
amounting to £6 8s. 8d., — viz. Lord's rent £5 15s., 
Breck-silver 13s. 4d., and 4d. for the acquittance. 
This arrangement consolidates and simplifies the set- 
tlement of certain demands annually due to the lord 
of the manor, which, as is shown by deeds in the 
town's chest, the township is bound to liquidate; and 
as the lands become more and more subdivided, the 
apportionment of each lot's liability becomes also more 
minute, intricate, and complex, even to the extent of 
causing perplexity in the adjustment. The scheme, 
therefore, of thus raising the sum required for the 
lord's rent, and even more, in this simple shape of a 
single rental, is as commodious as it is satisfactory ; 
and if, in carrying the plan into effect, any slight inac- 
curacy arose, the good produced Avill far more than 
balance any such trifle.* Another excellent matter 
has been spoken of — which is, to build a workhouse 
near, or even adjoining the cottage at the mere, for 
the use and accommodation of the paupers of the 
township. Such a step would eventually prove an 

* See a minute made in the town's book in the year 1759. 



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172 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

economical measure ; for many paupers who receive 
out-door relief, would forego their demands on the 
township, when they were offered the alternatives of — 
no relief, or to become in-door paupers. At all events, 
the measure is worthy of cool, deliberate, and early, 
consideration, 

NORTH-EAST DISTRICT. 

The north-east district of Everton is bounded on 
the north by Walton-cop; on the west by part of 
Hangfield-lane, Sleeper-hill, and part of Beacon- 
lane ; on the east by the lands of Walton ; and on 
the south by the Long Hangfield, marked on the 
map, 3, e. 

Until a few months ago, the north-east district was 
perfectly pastoral ; very lately there was not a single 
erection on it to serye man for a domicile, or the 
beasts of the field for shelter ; it was then altogether 
a patch of pasture land ; but a few months ago two 
wealthy persons of Everton, Hugh James Sanderson, 
3,nd George Johnson, Esqrs., have made extensive 
and adjoining purchases, at the west end of which 
they are now constructing three commodious man- 
sions. Of these gentlemen more notice will be taken 
in the section of the west district of Everton, where 
they reside. 

The localities of the north-east district are separated, 
as indeed are those of the whole township, with neat, 
well-kept fences, hedge-rows, walls, and ditches, ac- 
cording to the several portions of the properties of 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 173. 

various individuals. In the year 1790, this district 
was owned by five proprietors ; but of the principal 
part of its past and present owners it is not necessary 
just now to treat \ for, with the exception of three of 
them, they will have other places allotted to them in 
these annals. One of these exceptions is the late 
Mr. Birchall, who some say was a publican, others 
a dairyman ; it may be that he followed both 
occupations. The Everton freeholds which formerly 
were his, have now fallen into other hands. Another 
of the exceptions above alluded to is the late Bamber 
Gascoyne, Esq. 

It will be found, in the early pages of this treatise, 
that the late Bamber Gascoyne, Esq. was, for a con- 
siderable period, and until a few years ago, the lord 
of the manor and township of Everton; in con- 
sequence of the marriage of his daughter and only 
surviving child, those manorial rights became vested 
in the family of the Marquis of Salisbury \ and the 
lands in the township of Everton, which were the 
property of the late B. Gascoyne, Esq., have also gone 
into the same possession. These lands, which are 
marked on the map 3, a, 6, c, d, e, f y and g 9 are in 
reality freeholds, or lands of inheritance; but the 
present proprietor has also power to dispose of them 
as copyholds, he being lord of the manor ; therefore, 
they might be almost termed optional tenure. 

•The other lands in the township, similarly held by 
the late B. Gascoyne, Esq., as is stated in the map 



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174 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

of 1790^ have been sold to Charles Horsfall, John 
Mather, and William Earle, Esqrs. 

It would be superfluous to enlarge on what has 
been already stated of the Gascoyne family ; for its 
high, respectable, and honourable estate and bearing 
in society, hare been so long, and are still so well 
known, that they need neither notice nor panegyric 
in these humble pages ; besides, it is in the history 
of - Childwall, that the biography of the Gascoynes 
must, at some epoch, conspicuously appear. It may, 
however, be added, that deeply rooted in reason is 
the hope which assures us that the exalted connexions 
of the Gascoyne family will, by acts of justice, 
courtesy of conduct, and amenity of manner, continue 
to conduct their manorial privileges, and to hold inter- 
course with their feudal tenants, so as to continue 
entitled to receive that which, though possessed by 
the Gascoynes, cannot be bequeathed, demised, or 
entailed— the voluntary praise, esteem, and respect 
of the inhabitants of the manor of Everton. 

The third and last of the exceptions before noticed, 
is Christopher Bullin, Esq., banker, of Liverpool, 
who owns several localities in this district. It would 
require much space in these pages to speak of 
Mr. Bullin as his desert warrants and demands ; few 
are the lines that can be devoted to each biographical 
sketch — but in one line truth can say much ; and as 
it regards Mr. Bullin, truth says he is of a suave and 
cheerful disposition, agreeable and gentlemanly, and 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 175 

in Iris conduct, both public and private, courteous and 
highly honourable. 

. Except at the north extremity, this district is a 
flat plain, affording little of that variety which is so 
pleasing to the lover of the picturesque ; but from all 
parts of it a good inland view is obtained. There is 
little wood in the entire district, except the hedge- 
rows. But if the principal part of the north-east 
district affords little that is interesting to the ad- - 
mirer of landscapes, the reverse may be said of the 
north extremity, which is a beautiful patch of land ; 
the place is named the Great Sleeper, and is a part 
or parcel of the lands once known by the name of 
Sleeper-hill, which was and is still the north-east 
boundary of Everton. 

The Great Sleeper, or, as it has been sometimes 
called, the Four Acre, is a fine piece of ground ; its 
southern extremity is its highest part, where it is 
bordered, or bounded, by "Walton Breck-lane ; from 
that lane, extending northward, the land of the Great 
Sleeper forms a level plain for a considerable distance, 
and from that plain, in different directions, two gentle 
slopes decline towards the lands of Walton; these 
slopes present two fronts, the one to the north, and 
the other to the west, thus offering an uninterrupted 
view of the mouth of the Mersey, of the Irish sea, and 
of the extensive plains which, commencing at the 
sea-side, run for many miles into the interior — plains 
that are daily becoming more interesting, for wealthy 
persons are constantly building extensive, elegant, 



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176 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

and beautiful villas upon them ; and many other very 
respectable persons, but whose banks, perhaps, are 
not quite so heavily furnished, are also erecting snug, 
convenient, and handsome domiciles, to which they 
diurnally retire for the night, when the business of 
the day at Liverpool is over ; or as places of general 
abode, when success commensurate with their calcula- 
tions or wishes has crowned their commercial efforts. 
Near to the cop of the Great Sleeper, in the road 
called Walton-cop, there was constructed a beacon 
of faggots, which only stood for some months, when; 
about the year 1803 or 1804, some incendiary, during 
the night, set it on fire, and the pile was consumed ; 
— no further evil ensued. 

The Little Sleeper, or Sour-longs, presents a most 
extensive front to Walton Breck-lane ; a circumstance 
which will materially enhance its value when it shall 
be required for building purposes, the situation being 
delightful, promising to suit all who may wish to 
possess agreeable rural villas. 

EAST DISTRICT. 

The east district of Everton is a compact patch of 
land, and the only district which is not intersected 
with roads or lanes. This district is bounded on the 
west by Hangfield-lane ; on the south by Breck-lane; 
on the east by the lands of Walton Breck ; and on 
the north by the Marquis of Salisbury's, and the late 
Rev. J. Tatlock's Hangfields, marked 3, d, and 12, i. 

The bulk of this district is also pastoral, and with 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 



177 



its immediate neighbours on the north and south sides, 
may be admired, and almost coveted, for the rural 
advantages they possess ; this and the adjoining dis- 
tricts not only enjoy the advantage of being purely 
rural, but, from their proximity to a large town, they 
also possess the convenience of having all their house- 
hold and domestic wants facilely and economically 
supplied. 

On the verdure of these districts cattle are amply 
depastured ; the soil affords to the husbandman a fair, 
if not a generous return; and the few erections 
already completed admirably serve the denizens of 
Liverpool, and other individuals, for pleasant domi- 
ciles, where, in peace and pure air, under the favour 
of Providence, they may add many years to the leases 
of their lives. Of many of those persons who were 
proprietors of lands, in the east district of Everton, in 
the year 1790, it is not intended, in this section, to 
treat, as they will have conspicuous niches allotted to 
them in subsequent parts of this historical treatise, — 
a few of them, however, en passant, must be men- 
tioned. 

The localities marked 29, a, and 29, b, were, in the 
year 1790, owned by the late Jonas Bold, Esq., a 
gentleman of high rank in the aristocratical circles of 
Liverpool, and who was an alderman of that borough. 
Mr. Bold was but very slightly connected with Everton; 
he married into the Oldham family, whose house, near 
the old beacon, was destroyed by fire, in the year 
1782; since that period none of the family have 

N 



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178 HISTORY OF EVERTON* 

dwelt in the township. It does not appear that the 
late Mr. Bold was ever conspicuous in the affairs of 
Everton. * 

Mr. Green, who in the year 1 790 owned the loca- 
lity marked 45, a, was an eccentric gentleman, and 
somewhat given to ascetic habits; he built the 
original part of the dwelling (now much enlarged and 
improved) which forms the charming residence of the 
family of the late William Harding, Esq. Previously 
to its becoming Mr. Harding's property, it was owned 
by George Case, Esq., alderman of Liverpool, who 
for some years made it his country residence. During 
Mr. Case's possession of this villa, in the night of the 
2d of October, 1803, a destructive fire took place, 
which materially damaged the mansion. It is more 
than probable that Mr. Case always deemed the 
public affairs of Everton too insignificant for him to 
engage in ; but in the mercantile, and more particu- 
larly in the municipal, affairs of Liverpool, he has 
long borne a prominent part. 

In the rear of this mansion, which has been greatly 
improved since Mr. Green's time, the late George 
Goring, Esq. erected a summer hut or small cottage, 
which was unpleasant to his neighbour on the south. 
This cottage had its origin in a misunderstanding 
between Mr. Case and Mr. Goring, and gave rise to 
a suit-at-law ; the result of the law-suit (as is ever 
the case) was loss, particularly to Mr. Goring. 

There are many curious clauses respecting cottages 
in an old law, 31 Elizabeth, chap, vii., little known 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 179 

and less cared for at the present day : the following 
is extracted therefrom. 

" No man may build a cottage, unless he lay four 
acres of land thereto; except it be in the market 
towns, or cities, or within a mile of the sea, or for the 
habitation of labourers in mines, sailors, foresters, 
shepherds, &c. ; and cottages erected by order of jus- 
tices of the peace for the poor and impotent people, are 
excepted out of the statute : the four acres of land to 
make it a cottage within the law are to be freehold 
and land of inheritance ; and four acres held by copy, 
or for life or lives, or for any number of years, will 
not he sufficient to make a lawful cottage."* 
., .If this, law be not abrogated, or if there be not some 
hole to creep out of it is a question if the cottage (the 
subject of these remarks) was an erection agreeable 
to the laws of the realm; but this is now. immaterial, 
as regards the instance under consideration, for the 
cottage which Mr. Goring built has been taken down. 

Being now on the subject of cottages, it may be as 
well to state that there have been recently many cot- 
tages, or small houses, built at Everton. Now if the 
trade, commerce, and manufactures of Everton re- 
quired such a description of papulation as must occupy 
buildings of this humble sort, the evils, which of a 
certainty often emanate from the presence of such 
domiciles, might be patiently endured; but when it 
is considered that the labouring tenants of such dwell- 
ings, are, and will continue more and more to be, — 

* The penalty is £10, and 40s. a month for the continuance. 



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180 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

a very vast majority of them at least, — artizans and 
operative aggrandizers of Liverpool, surely it is not 
too much to endeavour to place the burthen of pauper- 
ism on the right shoulders ; on the shoulders, in short, 
of that body which grows fat on Hie labour of the 
prospective paupers of Everton. Under this view of 
the case, the authorities of Everton would not only be 
justified in examining into, and having enforced, all 
the restrictive clauses, touching cottages, that may be 
found unrepealed in the Statute Book, but it is their 
duty so to do.* 

The south-west quarter of the east district of Ever- 
ton has, of late years, been much advantaged, by the 
formations of new villas, and by planting, and other- 
wise improving the soil; two excellent, handsome, 
and spacious houses have been recently erected there, 
and the roads have been much improved ; the south- 
end of Hangfield-lane has been paved, and were it 
properly taken in hand, this road_ might be made 
excellently useful and ornamental. From Breck-lane 
to the mere, what a number of elegant villas, charm- 
ing and salubrious residences, might be constructed 
in that rural lane ! where a life almost, if not wholly 
pastoral, might be led, and even at so short a distance 
from the second town of Britain — twenty minutes' 
walk would take a merchant from the Rialto to these 
regions of Arcadia. 

The late William Harding, Esq. made considerable 
additions to the villa originally founded by the late 

* Sec a minute in the town's book, made on the 20th June, 1754, 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 181 

Mr. Green, by purchasing the adjoining localities, 
16, e, and 17, y, which enabled Mr. Harding highly 
to improve the appearance of his lawn and pleasure- 
grounds, and to form the whole into a most delightful 
place of residence.* 

There is a neat, handsome, though small, lodge- 
like cottage at the north part of the late Mr. Harding's 
mansion, the appearance of which must be pleasing 
to every spectator ; it is a spot where a quiet bachelor, 
or an elderly lady, might calmly glide through life, 
in all the luxuries of retirement. 

Two excellent houses have been lately erected, by 
the late Mr. Harding, on localities 16, e, and 17, g ; 
these buildings are stuccoed over on the outside, to 
resemble stone-work. At the northernmost of these 
mansions resides James Cordes, Esq., a gentleman 
extensively engaged in mercantile pursuits at Liver- 
pool; and at the southernmost and largest of these 
domiciles resides Adam Hodgson, Esq., whose 
"Letters from America" have given him well- 
deserved celebrity. 

The two last-noticed villas would wear a more 
rural, and a truly picturesque appearance, were the 
grounds attached to them more adorned with that 
necessary feature in all rural landscapes — wood; 
were the places clustered somewhat abundantly with 
shrubs, and moderately sheltered and embellished 
with trees, as is the villa of the late Mr. Harding, 

* Mr. Case, in the first instance, by the purchase of locality 20, g, 
rendered this desirable and valuable villa capable of great improvement. 



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182 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

they would vie in beauty with any in the neighbour- 
hood. 

The late Mr. Harding was, in early life, a master 
mariner, and became afterwards a considerable 
merchant of Liverpool; eventually, he realized a 
handsome fortune, and with prudence, highly praise- 
worthy, retired from the risques and cares of com- 
merce, to enjoy with his family all the comfort and 
happiness which fortune had placed at his command.' 

During the residence of the late Mr. Harding at 
Everton, there were few public concerns, of any 
interest or consequence, in which he was not engaged, 
and, as is the case generally, had he lived longer, 
the disposition to be a public man, would have grown 
with increase of years ; as it is, there is no remark- 
able feature to record in his public operations, save, 
indeed, that he was laudably instrumental in pro- 
moting the building of the first church erected at 
Everton. 

With the exception of the four domiciles already 
mentioned, there are no architectural erections in the 
east district of Everton. In its south-east quarter, 
there are three very desirable fields, belonging to 
John Pyke, Esq., marked 17, h, 17, % and 17, h; 
these fields, as a whole, form a valuable and beautiful 
plot of land ; from the eastern parts of them an almost 
unrivalled inland view is obtained, for the gentle 
declivity of the adjoining eastern lands permits the 
eye to have a free and extensive range from the 
north, round by the east, and far towards the south. 






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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 183 

At the nortli-east corner of this east district is a small 
singularly-placed locality, which extends across the 
east ends of three long* fields, whose west ends abut on 
the mere's east bank. This little spot would not have 
received this individual notice, if it did not afford 
the opportunity of clearing up a slight inaccuracy in 
Mr. Sherwood's map. It is there stated that this 
locality, 15, /, belongs to Miss Rowe ; but that lady 
permits it to be said that the property belongs to the 
estates of Messrs. Rowe and Beezley. This is a very 
slight inaccuracy indeed \ and it is highly creditable 
to Mr. Sherwood's talent and assiduity, that errors of 
greater magnitude have not been discovered in his 
map, and but few, very few, others of any kind. 
This map has, however, one drawback, it does not 
give the fidl measures of each lot of land ; gardens, 
sites of houses, and enclosed spaces having been 
excluded. 

It may be said of this region of Everton that the 
lands are, in the main, superior in point of fertility to 
most other soil in the township. 

The following statement may be considered a little 
out of place, but the opportunity to make it must 
plead the excuse. A little way on the east of 
Mr. Pyke's field, 17, A;, on the south side of Breck- 
road, there stands a long-known, and somewhat noted, 
public-house, named "Cabbage-hall." This public- 
house, although small, and not over commodious, or 
imposing in appearance, is much resorted to by the 
lower and middle orders of its own neighbourhood, 



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184 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

and by pedestrians of the same classes of Liverpool, 
in their rural excursions on Sundays, holidays, and 
other casual times of visitation. The place is scarcely 
sufficiently significant, either in its line of business, 
or in its offers of accommodation to travellers, to 
receive this particular notice, had it not been to 
remark, that the name of the place serves as a guide- 
word to persons in search of the residences of the 
gentry who dwell in the vicinage of the universally 
known " Cabbage-hall," — that a place is so Jar 
distant, or lies in such a direction, from Cabbage-hall, 
is a guidance as serviceable, and generally as true, 
as are the inscriptions on a sign-post. 

SOUTH-EAST DISTRICT. 

The south-east district is bounded on the north 
by Breck-lane ; on the west by Breck lands ; on the 
east, by Rocky-lane ; and on the south, by Roundhill- 
lane : the fields marlced A, are bounded on the south, 
by Rake-lane; on the west, by Boundary-lane ; * 
on the east, by Rocky-lane; and on the north, by 
Roundhill-lane. In reality, this south-east district is 
of very small dimensions, for the seven fields marked 
A are not in the township, nor under the control 
•of the authorities of Everton ; neither should be the 
narrow slips of land on the west side of Boundary- 
lane; they form, indeed, part of 115 acres, which 

* There are narrow slips or strips of land subject to West Derby that 
ought to be marked A ; they are the east ends of fields that lie on the 
west side of Boundary-lane : and those narrow slips form the cast 
border bf the south district of Everton. 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 



185 



are leased for 1000 years to the copyholders of 
Everton, of which lease notice has been already taken 
in this work, under the section of " Property/' The 
people of West Derby have proved that these seven 
fields, and other adjoining small portions of the said 
lease-lands, were parts and parcels of the commons 
or wastes of West Derby, and accordingly the copy- 
holders of West Derby claimed, and eventually sub- 
stantiated their claim to, these particular lands ; but, 
as will be seen by documents given in the Appendix, 
the tenants of Everton were suffered to remain in 
possession, and also to enjoy all the advantages of the 
premises in question, on condition of paying £20 per 
acre in money down, and of contributing tithe and 
tax in common with other and similar lands of that 
township, to West Derby, for and during the term of 
the said lease. Everton, however, still pays the whole 
amount of lorcfs rent (£5 15s.) as stipulated in the 
afore-named lease ; and as 5^ acres was given up in 
land to West Derby, over and above that which 
was paid for at £20 per acre, as before stated, the 
township of West Derby annually pays to the town- 
ship of Everton the sum of 5s., (it ought to be 
5s. l^d.,) which is the proportion of lord's rent due 
yearly from the owners or occupiers of the said 5^ 
acres of ceded land. 

In the year 1 790, this diminutive south-east dis- 
trict of Everton was entirely and purely pastoral, and 
is so, even yet, with the exception of the changes 
that have taken place on one single locality— a long 



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186 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

narrow slip of land, marked on the map 21, e. That 
part is now dissevered, or divided into many lots, or 
separate properties, on the greater part of which 
handsome dwellings are erected, each residence 
having delightful and serviceable gardens on their 
south sides. The westernmost of these houses is the 
property and residence of Mr. Richard Powell, a 
gentleman engaged in the cork-cutting business at 
Liverpool, and whose charming little villa receives 
the admiration of all who behold it ; nor is it deficient 
in any of the comforts and embellishments of domestic 
economy, which characterise every country establish- 
ment of a wealthy and well-to-do John Bull. Mr. 
Powell's little villa has a tasty, rural air about it, 
which is really pleasing. What a contrast does this 
place and the mansion of the Harding's form, when 
compared with the ancient part of the Odd-house, which 
stands nearly opposite ! and yet some fourscore years 
ago, that diminutive part of the Odd-house was the 
residence of a substantial and very respectable family. 
But great revolutions have taken place in the do- 
mestic economy of the inhabitants of Everton of late 
years ; the Odd-house itself, with its considerable 
architectural additions, and pretty garden-grounds, 
now forms a residence which might be coveted by a 
modern family of wealth and respectability. Next 
on the east of Mr. Powell's villa, are three good 
domiciles, the property of Mr. Thomas Reeves, at 
one of which he resides. Mr. Reeves has retired 
from business, which, no doubt, he profitably followed 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 187 

in Liverpool : both lie and Mr. Powell occasionally 
step forward to aid and promote the interests and 
public concerns of the township ; they have both, too, 
when called upon, most satisfactorily filled the office of 
surveyor of the roads; and in all respects seem desirous 
to countenance and assist every effort made for the 
good government and frequently meditated improve- 
ments of Everton, where they have now long resided. 

On the east of Mr. Reeves' property is a cottage, 
or summer-house, and garden, belonging to the 
family of the late Mr. R. Richardson, who was a very 
worthy, plain, and unobtrusive gentleman, and an 
ornament and credit to the line of business he was 
engaged in. Mr. Richardson was an eminent linen- 
draper of Liverpool, who might have boasted that 
integrity and civility formed the greater part of his 
entire stock of commodities — and no doubt he found 
that they were commodities which put as much money 
into his purse as any other articles in which he dealt. 
The garden was the late Mr. Richardson's delight— 
his hobby indeed ; it was there, in summer and fine 
weather, he would frequently retire, to cheat care 
and sweeten life, by enjoying the luxuries of Flora 
and Pomona, and which, at most seasons of the 
year, presented themselves when he visited his loved 
rural retreat. 

There are also three other dwellings, and three 
other gardens, on the east of the garden last named. 
They are pretty little hobby-horsical spots for the 
Liverpool cits to spend their leisure time at in summe^ 



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188 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

when many an agreeable and merry tea-drinking 
party meets. These gardens are bounded on the east 
by two dwellings, with grounds attached; at the 
largest, and which is his property, resides William 
Pickering, Esq., Mecklenburgh Consul, and a higlily 
respectable corn-factor of Liverpool. Mr. Pickering 
is extensively connected with foreign commerce, and 
is one of those truly useful persons who, when the 
laws will permit, imports corn into our ports — that 
absolutely necessary and veritable staff of life ; he is 
also one of those who, if legislators did not interfere, 
would, under the permission of Providence, never 
suffer famine to pay even a transient visit to our (in 
most respects) highly favoured land. Excepting on 
locality 21, e, no other part of the south-east district 
of Everton has been yet submitted to the builder's 
operations. 

The locality marked 14, «, is, in the map of 1 790, 
stated to be the property of the Rev. Mr. Formby, but 
that statement, though not altogether without founda- 
tion, is not strictly correct: Mr. Formby certainly 
contracted with the late John Rowe, Esq. for the pur- 
chase of the field, but the consideration (some pro r 
perty in Manchester) was not accepted by Mr. Rowe, 
and who, in the sequel, gave Mr. Formby an equiva- 
lent for relinquishing the contract. The place is now 
the property of the worthy Miss Rowe, of Everton 
Crescent. Of the other proprietors of this district 
notice will be taken in subsequent and more appro- 
priate pails of these pages. 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 189 

Of the situation, soil, local advantages, &c. of this 
south-east district, it may not be necessary to say 
more, than that the prospects from this quarter are 
somewhat more confiued and curtailed, both in extent 
and beauty, than those in its northern neighbour- 
hood ; for the- land of the adjoining townships on the 
south, are almost, if not fully, equal in height with the 
lands of the south-east district; but an exception must 
be taken, as far as regards the north-east quarter, 
from whence most extensive, charming, and beautiful 
inland views may be obtained. As to the soil, salu- 
brity of situation, and other matters, this district is 
pretty much on a par with other inland parts of the 
township. On the east border of tins district, in 
Walton township, William Brown, Esq. of Liverpool, 
and Adam Cliffe, Esq. of Everton, are each construct- 
ing a delightful villa, and the mansions now erecting 
there by those gentlemen are spacious, commodious, 
and might indeed be almost termed magnificent. 

SOUTH DISTRICT. 

The south district of Everton is a large and com- 
pact patch of land, forming nearly a square in shape; 
it is bounded on the west by Everton village, and' 
Everton-lane ; * on the north by Breck-lane ; on the 
east by Breck-lands, and by strips of land on the 
west side of Boundary-lane; and on the south, by 
lands of Low-hill, and by Rake-lane. 

A great part of this district is still also pastoral ; 



t> 



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190 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

but on its west front there are, and time out of mind 
have been, many dwellings, to which are attached 
convenient outbuildings, useful gardens, and orna- 
mental pleasure-grounds. The north pail of the 
west front of this district may be said to constitute 
the eastern edge or limit of the village of Everton, 
or, as it is styled in most of the very ancient draughts 
and maps, the "town" of Everton. 

This part of the work is considered the most ap- 
propriate for giving those brief biographical sketches 
of persons which were omitted in the accounts of the 
districts already noticed, — although the subjects of 
them were proprietors of lands and localities which 
have been descriptively travelled over in the previous 
parts of this treatise. 

Commencing, therefore, at the extreme north-west 
corner of the south district, at a very small locality, 
marked 17, </, which in the year 1790 was, and is 
still, the property of the oldest family, whose de- 
scendants of the same name continue to reside in the 
township — named Pyke ; but of the members of the 
Pyke family, more notice will be taken immediately. 

In the year 1790, on locality 17, rf, there stood a 
ruinous dwelling, and an equally dilapidated barn, in 
which human beings at that time, and subsequently 
also, took up their abode ; but it is due to the credit 
of the present proprietor to state, that no sooner 
did he get possession of the ruinous old places from 
the last of their occupants than he razed them to the 
ground, and, in the year 1805, caused the present 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 191 

handsome dwelling to be erected on their sites ; but 
the entire lot is so limited in extent that the house 
occupies nearly the whole of its surface. 

Adjoining the last noticed lot is locality 70, a, 
which, in the year 1790, was the property of the late 
Mrs. Bennett, whose delicate state of health long 
confined her in a state of comparative seclusion to 
the interior of her snug, comfortable domicile. At 
Mrs. Bennett's death, the property passed into the 
possession of the late Edward Chaffers, Esq., once a 
highly respectable merchant of Liverpool; who, in 
his latter days, lived at this place as a retired gen- 
tleman, well known and remembered for his cheer- 
ful, sociable qualities, and agreeable conversational 
powers. 

Until very recently, there stood on the west front 
of this lot a good, strong, stone-built edifice — a larger 
kind of cottage; but some three or four years ago 
the Misses Chaffers, who are its present proprietors, 
took the old building down, and had a very tasty 
piece of architecture placed on its site, where they 
now reside. This building is perfectly unique in 
Everton, as to its style or order of architecture, and 
on the whole displays a taste superior to the common 
usages of modern art : it is strongly built, and, were 
it not rather conventual in appearance, might be 
termed a beautiful, as it is undoubtedly* an elegant 
and commodious domicile. But, as usual, the sombre 
hue of the Everton red-stone materially detracts from 
that lightness of style which buildings of this class 



\ 



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192 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

may, and indeed ought, otherwise to possess. The 
Misses Chaffers seem, in an eminent degree, to be 
endowed with those rare, but rich treasures of life, 
content, happiness, and independence; whilst they 
rank, in mental attainments, and respectability of 
station and character, with the first classes of Ever- 
ton's refined community. 

In many of the old maps there is some indistinct- 
ness in marking out the true divisions of these two 
last named localities, but in the map attached to this 
work the boundaries of each lot are clearly and pro- 
perly defined. 

Adjoining the property of the Misses Chaffers, on 
the south, is the locality 17, m, which has long been 
possessed by the family of "Pyke" — the most ancient 
in Everton, and one which, by the intermarriage of 
its present head with a lady of the family of Heyes, 
has created for itself extensive interest, and will have 
great influence in the future concerns of the town- 
ship. The locality, 17, m, was long the residence of 
the ancestors of the present John Pyke, Esq. In the 
year 1784 his father died there, and his widowed 
mother afterwards long resided at this old-fashioned 
villa, with her very worthy daughter, Miss Ann Pyke. 
In this dwelling these two excellently-disposed ladies 
remained until the year 1825, in the plain, praise- 
worthy, moral, and neighbourly style of good old 
days. 

On the death of his mother, in the year 1825, the 
present Mr. Pyke, at considerable expense, converted 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 193 

an antique, better sort of large farm-house, into a 
genteel and commodious place of residence, in every 
way suitable for a family of respectability. The old 
dwelling was flanked on the north by a large barn, 
which Mr. Pyke took down. 

The Pyke family promises to perpetuate its name 
in the township to a remote period ; the main branch 
or head of it has for some time past established its 
residence at Everton, and to all appearance per- 
manently; the family being numerous, and owning 
extensive possessions, it is probable that they will be 
induced, in many instances, even when settled in 
separate conjugal communities, to take up their abode 
where their name has been so long known, and where 
the increasing value of their property will afford them 
proportionate weight and consequence. 

In early life, the present John Pyke, Esq. was a 
master-cooper of Liverpool; but it is long since he 
retired, and no doubt with adequate pecuniary reward, 
from the toils, cares, and risques of business, to enjoy, 
in the autumn of life, that modicum of peace and 
happiness which Providence shall please to place 
before him ; and where is he more likely to find peace 
and happiness than in the quiet and semi-rural social 
enjoyments of Everton village ? 

In the year 1790, the locality 19, k, was owned by 
the heirs of the late Mr. Thomas Heyes, whose widow 
was the last person of the name that held possession 
of the place ; the house is still standing, on the west 
front of that locality, in which the late Mrs. Thomas 

o 



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194 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

Heyes died. She was a kind-hearted woman, but, 
like her neighbour, Mrs. Bennett, was much confined 
to an in-door life, by infirmities and want of health. 
The family of Heyes is, perhaps, the most ancient 
Everton family whose immediate descendants are 
known to be still inhabitants of the township; and 
from the extensive possessions, which old deeds, 
maps, and various other documents shew them, from 
time immemorial, to have possessed in the place, 
they must have long ranked high in weight and 
consequence at Everton. 

The nobles of Everton have previously been alluded 
to in these pages, in which class many of the Heyes' 
family formed a part ; from them the Messrs. Pyke, 
Woodhouse, Row, Beezley, Okill, and Manifold have 
derived considerable parts and parcels of property, 
all which families, and likewise those of Plumpton 
and Jenkins, are, by actual affinity of blood, or by 
matrimonial alliances, connected with some or other 
of the branches of this family. The name of Heyes 
has, however, become extinct in the township, except 
in the Christian appellative of some of the juvenile 
descendants. 

Most people of the present day must well remember 
the late Mr. John Banks, of Liverpool, who was a 
respectable-looking old gentleman. About the year 
1782, Mr. Banks had a spinster sister, who then 
resided as a companion to the last Mr. Heyes, at the 
villa now under consideration. Miss Molly Banks 
was a courageous woman, and often took delight in 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 



195 



exercising, herself with the use of fire arms. Her 
intrepidity and presence of mind once preserved her 
friend's house from robbery. Having been awakened 
by some strange noises in the dead of a winters night, 
Miss Banks stole from her bed, and seizing a loaded 
fowling-piece, proceeded to an upper window, from 
whence, by the glimmer of a few twinkling stars, she 
discovered some men striving to effect an entrance 
into the house, through a window immediately under- 
neath the one at which she stood; upon which she 
cautiously unfastened the lattice, and gently obtruded 
the fowling-piece, sufficiently to bear on the mark, and 
fired most effectively, for, although the robbers scam- 
pered off, one of them was seriously wounded, and 
crawled to the end of the village, where, it is supposed, 
his comrades put him into some vehicle, and con- 
veyed him away, no further trace of blood being dis- 
covered. Miss Banks was proud of her achievement, 
and the community was protected from night depre- 
dators, for robberies were unknown in the township 
for a considerable time afterwards. 

The house in which the late Mrs. Heyes resided, 
and indeed the whole of the locality 19, #, has under- 
gone many alterations and amendments, and is now 
the residence of John Pyke, Esq., whose lady is great 
niece to the last male of the family of the Heyes' * 
who resided at Everton. 

The next locality on the south, adjoining to Mr. 
Pyke's, is that which is marked on the map 38, b. 

* The late Mr. Thomas Heyes. 



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19G HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

This villa, in the year 1790, was the property and 
residence of the late John Rowe, Esq., the father of 
the much lamented and worthy George Rowe, Esq., 
who died on the fifth day of July, 1826, aged fifty- 
seven years, and during the time he was serving the 
office of bailiff of the borough of Liverpool j an office 
which, had he lived; there is little doubt would have 
been a prelude to his possessing the mayoralty of that 
place. George Rowe, Esq. was twice married ; by 
the first wife he had a son, who died in 1829 ; by the 
second wife he has a daughter, who is now heiress to 
the family estates of the Rowes of Everton. 

Some seventy years ago, the family of Rowe first 
settled itself in Everton ; the head of this family (the 
late John Rowe, Esq.) came from Cheshire, and pre- 
viously to his taking up his abode at Everton, had 
been a most juespectable merchant of Liverpool. The 
late John Rowe, Esq., the elder (for he had a son 
whose name was also John), for a long series of years 
performed a conspicuous part in Everton' s municipal 
matters, and internal local arrangements. Mr. Rowe 
became an inhabitant of Everton at a time when 
its nobles were not overburthened with discernment, 
when their wit was homely, and their manners but 
very slightly polished ; the lords of Everton were then 
unscholastic, plain-dealing, honest people, to whom 
Mr. Rowe became a treasure, for in the direction 
of the affairs of the township he was factotum ; nor 
can his good sendees be denied with any shew of 
truth, for his measures appeared to be those of pru- 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 197 

dence and patriotism : that he was ever attentively at 
his post, is clearly ascertained, by his name appear- 
ing affixed to almost every public document of con- 
sequence, from the year 1764 to that of 1805. But 
towards the latter end of the last century many new 
comers, of equal mental capacity, influence, and 
consequence with Mr. Rowe, settled themselves in 
Everton, and this circumstance, together with his 
advanced state of life, led him, a few years before his 
decease, to withdraw altogether from public affairs. 

For a long period the old nobles, with Mr. Rowe 
at their head, opposed the innovations of the new 
settlers, whose attempts at more enlightened, and con- 
sequently more expensive, modes of proceeding, were 
ill brooked by the legitimates of Everton. Many 
bickerings and wordy skirmishes were the conse- 
quence ; but at length Mr. Rowe, and a great majo- 
rity of the old regime, gave in to the better planned 
measures, and acted in friendship and concert with 
their new neighbours. 

By his intermarriage with a daughter of the late 
Mr. George Heyes, the late elder John Rowe, Esq., 
became greatly interested in the proprietorship of the 
lands of Everton: both the map of 1790, and Mr. 
Sherwood's recently constructed map, shew that many 
extensive and valuable parcels of land in the township 
were, and still are, the property of the families of 
Messrs. Rowe and Beezley. The late Mr. Beezley 
also married a daughter of the late Mr. George Heyes j 



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198 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

and the sisters, Mrs. Rowe and Mrs. Beezley, were 
co-heiresses of their father's Everton estates. 
. -The late elder John Rowe, Esq., who died on the 
27th November, 1811, left one son and two daughters; 
his eldest son John, a bachelor, died in the life-time 
of his father, on the 31st May, 1809, aged fifty-three 
years; the late worthy George Rowe, Esq., the 
youngest son, and who survived his father, has been 
already noticed in these pages ; and of the daughters, 
one is also deceased. The remaining branches of the 
late Mr. Rowe's family are, a grandson,* a grand- 
daughter, and a daughter, the present very worthy 
Miss Sarah Rowe, a cheerful, intelligent, excellent 
lady, who now dwells at the Crescent of Everton, 
from whose retentive stores of memoiy many passages 
in tliis treatise are drawn. The younger John Rowe, 
Esq. never placed himself very conspicuously in 
society. For a short time after the elder Mr. Rowe's 
death, the family continued to reside at the locality 
now under consideration (38, ft), but at length quitted 
and sold it. The new proprietor converted it into a 
brewery, which proved an unprofitable speculation. 
Since then, the premises have been in many hands, 
and are now the property of James Plumpton^ Esq., 
a gentleman who is a branch of a family long con- 
nected with, and greatly interested in, the landed 

* This grandson is also dead — he departed this life 20th April, 1829, 
at Bath, aged twenty-two years ; by his early and lamented decease 
his half-sister becomes heiress to many valuable Everton properties. 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 



199 



property of the township, and of whom notice will be 
taken more largely hereafter. Mr. Plumpton is 
erecting an extensive mansion in the rear of the old 
dwelling, which is to be taken down when the new 
house shall be completed,- — the work of demolition, 
indeed, hats already commenced. 

The next locality on the south of Mr. Plumpton's 
residence, is that marked 12, y, which was, long 
previous to the year 1 790, the property of a very old 
Everton family, of the name of Johnson, and is still 
in the possession of Mr. Tatlock, the great grandson 
of the last Mr. Johnson, who was seized of the 
property in question. The Tatlock family has very 
valuable and extensive possessions in the township, 
most of which accrue from the marriage of the late 
Rev. Henry Tatlock with the daughter of a rich 
Everton noble, the Mr. John Johnson above-named, 
who built the dwelling-house now standing on this 
locality, 12, g. 

Mr. Johnson is said to have been an honest, 
straight-forward Englishman; endowed with more 
sense than shew ; and to have been a merry, sociable 
neighbour — a happy, cheerful, home-beloved family- 
man. Mr. Johnson was at one time in treaty with 
the late Joseph Rose, Esq., for the disposal of a piece 
of land which now belongs to John Carson, Esq., in 
Netherfield-road north ; it was a certain croft, in 
which a favourite mare of Mr. Johnson's wife was 
buried; Mr. Rose affected to be careless about the 
purchase, and suffered the affair to lie dormant for a 



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200 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

time ; at length, he seriously applied to complete the 
affair, but Mr. Johnson then rose in his demand full 
fifty pounds, urging, in a somewhat satirical strain, 
that he must have fifty pounds more than he had 
formerly demanded, " because that croft was poor old 
Smiler's burial place." The bargain was eventually 
agreed upon, and, with many a chuckle of delight, 
Mr. Johnson has been heard to boast, that he had 
sold a dead horse for fifty pounds ; a sum, as he was 
wont to observe with a sly wink, greater by far than 
any dead horse was ever sold for before. 

The late Rev. Johnson Tatlock was grandson to 
the late Mr. John Johnson, and inherited most of his 
grandfather s Everton possessions. Mr. Tatlock has 
left a widow, and an only son, who, together with 
a very worthy, cheerful maiden lady, sister to the; 
reverend gentleman, are now the only survivors of a 
family which at one time promised to be as numerous 
as it was influential in the township. The Tatlock 
family quitted this residence many years ago, which 
has been in the occupancy of many tenants since that 
period, and is now the residence of Mr. Wm. Syers, 
one of a family which has, in some or other of its 
branches and connexions, been resident in the town- 
ship for the last fifty years — the individuals of this 
name (all of one and the same family) at the present 
moment compose in the aggregate a greater number 
than that of any other name in the township. 

The next locality on the south of the last named is 
that marked 26, e, which, in the year 1790, was the 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 201 

property . of the late John Strong, Esq., long an 
eminent merchant of Liverpool. At the same period 
Mr. Strong was also the proprietor of several other 
parcels of land in Everton, which lie contiguous to this 
locality, and which property was, after Mr. Strong's 
death, purchased by Thomas Hodgson, Esq., who 
bequeathed them to his son E. L. Hodgson, Esq., 
and his children, to whom the property now belongs * 
the lands are all marked with the figures 26. E. L< 
Hodgson, Esq. for some time resided at the villa now 
owned by the Rev. Jonathan Brooks. Mr. Hodgson 
frequently stood forward in many weighty public 
matters; but the scenes of his strenuous and well- 
meant endeavours lay chiefly in Liverpool, of which 
place he was long a merchant of eminence. 

The locality under consideration is little other than 
a very long passage (private property) leading in an 
eastwardly direction to the other possessions of the 
same proprietor. On the north side of this passage 
is the village smithy, generally a noted place, but 
here fixed in a situation too private to be ever 
on a par with Shakspeares smithy. At the present 
smithy of the village of Everton, there are none that 
stand " with open mouth, swallowing the news," for 
nothing is spoken of there but the lightest and .most 
insignificant of village matters ; — once, however, there 
was a smithy at' Everton ! — but of that more anon. 
There is a small ivy-covered cottage, built of the 
Everton red free-stone, which covers nearly one half 



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202 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

of the frontage of this locality ; it seems a diminutive 
and incommodious residence. 

On the south boundary of the last-named locality 
stands another narrow lot, marked 22, ^ on the map, 
which, in the year 1790, belonged to the family of 
the late John Williamson, Esq., once a wealthy and 
highly respectable brewer of Lancelot-hey, in Liver- 
pool, who possessed much other valuable property in 
Everton, all of which has passed into other hands. 
There were few characters connected with Everton 
that stood higher than Mr. Williamson's ; his conduct 
was truly good, and his pale-beer was so honestly 
brewed, and so excellent of its kind, that it acquired 
a highly celebrated name, both at home, and at all 
foreign parts to which it was sent. 

A circumstance happened to Mr. Williamson, with 
such singularly happy results, as to deserve notice. 
He had been long afflicted with a grievous disorder 
in one of his legs, for the cure of which he called in 
the best medical practitioners, who in vain exerted 
themselves in various curative efforts — the disorder 
defied their art — amputation was at length decided 
upon, the profession and the patient having agreed to 
the operation j but, on the morning of the day on 
which it was to have been performed, one — Ashton, 
a cowkeeper of Kirkdale, and who was also a 
veterinary empiric, chanced to call on Mr. William- 
son, and, after a little chat, the undiplomaed doctor 
requested permission to explore the morbid sinuosities 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 



203 



of the diseased member. After due investigation; 
the honest old milk manufacturer proposed, for the 
reward of half-a-barrel of ale, to undertake the cure 
of the condemned leg; and, by way of making the 
offer more tempting and acceptable, the spurious 
practitioner engaged to go through his operations, up 
to the very last stage of cure, without the aid or 
introduction of knife or saw. The proposal was 
accepted, the regular disciples of Galen were dis- 
missed, and the leg was cured, but the half-barrel of 

ale was never paid — no, but in lieu thereof, the 

purse of Mr. Williamson was so much at the cow- 
keeper's service, that his stock in trade gradually 
became greater, and was so advantageously managed, 
that, in a few years, a handsome competence was 
created for the lucky, though illegitimate, meddler in 
the art of leechood. 

Through his intermarriage with the daughter of 
the late Mr. Williamson, General Gascoyne, the 
present worthy member of parliament for Liverpool, 
became interested in some valuable lands of Everton. 

By an inscription, chiseled on a stone over the 
west door, or main entrance, of a cottage which 
stands on this locality, 22, f, it would appear that the 
building was erected in the year 1644; but notice of 
this place has been already taken in the section of 
antiquities ; it is now the property of a Mr. Slingsby, 
a respectable, and, as rumour has it, wealthy grazier. 
If the improvement in this place be the effect of 
Mr. Slingsby's own taste, he has evinced knowledge 



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204 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

in the art of embellishing dilapidated domiciles, for 
this humble villa is only deficient in a few flowers 
and shrubs to give it a rural and agreeable finish; 
There are fastidious persons, who are pleased to say- 
that the inscription over the portal of this cottage is a 
forgery y or an interpolated, spurious piece of intel- 
ligence, placed there in comparatively modern times; 
by the would-be owner of a place of antiquity. 

Proceeding southward, the next locality is that 
marked 1, o, on the map, which, in the year 1790, 
was the property and place of residence of the late 
John Shaw, Esq., a gentleman who, at that time, 
was the most extensive proprietor of Everton lands. 
, The principal part, if not the whole, of the Everton 
possessions of the late John Shaw, Esq., became his 
through intermarriage with a widow lady of the name 
of Halsall. 

There is abundant evidence that the name of 
Halsall long ranked the highest in the list of the 
names of Everton's aristocracy ; and yet there is not 
now one individual of the name dwelling in the town- 
ship ; but it is a name that will long remain con- 
spicuous on its annals — in many a transfer-deed for 
ages to come it must of necessity appear. The 
archives of Everton contain many vouchers of the 
Halsalls of old having played prominent parts in 
most of its transactions ; and for centuries last past 
there appears to have been individuals of that family 
resident in the township, and lords of its soil. 

There are still some members of the Halsall family 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 205 

in existence, and who bear the name ; but it does not 
come within the aim and object of this work to enter 
into an enquiry respecting their professions, pros- 
pects, or intentions, or why they are not lords of some 
parts of Everton's soil at the present time. There 
are also some of the first families of Liverpool related 
to, and connected with, the family of the Halsalls of 
Everton ; amongst others, those of Goore and Stani- 
forth. The last Mr. Halsall, of Everton, was long 
styled an Everton noble — he died rather suddenly, 
and it was his pleasure to bequeath his estates to his 
widow, who, as before stated, again intermarried with 
the late John Shaw, Esq., and to him she bequeathed 
the Everton estates. 

The mansion which stands on locality 1, o, was 
originally built by one of the Halsall family ; it has 
been increased in size, decorated, and embellished, 
at various times, by successive owners and occupiers ; 
the late Mr. Shaw long dwelt there, as did his family 
for some time after his decease. The villa is now in 
the occupancy of William Nicholson, Esq., an alder- 
man of the borough of Liverpool, a highly respected 
gentleman, and fully deserving of the good name he 
universally bears : but it is in higher annals — those 
pf Liverpool — that Mr. Nicholson's biography should 
be placed, and where, in all likelihood, it will 
appear.* 

By casting a glance at the map, it will be per- 

* Since this was written, Thomas Shaw, Esq., the owner of this villa, 
has made it his place of residence. 



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206 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

ceived, that the late Mr. Shaw's Everton posses- 
sions were, in the year 1790, most extensive — each 
and every locality inscribed on the map with the 
figure 1, belonged to that gentleman, and the entire, 
or very nearly so, of those possessions descended to 
his only son and heir, the present Thomas Shaw, 
Esq., a member of the common council of Liverpool. 

The present Mr. Shaw interferes but little with the 
public affairs of Everton ; Liverpool, it is presumed, 
offers a more tempting field for the employment of the 
time he wishes to devote to public business. There 
was nothing prominent in the life of the late Mr. 
Shaw ; he was unambitious and unostentatious, and, 
according to the posthumous character given unto 
him by his neighbours, meritoriously fulfilled his 
conjugal and parental duties. 

There are some ancient buildings in this locality, 
which appear to have been erected for, and used in, 
agricultural pursuits, by the Halsalls of old, when they 
farmed their own lands; and a few paces more 
southward stands an ancient dwelling, at which a 
worthy widow, of the name of Rutter, resides, one of 
those useful, deserving people who, through the 
medium of what are called " country lodgings," offer 
and bestow many comforts, kindnesses, and con- 
veniences to those who have not the power, or in- 
clination, to domicile themselves in the family circles 
of their own relatives, or other near and dear con- 
nexions ; it is said, that persons necessitated, or at all 
disposed, to seek for such things, may find cleanli- 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 207 

ness, comfort, pure air, and equally as pure kindness 
and attention at this humble, semi-rural cottage. On 
the south border of locality 1, o, there is evidence of 
a stream of water having formerly ran to the west- 
ward, across Everton-lane, and so on through a 
gully, which still remains on the south parts of 
localities 25, d, and 1, b. The road is soughed 
underneath, but • the accumulation of water in the 
eastern parts hereabout is now insignificant — for- 
merly it was excessive, as the names of the adjoining 
localities denote, many of them being designated as 
connected with a river — such as the names of " River 
Hey," "River Slack," &c. 

There is nothing sufficiently remarkable connected 
with the next locality, 22, g, to call for particular 
notice ; indeed it may be as well to state here, that 
localities of land only, unless under some peculiar 
circumstances, will be passed over in a cursory 
manner, and, in many cases, without any notice 
whatever. 

If, however, a plan that is in contemplation, and 
which is actually sketched or draughted in outline on 
paper, should be ever carried into effect, a noble and 
spacious street, and an elegant square, will be laid 
out on the lands marked on the map 26, a, b, c, and 
dj this plan, if carried forward, will comprise 180 
most desirable building lots. 

Proceeding southward (having passed across the 
west end of Mill-lane) by the map, the observer's eye 
will fall on ihe localities 42, a, 42, b, 42, c, and 



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208 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

42, d; on the latter of which stands a good house 
and out-buildings, erected by the late Doctor Gleave, 
whose family, in the year 1790, were the proprietors 
of all the localities now immediately under considera- 
tion; and in which family, the most part of these 
properties still remains vested. 

There was formerly an ancient dwelling that 
stood on the site of the present house, and part of 
the ancient edifice still remains on the south of, and 
adjoining to the present house, — the old part has the 
appearance of a diminutive cottage, or dub-down. 
The tenant of this villa is William Russel, Esq., a 
highly respectable merchant of Liverpool. Previous 
to the licensing of the present coffee-house on Ever- 
ton-brow, the old house, which w T as taken down by 
Dr. Gleave, had long been a coffee-house, or, ac- 
cording to the idiom of its day, a public-house, famed 
far and near for the superior and savoury manner in 
which beef-steaks were cooked, and served up to the 
guests, and of course was much frequented by the 
bon vivants of former days ; and even after the house 
lost its licence, its celebrity was retained, for the 
cook, or some successor of ker's, made and sold a 
rich kind of cake, which was much esteemed . and 
greatly sought for by constant customers, Sunday 
saunterers, and holiday idlers. When this place was 
a public-house, it was generally and extensively 
known by the name of the Half-way-house, and is 
the place alluded to, in several minutes entered on 
the town's-books, under the name of " Boyd's." 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 209 

Adjoining the last named locality, on the south, is 
that marked 10, a, which, in the year 1790, be-' 
longed to Thomas Hodgson, Esq. The house as it 
then stood had been erected by a Mrs.- Bridge, the 
mother of the late James Bridge, Esq., who was a 
merchant of eminence in Liverpool. 

Since Mr. Hodgson's time, the villa has been* 
owned and resided at by the late and present town-' 
clerks of Liverpool, the Messrs. Statham, father* and 
son, and to those gentlemen the place is indebted 
for the improved state to which it is now brought y 
indeed, they much increased the dimension of the* 
mansion, and in a great measure converted the villa 
into what it now is — a pleasant and commodious' 
place of genteel residence. 

The villa is now the property and residence of the' 
Rev. Jonathan Brooks, a magistrate, to whom the 
inhabitants of Everton are frequently considerably 
indebted, for the able and efficient manner in' which: 
he performs his magisterial duties in their concerns :' 
and it may be added, that to the able, independent, 
and impartial manner in which that reverend gentle- 
man exercises the judicial power with which he is very 
frequently invested, the public at large are also liighly 
indebted- his measures appear to be promptly and 
appropriately adapted to protect the property and lives 
of the community. The Rev. Mr. Brooks has recently 
become rector of Liverpool ; as a preacher he stands 

* Richard Statham, Esq., the late town- clerk of Liverpool, who died 
27th March, 1820, aged 75 years. 

P 



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210 HISTORY OF EVERTON, 

almost unrivalled, in that town, greatly as it abounds 
with able and eloquent ministers of the gospel. 
. There is much that is highly interesting in the 
next locality, which is marked 18, b, on the map, 
and is on the south and east of the one last noticed. 
In the year 1790, the late James Plumpton, Esq. 
was the owner of this locality, it being then a piece 
of pasture land, containing 2a. Or. 22p. About five 
years ago, it was purchased by subscription, and was 
surrounded with handsome, strong, arid high walls, 
and. dedicated to the uses of a burial ground, under 
the appellation of " The Low-hill Cemetery;" but 
subsequently its name has been changed to that of 
" Necropolis." 

The Necropolis is, in reality, altogether within the 
township of Everton, at a few yards distant from West 
Derby or Low-hill, there being only Rake-lane between 
the townships ; and as this repository of the dead is 
most conveniently accessible from Liverpool by the two 
main roads which lead from that populous town to Low- 
hill, it is probably judicious, though not strictly correct, 
to give it the name of " The Low-hill Necropolis." 

The design and uses of this undertaking are highly 
deserving of eulogy, and it is admirably adapted, in 
point of situation, to answer every purpose of its pro- 
jectors ; it lies at a properly remote distance from the 
crowded scenes of vitality ; its high walls protect the 
bodies of the dead from profane disturbance; its 
appearance wears a quiet and solemn, yet (if the 
word may be used) cheerful air; in fine, it is just 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 211 

such a spot as the good children of mortality woiild 
select wherein to have their last bed made. The 
establishment is, indeed, not less a credit to its pro- 
jectors and proprietors, than it is a convenience of 
the first magnitude to its populous neighbourhood. 

There are many excellent regulations under which 
the Necropolis is conducted, the particulars of which 
will be given in the Appendix ; but there is one of 
great value, in a liberal and enlightened point of 
view, which must be mentioned here, and that is, 
the permission of having funeral obsequies performed 
by pastors of any religious persuasion, at the choice 
and will of the friends of the deceased. This privi- 
lege forms a strong inducement to many individuals 
of the community to have their remains laid amongst 
those of others, with whom in life, though of different 
sects, they commingled in amity and good fellowship. 
Why should we be over mindful who is our next 
neighbour in the grave ? let not, then, even the 
shadow of a thought arise to instigate us to over- 
nicety, in the choice of a last earthly home; or if 
such a thought will intrude, let reason and christian 
charity overrule it. Before taking leave of this sub- 
ject, it may not be irrelevant to notice concisely the 
architectural embellishments and conveniences of this 
cemetery. 

The whole of the principal, or south frontage of 
the Necropolis, is of plain, handsome white stone; 
in the centre of that front, are iron gates, separated 
by and suspended from two strong and handsome 



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212 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

pillars, which prop and support the pediment-wall 
that crosses and crowns "the entrance. That part of 
the cemetery which fronts Everton-lane is fenced in 
by a wall of similar stone, 13 feet high; the other 
parts of tliis extensive burial-ground are surrounded 
by brick walls of similar height. The entrance, or 
iron gates, at the south front, are flanked with two 
handsome buildings, in the Grecian style of archi- 
tecture ; that on the west is the registrar's or resident 
minister's house, and that on the east is dedicated to 
the performance of devotional and sepulchral rites and 
ceremonies. In the last named edifice is a large apart- 
ment, or chapelry, where funeral processions are admit- 
ted immediately on their arrival at the cemetery. 

To fix a stationary registrar, or resident minister 
of religion, on the spot, is in perfect keeping with the 
general design and purposes of this institution ; and 
serves, in a high degree, to give to the establishment 
a requisite air of sanctity. The Rev. John Brace is 
the present resident minister, who appears at all 
times courteously inclined to furnish any desired 
information relative to the ceremonies and regula- 
tions of the place. 

What now remains to be noticed of the south dis- 
trict of Everton will require but a limited space. 
From the cemetery, the boundary line of Everton 
crosses Rake-lane, and passing along the south side 
of locality 18, f, again joins, and continues to run 
eastwardly along that lane, on which extensive line 
there were, until lately, only two cottages, which 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 213 

stand on locality 31, c; but a new street has been 
recently laid out, and about twenty houses are now 
building, on locality 18, c; and locality 18, f, also 
seems destined to be soon covered with houses. On 
arriving at the south end of Boundary-lane, the 
boundary line runs due north, and on that entire line 
there is only one dwelling, which stands at the north 
end of Boundary-lane, and is called Whitefield-house, 
which was erected about twenty years ago by the late 
Mr. Bailey, a master tailor, of Liverpool. There is, 
however, a garden in Boundary-lane, in which stands, 
very deeply recessed, a small cottage, where people 
resort to drink tea, and, in the season, to feast on 
strawberries and cream. This place is the property 
of E. Gibbon, Esq., a most respectable gentleman of 
Liverpool. Whitefield-house is a pleasant rural resi- 
dence, but solitary and lonely in winter; Thomas 
Reddish, Esq., an extensive wholesale grocer of 
Liverpool, is its present proprietor. 

On the north side of the south district there are 
only two domiciles, one of which stands at the north- 
east corner of locality 20, d> and is the property and 
residence of Edmund Mawdsley, Esq., the grandson 
of an old. Everton noble, the late Mr. Edward Rice, 
and a lineal descendant of a long line of Everton 
ancestors. Mr. Mawdsley was a. currier, but has 
retired from business, to enjoy, as joint-heir, the 
landed possessions of his forefathers. Of the Rice 
family more will be stated hereafter. 

The other dwelling, on the north side of the south 



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214 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

district, is that one of Mr. Pyke's which was described 
at the commencement of this section. 

There are a few humble dwellings in the interior 
of the south district, at the east end of Mill-lane, 
fixed, by a strange singularity of taste, in a lonely, 
and, as the common saying is, " an out-of-the-way 
place." There are also some houses erecting at the 
south-west part of Mill-lane, some of which, to all 
appearance, will be of very moderate size, and 
would, were it not that they will be skreened by 
a larger dwelling on their west, much deteriorate 
the respectable, and even elegant plan, on which 
Mr. Plumpton has commenced at the west side of 
Everton-lane. 

Thomas Molyneux, of Newsham, Esq., a magis- 
trate of the county, and an alderman of the borough 
of Liverpool, owns locality 32, «, and Mr. Thomas 
Widdowson, of Knotty Ash, a descendant of an 
ancient Everton family, owns localities 31, a, 31, b, 
and 31, c. 

The localities 28, a, and 28, b, are still the pro- 
perty of a family of ancient standing, named Livesley, 
and which, in former days, long dwelt on the borders 
of Everton, on the south side of Rake-lane. 

The locality 18, c, is the property of Thomas 
Banner, Esq., a highly respectable accountant of 
Liverpool. It is here that the builder is now so 
busy, running up clusters of houses with almost 
magical haste, which savour more of town, than 
of rural operations. 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 215 

SOUTH-WEST DISTRICT. 

The south-west district of Everton is bounded on 
the north, by Everton-brow and Everton- village ; on 
the east, by Everton-lane ; on the south, by a strip 
of land in "West Derby, and by lands of the parish 
of Liverpool ; and on the west, also by lands of the 
parish of Liverpool. 

At the present epoch, the south-west district of 
Everton is beginning materially to change its out- 
ward appearance ; the architect's pioneers being 
busily employed in clearing and levelling the surface 
of the ground, and in laying out streets and alleys \ 
the builders' sappers are also constantly employed in 
sinking drains and forming cellular excavations, for 
the foundations and under-ground conveniences of 
dwellings, of various dimensions, for honest John and 
Lady Bull. It is in this district that Thomas Shaw, 
Esq. has recently made sale of very considerable and 
extensive parcels of land, to the amount (as rumour 
has it) in one bargain alone of £30,000: the pur- 
chasers, of course, purpose to have the green fields 
covered with dwellings and conveniences requisite 
Tor the comforts, enjoyments, and employments of 
mankind. 

," Mr. Shaw himself has been recently at very con- 
siderable expense in the formation of a long-ex- 
tended, wide, commodious road or street, which 
effects a desirable communication, or line of passage, 
from Everton-brow to Upper Islington. It is about 



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216 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

three years since Mr. Shaw seriously began the 
formation of this road — it has been a work of much 
labour, and, in all likelihood, of much cost ; the solid 
rock in the hilly part has been quarried and lowered 
several feet, the hollows have been filled up and 
raised, until the street's surface has been brought 
nearly to a level. 

There are already several houses built in Shaw- 
street, chiefly in the north-west quarter, although it 
is only a few months since the first brick of the 
first of those houses was laid ;* they are of various 
dimensions, some being very capacious, and almost 
magnificent structures ; nor are there any yet erected 
in this street but such as would befit a genteel and 
respectable family. 

The lands of which Mr. Shaw has recently made 
so extensive a sale, lie on the west side of Shaw- 
street, and will soon become a human-hive, plentifully 
stocked with swarms of bipeds, who, for want of 
accommodation and space, must emigrate from the 
over-crowded hive of Liverpool. 

The east or upper side of Shaw-street still retains 
a sort of semi-rural character ; along its whole line 
excellent houses, with gardens in their rear, will 
doubtless, ere long, be constructed, and afford most 
delightful abodes to the busy denizens of Liverpool, 
who, at a very trifling exertion, might daily walk 
jroin the Rialto to their meals, and nightly to their 
quiet beds. 

* Autumn of 1829. 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 217 

Commencing the survey of the south-west district, 
where Everton borders or touches on Low-hill, and 
directly opposite to the cemetery on the west, the' 
first object of notice is a villa, on which stands a 
splendid mansion, built in the first instance by a 
family named Fabious; afterwards enlarged by the 
family named Johnson already noticed ; but very 
considerably improved and embellished by the late 
William Gregson, Esq., grandfather to the present 
proprietor, who, together with this villa, owns certain 
Other contiguous lands, all bearing the figure 5, on 
the map. 

. The exterior of the mansion here alluded to does 
not present to the observer any traits of magnificence,- 
but its interior economy and arrangements are, or at 
all events were, splendid, if not superb. During the 
time it was the residence of the late John Gregson, 
Esq., its interior was splendidly furnished, in a style 
of elegance seldom exhibited beyond the precincts of 
the metropolis. At this mansion, a prince of the 
blood-royal (the 'Duke of Gloucester — then Prince 
William) was frequently entertained in the most 
sumptuous manner. Some fifty or sixty years ago, 
the public road was swerved or diverted from its 
straight line, to give this villa a better appearance, 
and to remove the noise and bustle of a public road 
farther from its front ; which measure reversed the old 
adage, or motto, of "pro bono publico." A time may 
arrive, however, when the grounds of this villa will 
be converted into building plots, and then, perhaps, 



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218 HISTORY of everton; 

the authorities of Everton will be enabled to arrange, 
to the satisfaction of all parties, for the return of the 
road to the direction it originally took. 
. Some twenty years ago, the Gregson family ceased 
to make this villa their place of residence \ since when 
it has been in the occupation of many aristocratic 
families, and is now in that of Adam Lodge, Esq., a 
most respectable and eminent merchant of Liverpool. 
At a few paces distant, on the south, from the south 
entrance gates of the Gregson villa, there is a public 
well, fenced off from the parapet of the highway by a 
good iron palisade ; the water from this well is pro- 
cured by direct access to the liquid itself, through the 
medium of a few stone steps ; it is free to the public, 
and seldom dry. The Gregsons of this family have 
been long conspicuous in the affairs of Liverpool ; it 
is, therefore, in the annals of that place where their 
biography must be sought. In the affairs of Everton, 
none of them seem to have interfered, excepting the 
late William Gregson, Esq. 

The boundary land, or border of Everton, as it 
leads to the west from the south part of the Gregson 
villa, buries itself behind a narrow slip which fronts 
to Brunswick-road, in Low-hill, and is the property 
of the Rev. Mr. Formby, of Formby. Of this south 
border of the south-west district of Everton little need 
be stated, there being* not a building on its whole 
line : neither was there a single architectural erection 
on the west border of the same district in the year 

* 1829. 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 219 

1790 ; and even to this day, only one dwelling is to 
be found on that entire length of line ; indeed, with 
the exception of Carver-street, and an opening now 
formed at the south end of Shaw-street, the south and 
the west boundary lines of this district are hemmed in 
by the lands of Liverpool. 

The last-named dwelling stands on locality 49, a, 
and, in the year 1 790, was the property of William 
Roscoe, Esq., of Liverpool, a gentlemen whose merits 
are so universally known, and whose fame is so firmly 
established, that nothing can be stated in these pages 
to enhance the one or extend the other. 
. In search of data to frame this treatise, the follow- 
ing anecdote has been furnished: it is given as 
received ; and on him who supplied it must rest the 
onus to prove its claim to veracity. " William Roscoe, 
Esq. and the late William Neilson, Esq. were, when 
youths, inmates at the establishment, warehouse, or 
shop of the late Mr. John Sibbald, stationer and book- 
seller, of Old Castle-street, Liverpool. During their 
sojourn at Mr. Sibbald's, it was the custom of the late 
Mr. Aspinwall, a solicitor of Liverpool, to visit the 
worthy stationer s shop. Mr. Aspinwall being in 
want of an apprentice, fixed his inclination on Mr. 
Sibbald's young friends, and urgently requested that 
one of them should exchange the study of the belles 
lettres for that of the law. Mr. Sibbald seemed in- 
clined to keep young Roscoe in the magazine of the 
muses, but the solicitor was more strongly inclined to 
draw the youth from the flowery paths of literature 



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220 * HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

into the sinuous, crooked, labyrinthal avenues of law, 
and eventually succeeded." This anecdote may appear 
simple and pointless, but it naturally gives rise to the 
following reflection and question. How oft is Provi- 
dence apt to indulge in what, to us short-sighted mor- 
tals, seems to be strange whims! — had not young 
Roscoe been removed from Mr. Sibbald's garden of 
poesy and prose, what flowers of literature might he 
not have raised ? for at the most critical period of his 
life, they removed him from the truly delightful, fasci- 
nating, and fertile fields of Mount Helicon, to toil and 
delve in the law's dry, hard, and arid plains ; but iii 
•which, it is. true, many skilful and penetrative men 
reap golden harvests. 

• Mr. Roscoe himself dwelt at this villa for a time, 
but subsequent to the year 1790 he disposed of it, 
and most probably to the late Mr. Ewart, who resided 
for a few years at the once elegant mansion that is 
built on this lot. It was, both in Mr. Roscoe' s and 
Mr. Ewart' s time, a delightful place of residence, 
although seated on the verge of a populous town ; but 
very recently the face of the adjacent ground has 
been much altered — the builder is busy in its very 
precincts, the villa itself is become a wilderness, and 
the mansion may be almost termed an excrescence, 
for its size, and still intrinsic value and handsome 
appearance, are altogether out of keeping with the 
present state of its vicinity. This villa is the property 
of the family of the late William Ewart, Esq., a gen- 
tleman whose good fortune in trade, at Liverpool, was 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 221 

scarcely second to any other individual of that town. 
It is little more than twenty years since Mr. Ewart; 
added to his original Everton possessions by the puis 
chase of localities 25, e, 25, f, and 25, g, for (as on 
dits) £2000 paid down, and an annuity of £50 to the, 
late Mrs. Fisher for life. Mr. Ewart, who died 8th 
October, 1823, was the owner of the St. Domingo, 
estate for a short period, about the year 1811. The 
localities last purchased by Mr. Ewart, 25, e, f, g, 
are becoming valuable; their north front is exactly, 
opposite to that handsome pile of buildings- — the, 
Crescent of Everton : and the architect seems to have 
made the first of his operations by felling the timber, 
which grew on the borders of these fields, and by* 
intersecting the land with intended streets. 

Proceeding up Everton-brow, the next locality on 
the east to the last-named is that marked 1, L From, 
time immemorial, and until veiy recently, this place 
was pasture land, but its green sward is now ploughed 
up, and its site becomes rapidly covered with pile on 
pile of burnt clay : the cattle of the Liverpool dairy- 
men, which used to walk to this pasture, with little 
exertion, have now to proceed much further in quest 
of nutritive herbage. Amongst other domiciles lately 
erected on this last-named lot is that of the Misses 
Latham, the worthy aunts of Thomas Shaw, Esq., 
whose dwelling is opposite to Watmough-street ; and 
where those ladies are passing quiet and seemingly 
happy lives, practising and enjoying the rites of hos- 
pitality with a numerous and select circle of acquaint-. 



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222 HISTORY OF EVERTQN. 

ance. The other architectural erections, finished or 
in progress of completion, do not call for remark or 
notice here. 

The locality 1, k, which, on the east, adjoins the lot 
last-named, was a beautiful piece of land, but the 
formation of Shaw-street, and of other new roads, has 
materially changed its appearance, where, some few 
years ago, happy, jocund boys and girls were wont to 
disport in holiday time; but they must now seek a 
play-ground in some more remote sylvan scene, for 
the grassy, velvet covering of this place is destroyed. 
At the north-east part of this locality, which forms the 
north end of Shaw-street, a number of houses are 
erected, as has been before noticed. The views from 
the west parts of these habitations are commanding 
and delightful, and the street in their front is bold, 
spacious, and veiy wide.* 

The locality 1, n, is a pretty little garden spot, in 
the occupation of a very deserving man, Mr. Halliday, 
of the Everton coffee-house. Next to the last-named 
locality is that marked 1, m, on which the cottage 
styled " Prince Rupert's Quarters " stands, of which 
notice has been already taken in the section of " Anti- 
quities." There is, however, a small charming spot 
of land in the rear, or on the south of the cottage, 
which deserves some slight notice : it is said once to 

* It must not be omitted to state here, that Thomas Shaw, Esq., has 
given to the public road a long slip or slice of land from off the north 
side of this field (1, k), running from the north end of Shaw-street 
westwardly j — the land so given is, at its broadest part, near ten yards in 
breadth. 



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QENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 223 

have been a bowling-green, — it is the veritable domi- 
nion of privacy, and yet an admirer of fine views and 
busy scenes could not desire a better station, for from 
this commanding spot, during the live-long day, most 
interesting objects lie before, and pass in full view of, 
the observer; and from hence, there is little doubt, 
Prince Rupert directed many of his operations against 
Liverpool, during his memorable siege of that place, 
in the year 1644 — -tradition, indeed, declares that he 
formed a battery on this very platform. 

Adjoining the last-named, on the east, is locality 
65, a, which, in the year 1790, was the property of 
the late George Goring, Esq., who was a broker, and 
afterwards a merchant, much engaged in the trade of 
Liverpool, and who died 6th March, 1818, aged sixty- 
four years ; he was an affable, hilarious, obliging 
member of society ; and for many years actively and 
usefully employed, when his other avocations per- 
mitted, in gratuitously superintending the municipal 
affairs of the township. This property is still in the 
possession of his relatives, the Misses Green, who are 
the nieces of the late Mr. Goring: at present the 
place is in the occupancy of Mr. George Syers, of 
his Majesty's customs, of whom it must suffice to say 
here, that he is not behind his neighbours in the prac- 
tice of hospitality, good fellowship, and philanthropy. 

Some time during the last century, an officer of the . 
revenue chanced to be invited to the house of Mr. 
Goring, who entertained him with a bottle of most 
excellent wine ; but before the last of the vinous 



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224 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

liquid was poured out, a handsome seal, which was 
dangling from the host's watch, caught the officer's 
attention, who, at his own request, was permitted to 
examine the bauble; for which condescension Mr. 
Goring, a few days afterwards, was visited with a 
charge for single duty on armorial bearings, and 
given to understand, that he was indebted to the 
goodness of his wine for the favour of exemption- 
from double duty, or that part of the charge which- 
goes into the officer's own pocket. Mr. Goring, 
it is said, properly appreciated his being favoured 
in this way. 

Adjoining the last named, on the east, is locality 
C6, a, which, in the year 1790, was the property of 
the late Robert Green, Esq., once an eminent silver- 
smith, of Liverpool. Mr. Green erected the hand- 
some house now standing on this lot, at the same 
time with that which Mr. Goring built on his ad- 
joining lot — they may, indeed, be styled twins, being, 
as it were, under one roof. This place also belongs 
to the Misses Green, and is tenanted by a respectable, 
family of the Society of Friends, named Robson. 

Locality 48, a, is the next on. the east to the last 
named, where is also a good house, erected, some 
fifty years ago, by the late Anthony Tristram, Esq., 
whose exertions in the business of a saddler, at 
Liverpool, were well rewarded. In the year 1790, 
the place belonged to his daughter, the late Miss 
Dorothy Tristram, and is now the property of George 
Brown, Esq., who, as a denizen of Everton, will be 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 225 

noticed hereafter. This villa is in the occupation of 
a near relative of Mr. Brown, being the residence of 
Mr. George Withers, formerly a merchant, but now 
the able secretary and practical conductor of affairs 
at Lloyd's, in Liverpool. 

In a cluster, on the east and south of the last 
named villa, are the localities 25, a, 25, b, 25, c, and 
25, d, all of which were the property of the late John 
Seacome, Esq., and were sold by his executors to the 
late John Fisher, Esq., an eminent ship-builder of 
Liverpool, and were long in his occupancy. Mr. 
Fisher, who died in 1791, married a daughter of the 
above-named Mr. Seacome, who resided at this place 
until her death, which took place in the year 1812. 
The good family-house and out-buildings on this 
property were erected by the late Mr. Seacome, and 
altogether form an agreeable residence, there being 
sufficient land annexed to amuse, and even tolerably 
well employ, an amateur agriculturist. 

The Seacomes of Everton have, for a very long 
period, been proprietors of lands and other possessions 
in the township : at times they have been most evi- 
dently conspicuous characters in the place, and long 
ranked as nobles of Everton. Much of the landed 
property of the last of the Everton Seacomes remains 
in the possession of his grandchildren of other names, 
and particularly that of Ellison. The name of Sea- 
come is extinct at Everton, or lies dormant in the 
town's documents, and in old title deeds ; but it 

Q 



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226 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

will, doubtless, long live in the grateful recollection of 
its heirs. 

Most of the localities bearing the figures 16 now 
belong to the Ellison family, chiefly indeed to the 
very deserving and respectable head of that family, 
Seacome Ellison, of Litherland, Esq. 

Mr. Ellison has recently sold a field, 16,/, for 
nearly £3000, which, together with two other closes of 
land, measuring in the whole 4a. 1r. 6p., were bought 
by one of his ancestors on the 29th July, 1 724, for 
£84 10s., and are leasehold for 1000 years, at a quit 
rent of Is. per annum per acre. * 

In the year 1817, the parties interested in the late 
Mr. Seacome's property obtained an act of parlia- 
ment, principally with a view of obtaining the liberty 
to dispose of it instanter if advantageous occasions 
offered ; for under the restrictions of Mr. Seacome's 
will, no sale of his lands could be effected until a 
youth, then of tender years, became of age. At the 
time the act was procured the measure seemed 
politic, but it was an expensive undertaking, and the 
youth became of age before an opportunity arrived to 
dispose of much of the property. To exemplify the 
probable advantages which the power to sell would 
have given, it may be stated, that one field of the 
late Mr. Seacome's was, soon after the act was pro- 
cured, contracted for at the price of £2900, whilst 
the rental of that field at the time of sale only 
yielded some £40 per annum, and which it had 
never exceeded. 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 227 

There is a rough historical draft, or, more properly 
speaking, a technical law brief, touching certain 
events in which the township of Everton is deeply 
concerned; a sort of investigation into the claim of 
Everton heing independent of the manor of West 
Derby : it is a document of investigation and proof, 
substantiating the fact that Everton is, and has been 
from time immemorial, a manor of itself. This draft, 
or history, is deposited in the town's chest, where it 
has long lain ; and in the schedule of the contents of 
that chest it is denominated, " Seacome 1 s History of 
Everton." This draft of Mr. Seacome' s is a counter- 
part, verbatim et literatim, of the account of Everton 
which Mr. Gregson has inserted in his " Fragments 
of Lancashire ;" thus, it is reduced almost to a cer- 
tainty, that Mr. Gregson's data were derived from 
Mr. Seacome's draft : indeed he states that his data 
were derived from "the MS. of Isaac Green, Esq.," 
and that MS. may have been, and most likely was, 
drawn up by Mr. Green, for it wears the appearance 
of a lawyer's writing. But the compiler of the MS.> 
be he either Mr. Seacome or Mr. Green, has, at 
great pains, collected some excellent and valuable 
information relative to, and directly bearing on, the 
origin and construction of the independence of the 
manor of Everton. After strict investigation, there 
is the strongest reason to conclude that the MS. 
now deposited in the town's chest was the property 
of a John Seacome, Esq., who was an alderman 
of Liverpool in the early part of the last century, 



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228 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

and ' being his property, it acquired the name of 
"Seacome's History of Everton;" and with much 
shew of veracity, the late Isaac Green, Esq. might 
be declared to be the author. The gist of Mr. Sea- 
come' s MS. is given in this treatise, blended with 
various other matter, so as to connect the isolated 
parts, and give to the whole a more regular and 
historical character. 

The localities now under consideration, marked 
with the figures 25, are the property of Messrs. J. 
and R. Fisher, shipwrights, of Liverpool, gentlemen, 
whose loyal zeal and respectability are well known 
in that town. 

The mansion of the Seacomes has, since the de- 
mise of Mrs. Fisher, been in the occupancy of very 
many tenants ; amongst others, our most exemplary 
minister, the Rev. R. P. Buddicpm, dwelt there for a 
time; and very recently a good and most excellent 
lady, Mrs. Kewley, died there. 

The locality 25, b y is a charming and valuable spot, 
and the township has lately purchased a narrow slip 
from the east side of it, to effect an improvement in 
the highway, which has been considerably widened 
at that part: the road thereabout is now safe and 
commodious for all kinds of vehicles, and for passen- 
gers on horseback and on foot. This road, until very 
lately, was the only main thoroughfare, or line of 
communication, between the village of Everton and 
the London-road; and three years ago, at this its 
north end, it was a narrow and inconvenient passage. 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 229 

and as unsightly as it was inconvenient. In making 
this improvement to the road, it became necessary to 
fell a row of stately trees, which stood on the east 
border of the field, and were an ornament to the scene. 
This is the only circumstance in the whole transaction 
to be regretted. 

On the south of the last-named locality stands that 
which on the map is marked 18, a. Of all the large 
patches of land in Everton, there are few, if any, that 
exceed this lot in value and beauty : it has a most 
extensive frontage to Everton-lane, is of great, though 
irregular width, and possesses most charming and 
extensive prospects on its whole west line. Long did 
this delightful spot remain in verdure, coveted by all 
villa-projectors, and tantalizing all speculative builders; 
but at length, in the year 1824, the owner, James 
Plumpton, Esq., who seems to be possessed of spirit 
and taste, commenced architectural operations there 
himself, and has constructed some veiy delightful 
villas. Some lots Mr. Plumpton sold, and on others 
he is erecting several very handsome mansions. 

The northernmost of these buildings belongs to 
Adam Cliffe, Esq., a denizen of Everton, and a most 
respectable merchant of Liverpool. At this house the 
Misses Coleman have established a seminary of the 
first class, where respectable females are boarded and 
educated. The situation of this seminary might 
almost tempt parents and guardians to place their 
treasures in its pure air; but if confidence may be 
placed in report, there are also many other advantages 



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230 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

obtainable at this establishment, viz., the care, kind- 
ness, and judicious instruction bestowed on the fair 
and tender charges committed to the guardianship of 
its talented and land conductresses. 

The four neighbouring villas on the south of Mr. 
Cliffe's are the property of Mr. Plumpton, and occu- 
pied by Daniel Buchanan, Esq., Thomas Sands, Esq., 
Mrs. Wain, and W. Latham, Esq. The next villa 
on the south is that of W. Fosberry, Esq.; and more 
southerly, stands that of James Logan, Esq. 

In Everton-lane, very nearly opposite to where 
the house of A. Cliffe, Esq. now stands, a severe 
conflict took place, in the year 1812, between a body 
of the police of Liverpool, and a band of robbers. 
Those marauders had frequently stopped and robbed 
the passengers in various hackney-coaches which occa- 
sionally plied on the outskirts of Liverpool ; at length 
the police of Liverpool resorted to stratagem, with a 
view of capturing and punishing this daring gang of 
banditti. The police-men, being well armed, placed 
themselves in a hackney-coach, soon after it was dark, 
and proceeded leisurely over Edge-hill • and when they 
arrived at the point before-named they were assaulted 
by the robbers, who lay in ambush at the west end of 
Mill-lane : a desperate conflict ensued with fire-arms 
and sharp weapons, but, strange to state! no lives 
were lost. The robbers were at last discomfited, some 
of them were secured, but a few fled and escaped, 
taking their course over Mr. Plumpton' s field, in which 
somq of their cast-away fire-arms were found the next 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 231 

morning. The experiment succeeded, for since then 
hackney-coaches have been safely permitted to ply in 
this district. 

One of the police-men, of bulky size, was jeeiingly 
likened by his fellows to Falstaff, for, like the fat 
knight, he foundered on the field of battle, and was 
picked up when the fray was over, to join in boasting 
of the prowess exhibited by the victorious party. 
Those of the robbers who were taken were tried, and 
three of them were found guilty, and executed at 
Lancaster, in April, 1813. 

In Gore's newspaper, of 19th November, 1812, is 
the following account of the affair just noticed. " On 
Friday night last, about nine o'clock, as a party of 
police-officers and special constables proceeded in a 
hackney-coach along the road leading from Everton 
towards Low-hill, they were attacked by five men, 
armed with a blunderbuss and pistols, who after break- 
ing the coach windows, opened the doors and de- 
manded their money. Upon finding that the party 
inside were armed, the robbers fired into the coach, 
and one of the constables having suffered himself to 
be robbed, agreeable to the directions he had received, 
a desperate affray took place, three of the constables 
were, unfortunately, soon disabled, one by a slug 
through his arm, another by several cuts on the 
head, and another by a severe cut over the eye ; we 
are happy to say, however, that no lives were lost, 
and two of the villains were secured. Two more 
were apprehended in the course of Saturday night." 



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232 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

As one of the lords of Everton's soil, James 
Plumpton, Esq. must have individual notice; — he 
is also the descendant of a family which has been long 
connected with Everton, as proprietors of valuable 
lands in the township. The Plumptons dwelt, for 
a considerable time, at a good, but somewhat old- 
fashioned house on the borders of Low-hill, about 
fifty yards distant from the south-east comer of the 
Gregson-villa, where the present Mr. Plumpton owns 
several extensive parcels of land. If matters in Ever- 
ton progress, as they appear likely to do, it may be 
expected, with great probability, that the operations 
of Mr. Plumpton, and the uses to which he is putting 
his landed property, will result in his reaping a some- 
what splendid income. There has been a singular 
peculiarity running through several generations of 
this family, a peculiarity that might be emphatically 
called single-heirship ; — for the present James Plump* 
ton, Esq. is the only child of an only child's only 
child. It is due to Mr. Plumpton to state, that he 
has often readily and politely afforded information, 
useful, and indeed needful, to the compilation of this 
treatise. Mr. Plumpton now temporarily resides at 
the old-house before named, at Low-hill, awaiting the 
completion of the mansion he is building in Everton 
village. 

On the south of Mr. Plumpton' s locality, 18, a, is 
the burial ground of the Anabaptists of Liverpool. 
This place was gratuitously presented to them, on the 
1st March, 1707, by Hannah and Daniel Fabious, 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 233 

who then dwelt at a house which stood on the site 
of the Gregson-vUla. The condition of the gift w r as, 
that the place should ever after be used by the Ana- 
baptists as a place of burial. It is described as 
" lying on the east of Chapel-field/' from which, it is 
to be presumed, a chapel may at some remote period 
have been in that very field, or somewhere in its 
vicinage. This quiet and compact cemetery is, how- 
ever, too small for the burial uses of the religious 
community, or society, to which it belongs • and its 
insufficiency of size may have originally led to the 
formation of the extensive and every way more appro- 
priate sanctuary of the dead already described — the 
Necropolis. 

This section must not be closed without noticing 
the church now building in the south-east quarter of 
Shaw-street, which bids fair to be an ornament to the 
scenery around; and any beauties of style it may be 
found to possess, when it is completed, will be con- 
spicuously exhibited, for it will stand on a command- 
ing site. As far as the elevation of this church has 
proceeded, it is highly creditable to the architect's 
ability ; and as he is young, it is not only sincerely 
hoped, but it is to be presumed, that the whole, both 
of the design and execution, may win him a character 
for talent, and lead him to celebrity. This church will 
be erected with a fund raised in subscription shares, 
under the superintendence, and according to the 
designs, of Mr. John Broadbent, surveyor and archi- 
tect, of Liverpool, and which, it is probable, will be 



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234 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

named St. Maiy. Contrary to customary usage in 
such matters, the proprietors will build the church in 
the first instance, and after its erection procure an act 
of parliament, under the clauses of which its affairs are 
to be ruled and conducted. The Rev. Mr. Tattershall 
is spoken of as its intended minister. The edifice is 
admirably situated, being in a quarter that has long 
stood in need of such a place of public worship. 

WEST DISTRICT. 

The west district of Everton is bounded on the 
north by the lands of Kirkdale ; on the east by north 
and south Netherfield-roads ; on the south by Ever- 
ton-brow ; and on the west by the lands of Liverpool. 
This district is so closely interwoven* with the lands, 
liberties, and houses of Liverpool, on its whole west 
front, as to create already in the south part of it some 
difficulty in nicely and precisely distinguishing the 
lines and limits of the two townships ; the complexity 
is particularly evident in and nigh to Fox-street and 
Great Homer-street, where the sinuosities of the 
boundary lines are most irregular and perplexing, 
running in a zig-zag way, forming many short and 
sudden changes of direction; and when the surface 
shall be covered over with buildings, as it is very 
likely shortly to be, much difficulty will be placed in 

* It is very laudably determined to go to parliament this session (1830) 
to have the boundaries of Liverpool, on the west of Everton, distinctly; 
and, as it may be termed, symmetrically defined. If the matter be 
brought to a conclusion in time for the appendix to this work, it will be 
inserted there. 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 235 

the way of all who may be interested in defining and 
ascertaining the true and exact boundaries ; many 
buildings will be placed there with parts seated in 
two townships, as already are some houses and locali- 
ties in that neighbourhood.* It would be an act 
materially serving and accommodating the public, 
and* would relieve the authorities in their operations 
touching rates, assessments, and taxatory collections, 
were the inhabitants of the towns of Liverpool and 
Everton mutually to fix more definite, clear, and 
conspicuous boundary lines in this quarter. Suppose 
it were agreed, that the east side of Fox-street, and 
the west side of Great Homer-street, should form 
the boundary lines thereabout ; such agreement 
would give a palpable distinguishment to the liberties 
of the two townships, so far as those streets extend, 
and would impose the responsibility on Everton, to 
keep Great Homer-street in repair, but none other west 
of it; and on Liverpool, that of Fox-street, but none 
other east of it : nor need such adjustment be con- 
fined to this particular quarter, it may be beneficially 
extended northward, to Mrs. Potter s land, and again 
in the rear, or on the east side of Soho-street. As to 
Everton, similar arrangements might be made with 
West Derby and other townships; in particular as 
regards the strip of land opposite the Necropolis, the 



* This passage was written early in 1829; it is left unexpunged, not- 
withstanding the projected alteration of the boundaries; as it may serve 
to elucidate the necessity of having some better defined and more distinct 
line of boundary drawn. 



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236 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

land behind Mr. Formby's house, near Brunswick- 
road, the Boundary-lane lands, &c. &c. 

The road called Everton-brow has, from time imme- 
morial, been the main passage from Liverpool to 
Everton; its first known name was Causeway-lane, 
afterwards it long went by the name of Loggerhead- 
lane, and for the last forty years it has been styled 
Everton-brow, until recently, the lower or west end has 
been honoured with the more dignified title of the Cres- 
cent. This road was formerly narrow, and in poor 
plight. It may serve to give an insight into its former 
state, and also to shew some other points connected 
with the neighbourhood of that thoroughfare, to use 
the words of an elderly gentleman, who well remem- 
bered the circumstances of which he treats ; " The 
communication (from Everton) with Liverpool was 
through a deep sandy lane, the cops or hedges on 
each side not being many yards asunder, nor was 
there any parapet or foot path to accommodate pedes- 
trians : just within the limits of Liverpool, at a long 
low house, where the late Mr. Nicholson long resided, 
was a small ale-house, near to a dyer's pond — the 
latter surrounded with willows. This public-house 
was called the Loggerheads, and was of much cele- 
brity in former days, which it first obtained from the 
civility of the landlady, and the choice and nourishing 
qualities of the viands and beverage she dispensed; 
the sign was two heads, the motto, f We three logger- 
heads be.'" The informant somewhat cynically goes 
on to say, " Whether or not the sign was intended as a 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 237 

perpetual monitor to the nobles of Everton, history has 
left us in the dark." The same house has recently 
been again licensed, and is now open to the public 
under the name of "The Loggerheads Revived." 

The first object to be noticed in the west district of 
Everton is a handsome, imposing pile of buildings, 
which, commencing at the west end of Everton-brow, 
extends about two-thirds of the length of the north 
side of that road ; this place is named Everton Cres- 
cent, and consists of sixteen excellent houses, well 
calculated for the reception and uses of large and 
respectable families, most of the mansions affording, 
in their interior construction and arrangement, ample 
space and fitness to entertain extensive parties. The 
apartments of these houses appropriated to banqueting 
and festive purposes, and those reserved for dormi- 
tories and dress, are neatly, nay, in many instances, 
elegantly finished ; there are also many of those snug, 
warm, and cheerful apartments, so admirably adapted 
to the taste, comfort, and domestic propensities of 
John Bull, where daily and hourly delicious, racy, 
and truly British scenes of domestic felicity are 
enacted. 

The formation of Everton Crescent originated, some 
twenty-two years ago, with a few spirited gentlemen 
of Liverpool, of whom Messrs. Webster, Bibby, High- 
field, and Scholfield were the chief, if not the whole. 
In the year 1807, those gentlemen bought the two 
fields (15, n, 15, o) on the south fronts of which the 
Crescent stands, and shortly after the purchase, com- 



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238 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

menced the erection of the handsome pile which now 
adorns the place; the four centre, or single-fronted 
houses, were the first built. The project of those 
enterprising individuals has been completely effected, 
and it is hoped with pecuniary advantage to them- 
selves; be that, however, as it may, for so highly 
embellishing this charming spot, they are entitled to 
the praise and thanks of the public. 

The Crescent of Everton may be considered the 
thread of buildings by which the towns of Liverpool 
and Everton first became closely and intimately inter- 
woven — the first link of the chain which now connects 
the two townships so closely together. After the 
Crescent had been projected, and partly constructed, 
other buildings, of much smaller dimensions, began to 
be erected at its back or north side; nor can it be 
denied that the vicinage of these smaller domiciles 
diminishes the beauty of the Crescent, and even robs it 
of many advantages which it possessed at the outset. 

It will not be expected that individual notice can 
be taken of all persons who. dwell in dense and nume- 
rously populated parts of the township ; the biographer 
cannot, even in brevity, use his pen without data to 
work with ; and it is owing to the want of it, and not 
to disrespect or neglect, that many worthy and re- 
spectable individuals who are, or have been, denizens 
of Everton, are passed by without notice ; but every 
opportunity will be taken to treat of the lords of the 
soil, and of other property in the township. 

A worthy and wealthy member of the Society of 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 239 

Friends dwells, or very lately dwelt, at one of the 
Crescent mansions — Isaac Had wen ; and from another 
of the Everton Crescent mansions the late Nicholas 
Waterhouse (the younger of the two persons of that 
name who have dwelt at Everton,) was somewhat sud- 
denly removed from this to a better world. The Lord 
giveth, and he taketh away, and all that he does is 
good and wise : thus the pious and resigned mind 
may reason ; yet greatly sorrowful were a multitude 
of persons at the sudden removal, in the strength of 
manhood, of the late Nicholas Waterhouse, from his 
afflicted family and numerous friends. 

As a proprietor of lands in the township, as a 
daughter of an Everton noble, and more particularly 
as due to her own genuine worth, Miss Rowe, who 
also dwells at the Crescent of Everton, is entitled to 
notice. Miss Rowe is the last surviving daughter of 
the late John Rowe, Esq., of whom mention at large 
has already been made. With a disposition piously 
and morally disposed, a splendid competence, and a 
cheerful mind, this lady passes her earthly probation 
contentedly and exemplarily. Many particulars in 
this treatise have been kindly communicated by Miss 
Rowe. 

At the easternmost mansion of the Crescent dwells 
John Wright, Esq., an alderman of Liverpool. Mr. 
Wright is one of the most popular members of the 
common council of Liverpool, there being a truly 
praiseworthy spirit of patriotism and independence 



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240 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

in his public conduct — but his biography belongs to 
the annals of Liverpool. 

On the east of the Crescent, separated only by the 
intervention of Watmough-street, stands another hand- 
some, - imposing pile of buildings. This cluster has 
been erected within the last year or two, by brothers 
of the family of Holmes, gentlemen of old and most 
highly respectable standing in the commercial walks 
of Liverpool ; at the two easternmost of these man- 
sions, the brothers, John and Henry Holmes, Esqrs. 
reside. Another of these last-noticed mansions is in 
the occupancy of Christopher H. Jones, Esq., gold 
and silver-smith, of Liverpool. Of Mr. Jones it may 
be briefly said, that he is of suave manners in society, 
and prompt and honourable in his public transactions* 

Adjoining the uppermost of Messrs. Holmes' pre- 
mises on the east, is locality 52, a, now the property 
and residence of Latham Hanmer, Esq., of his Ma- 
jesty's customs, who has, from youthhood to this the 
autumn of his life, honourably and diligently per- 
formed his public and private duties ; and fortune has 
amply repaid his diligence and attention, as she gene- 
rally does in similar cases. 

The erection of the mansion that graces Mr. Han- 
mer's villa was commenced about the year 1790, by a 
Mr. William Mayor, continued by the late Nathaniel 
Mc Knight, Esq., and nearly completed as it is now 
by Benjamin Grey, Esq. There is a narrow private 
road or passage on the east, adjoining the south end 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 241 

of Mr. Hanmer's locality. The privacy is established 
by the presence of a gate, which is occasionally closed 
— the public are generally permitted to use this road, 
though it is really and bona-fide private property. 

In the year 1790, locality 55, a, which is the next 
on the east to Mr. Hanmer's, was the property of 
Edward Rogers, Esq., a most respectable merchant 
and broker of Liverpool ; the chief part of the elegant, 
and then thoroughly rural mansion which stands on 
this lot, was built by the afore-named Mr. Mayor. 
Since Mr. Rogers' time, this charming villa has been 
the property of various persons, and in the occupancy 
of several tenants ; at present it is the residence of 
Mrs. Barton, and the property of William Dixon, 
Esq., a gentleman who ranks high in the mercantile 
classes of Liverpool. Mr. Dixon long resided at this 
last mentioned mansion ; but some years ago removed 
to a handsome, commodious house, which he erected 
on the north part of this locality. During the dread- 
ful storm of the night of the 4th December, 1822, 
Mr. Dixon had the misfortune to lose two very lovely 
children, by the fall of some chimneys of the house at 
which Mrs. Barton now resides : the little innocents 
had not long retired to their couch, when the melan- 
choly occurrence took place. 

Mr. Dixon is a most respectable and energetic 
member of Everton's community; possessing, in a 
high degree, the tact so necessary for the execution 
and furtherance of public affairs, he has frequently 
stood forward to render the township good service, 

R 



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242 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

and it is hoped that he will long live to take an active 
part in the growing cares, and rapidly expanding 
municipal affairs of Everton. 

In the court of Mr. Dixon's present residence, a . 
fine female infant was cruelly exposed, on the 17th 
December, 1827, where it was left by its unnatural 
parents, and is now maintained at the township's 
charge, under the name of Rebecca Netherfield ; she 
is a healthy little girl, but, owing to a burn, is likely 
to be a cripple for life, the fingers of both hands having 
become so much contracted as to render it doubtful 
whether she ever will be able to use them to advantage. 

The next locality to Mr. Dixon's is that marked 
60, a> now the property and residence of Joseph Simp- 
son, Esq., collector of excise, Liverpool, a most cour- 
teous and obliging public officer, and an example for 
"Jacks in office;" indeed, were all public officers, 
in the performance of their duties, like this gentleman, 
that opprobious term would soon become obsolete. 

Just previous to the year 1 790, the late Henry Ross, 
Esq., a master-mariner of Liverpool, erected the ex- 
cellent house at which Mr. Simpson resides. Mr. 
Ross, and his very worthy eldest son, John, were 
men of great mechanical talent, the elder of whom 
much improved on the mode of steering vessels at 
sea; as to his widow, the late Mrs. Ellen Ross, who 
died 20th October, 1813, she was kindness personified. 
During the night of the great storm of January, 
1802, a chimney of Mrs. Ross's was blown down, the 
falling mass and fragments of which forced their way 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 243 

through the roof into a bed-chamber, where the late 
Mr. John Ross lay, who, despite of the storm, was 
sleeping soundly ; he was buried in the ruins, and all 
who approached the place were convinced that he was 
lost to his family and to the world for ever; with 
much trouble and caution, the rubbish was removed, 
and at length Mr. Ross was discovered, lying in a 
state of stupor; on examination, however, it was 
found that he had almost miraculously escaped with 
life ; a falling rafter having interposed a slight barrier 
of opposition to the weight of rubbish that lay over his 
body, and which, through the kind ordination of Pro- 
vidence, saved his life. It was said that the con- 
cussion or the fright had injured his head, but the 
assertion was erroneous : let his head, however, have 
sustained what damage it might, the writer of this 
passage well knows, that his heart sustained no injury, 
for after the accident it continued to beat as it had 
done before, with friendship and good-will to Iris 
fellows, equal to that of the purest philanthropist : he 
died at Messina, 17th March, 1816. 

On the north of Mr. Simpson's is the locality 57, «, 
the property and residence of the family of the late 
John Livingstone, Esq., a very successful merchant 
and underwriter of Liverpool. In early life he had 
been a master-mariner, and by talent, industry, and 
prudence raised himself to opulence. Some twelve 
months ago he fell a martyr to that monarch of pain — 
the gout. The aforenamed Mr. Mayor built the house 
of the late Mr. Livingstone, which was afterwards 



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244 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

owned and occupied by an eccentric member of the 
law, named Turner, from whose hands it fell into those 
of a Mr. Gibb, who, about twenty years ago, erected 
the excellent house which stands on the north part of 
this lot. 

Adjoining the last-named is locality 56, a, on which 
is a spacious house, erected by the late Thomas Dick- 
enson, Esq., and now belonging to and occupied by 
Mrs. Marsh. After Mr. Dickenson, this villa was 
owned and occupied by a gentleman who had raised 
himself to affluence, lived here awhile in splendour, 
and died at Liverpool, in straitened circumstances — 
an every day lesson this, which many read, but few 
heed. On the north of Mrs. Marsh's villa are two 
snug, commodious, and comfortable dwellings, erected 
by the father of Mr. Anderton, who dwells at the 
northernmost of them. In 1790 they were the pro- 
perty of a Mr. Powell, agent to the London cheese- 
ships, and now belong to a Mr. Kevan, of Liverpool. 

There is a narrow passage or road on the north part 
of the last-named premises. Twenty-five years ago 
this road led, to the westward, as far only as the east 
part of locality 1, rv, but for more than twenty years 
the passage has been free to the public, from Nether- 
field-road South to Fox-street, and may be now con- 
sidered a public thoroughfare. On the north of Mr. 
Kevan's premises, and only separated therefrom by 
the passage just named, is locality 31, d, on the east 
part of which stands a truly elegant, though mode- 
rately-sized mansion, erected by Thomas Huson, Esq., 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 245 

in the year 1809. Mr. Huson, who was a master- 
mariner, and afterwards a most respectable merchant, 
long resided at this charming villa, which is at present 
tenanted by F. Lapage, Esq., a young merchant, 
who has just commenced his commercial career, in a 
respectable line, at Liverpool. A cottage, bam, &c, 
which stood on the site of this mansion, have been 
noticed in the section of "Antiquities." Searching 
into antiquated matters, it would appear that this was 
the nearest spot to Liverpool on which any Everton 
dwelling stood in ancient times, and so it continued 
to be for a great length of time. 

Locality 16, b, stands next on the north to Mr. 
Huson's villa. Why the first-named property still 
remains unbuilt on, is marvellous ; it is a choice spot 
of land, and most invitingly offers itself to the gentle- 
man who would wish to construct an agreeable villa, 
or to the builder who might look to profit by erecting 
a dozen or a score of good houses. 

On the north border of the last-noticed lot is Prince 
Edwin-street, a good bold street, which has been 
formed out of the southern sides of localities 22, c, 
and 12, d> penetrating also through the localities 
marked 1, w, and 1, x. All these four parcels of land 
have changed owners since the year 1790; until 
lately they were principally owned by a gentleman 
named Humphreys; but he has disposed of them 
in parts to several gentlemen, some of whom have 
formed elegant villas, and others are using their bar- 
gains speculatively, by selling the lands in small 



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246 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

parcels. The limit of this work will not permit minute 
descriptions of the thickly-settled parts of Everton, the 
observations, therefore, touching this street, must be 
concise. 

There are nine houses on the north side of Prince 
Edwin-street, almost the whole of which are handsome, 
commodious erections, having on the south good and 
useful garden-grounds; the easternmost of which 
belongs to William Appleton, Esq., a respectable 
merchant, and a worthy man. At the westernmost 
of these domiciles resides Mr. Benjamin Cope, an 
architect and surveyor, of Liverpool, who was the first 
to commence architectural operations in this street, 
where he has formed many excellent villas, all of 
which, except his own residence, he disposed of, as 
they were completed. Mr. George Robinson resides 
near to Mr. Cope, in an excellent house, which was 
built by the former a few years ago. Of Mr. Robin- 
son's intimate connexion with Everton, more will be 
noticed hereafter. A good part of the south side of 
Prince Edwin-street, in the west, has recently been 
purchased, in the way of business, by Messrs. Lowndes 
and Robinson, most respectable solicitors of Liverpool. 
In this quarter great changes are taking place, — new 
buildings constantly starting into view. The incon- 
venience of copyhold tenure begins to be felt here, 
owing to the subdivision of the lands into manifold lots.* 

* It has been stated to the author, that Everton copyhold lots may be 
enfranchised, or made lands of inheritance, on the payment, after domi- 
ciles are erected thereon, of one whole year's rent to the lord of the manor. 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 247 

At a charming villa on the south side, and near to 
the upper or east end of Prince Edwin-street, resides 
David Hodgson, Esq., a most respectable merchant 
of Liverpool ; this villa was formed by the late Mr. 
Roger Adamson, who, in the first instance, built a 
small house, so planned as to be easily converted into 
kitchens, servants' -hall, and servants' dormitories, 
at which Mr. Adamson resided the necessary time, 
entered into a composition for taxes, and afterwards 
built the handsome mansion that now stands on' the 
lot: it is perhaps supererogatory to say, that Mr. 
Adamson paid no more taxes for the great mansion 
than he had done under composition for the small 
building first erected. 

Returning now to travel descriptively along the 
skirts of the district, the compiler proceeds to state, 
that on the north side, at the upper end of Prince 
Edwin-street, stands a handsome pile of buildings, 
consisting of two commodious, delightful, and it may 
be said, elegant dwellings : these villas were formed 
in the year 1812, by the Rev. Jonathan Brooks, at 
present of Everton-lane, and William Wainwright, 
Esq., the talented and much respected secretary to 
the Liverpool Office at London. The Rev. Mr. 
Brooks dwelt for some years at the villa he formed 
here, which is now tenanted by Samuel Staniforth, 
Esq., an alderman of Liverpool, and chief director of 
the stamp department in and for this district. Mr. 
Wainwright did not reside at his villa ; he disposed 



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248 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

of it to the late Charles Sydebotham, Esq., unto whose 
heir, Greenway, Esq., it now belongs. 

On the north of Mr. Greenway's villa lies locality 
7, b, which in the year 1790 belonged to the late 
William Clarke, Esq., banker, of Liverpool, and is 
now the property of William Brown, Esq. and his 
family, Mr. Brown having married the daughter of 
the late owner of these premises, John Brown Esq., 
formerly an alderman of Liverpool, and who died at 
this villa, 11th March, 1810, aged 74 years. The 
mansion that graces this villa was commenced by 
the late William Skelhorn, Esq., of Liverpool, and 
completed by the late Mr. Brown, who also erected 
the stables, and formed the extensive stabling esta- 
blishment which is placed on locality 27, a, on the 
east side of Netherfield-road, opposite unto Mr. 
Brown's villa. 

The encroachment of buildings from Liverpool, 
pushing themselves cancer-like into Everton's bosom, 
tends much to rob the genteel residences in this 
neighbourhood of many advantages they originally 
possessed. On the north, adjoining Mr. Brown's 
villa, is locality 34, b, where Miss Ellison, a lady of 
cheerful, neighbourly, and truly frieudly habits and 
feelings, has long resided. This snug little domicile, 
in the year 1790, was the property of a Mr. Harrison, 
one of an old-standing family in the township. 
About twelve months ago, W. Brown, Esq. pur- 
chased this diminutive villa, together with the east 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 249 

part of locality 34, a, so far as runs westward until in 
a line with the west end of locality 58, a. On the 
north of Miss Ellison's residence, at a few paces dis- 
tant, is locality 58, a, which, in the year 1790, was the 
property of a Mr. Thomas Wareing. The greater por- 
tion of this lot, (being the east part of it) is now the 
property of William Robinson, Esq., who was long an 
eminent stationer and bookseller of Liverpool. There 
were formerly an old cottage and a barn on Mr. 
Robinson's part of this lot, but that gentleman look 
them down, and in 1801 constructed a handsome, 
commodious dwelling-house, on the north part of his 
property, at which he long resided ; more recently he 
has erected another excellent house on the south, 
where he now resides. These are two most delightful 
and desirable villas, wearing a truly pleasing air of 
neatness and gentility. 

Mr .Robinson has realized ahandsome independence, 
and lives in a state which some one has styled " otium 
cum dignitate;" his charming residence is so admirably 
situated, that it combines in itself the advantages of a 
town and country residence. The inhabitants of 
Everton are much indebted to Mr. Robinson for his 
various gratuitous exertions during a long series of 
years in the township's affairs; indeed, for nearly 
thirty years, whenever his serviceable exertions have 
been required, Mr. Robinson has seldom if ever failed 
to attend municipal meetings, nor has he ever shrunk 
from the burthen of public duty; and in several in- 



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250 . HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

stances his exertions have heen of essential advantage 
to the township. 

At the northernmost of Mr. Robinson's villa dwells, 
with his very worthy mother, Mr. Thomas Wainright, 
a surgeon, who has lately commenced practice. 
There is very much to commend in this young gen- 
tleman's suave, agreeable, and polished manners ; 
that he is skilful, there is little doubt, which qualifica- 
tion therefore, united with his urbanity of manners 
and truly exemplary conduct, entitle him to receive 
the countenance and encouragement of the Everton 
community, and — but enough ; in such a community 
as that of Everton, talent and worth cannot languish. 

The remarks touching the impracticability of de- 
scriptively individualising the population of Prince 
Edwin-street, are applicable also to the population of 
Roscommon-street — a street which has been formed 
out of the south part of locality 22, b, its western part 
indeed penetrating somewhat into locality 23, e. 

Roscommon-street is now pretty closely studded 
with handsome dwelling-houses, each having a neat 
court or garden-grounds attached : this street is in- 
habited by veiy respectable persons, and by many 
who move in the upper spheres of Everton's society. 
At the westernmost house, on the south side of this 
street, dwells Mr. John Davies, who deserves not only 
notice but praise, for his enterprise and industry. 
Mr. Davies is professedly a cordwainer, but that 
trade may be deemed only secondary, as regards his 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 251 

other and more momentous operations; indeed, it would 
be no misnomer to style him architect and builder, 
for he has done much in these lines : he has materi- 
ally embellished Roscommon-street, by erecting, near 
to his own dwelling, several houses, whose exteriors 
axe as pleasingly handsome as their interiors are 
commodious and comfortable, and it may be said that 
they are finished with some degree of taste and even 
of elegance. 

Some excellent houses, on the south side of Roscom- 
mon-street, are the properties of George Johnson and 
Hugh James Sanderson, Esqrs.; these gentlemen are 
brothers-in-law, and, in addition to the houses just 
alluded to, they have recently made some extensive 
purchases near the mere, on localities 19, e, 19, f, 
30, a, and 30, 6, where they are erecting three ex- 
cellent mansions, and forming pleasant villas. The 
Johnsons are a wealthy family from Ireland; Mr. 
Sanderson is a most respectable and enterprising 
merchant, of talent and integrity, carrying on busi- 
ness at Liverpool; and, like numbers of other mer- 
chants of that town, by residing at Everton, daily, 
and more especially nightly, he solaces himself with 
quietude and pure air. It is here that the very 
worthy Mrs. Wiatt must be noticed ; she is the widow 
of a gentleman who led the way in the improvements 
made in the north parts of Everton, near to where the 
church now stands. This cheerful lady, together 
with her sister (also a widow), resides at what might 
be termed, with no very great exaggeration, a petty 



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252 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

paradise, seated at the east end of Roscommon-street, 
on the north side : it is a place, if the term may be 
used, of public privacy; its front is ever adorned 
with the richest treasures of Flora, by handmaidens or 
handmen who never lose sight of neatness and order. 

The late Thomas Wiatt, Esq. was an eminent soli- 
citor of Liverpool, who, about thirty years ago, com- 
menced embellishing the northern part of Everton, by 
erecting some very excellent mansions, and transform- 
ing its almost barren lands into pleasant villas, creat- 
ing for each a fertile garden and delightful pleasure 
grounds ; sheltering them with shrubs and trees from 
the storms to which this part of Everton is particularly 
exposed. Before Mr. Wiatt' s time, individuals, mer- 
chants, or other men of wealth, settling at Everton, 
only directed their attention to their own lots, which 
they improved, and frequently greatly embellished; 
(the late Joseph Rose, Esq., in some degree, may 
be excepted ;) but Mr. Wiatt erected mansion after 
mansion, which he successively occupied himself, 
or, in common parlance, gave them a " house- 
warming/ ' and then, like the settlers of the western 
parts of the United States, he would dispose of his 
"improvement," and proceed to "clear and improve" 
other waste and half wild spots. That quarter or 
part of Everton where Mr. Wiatt first began ' his 
operations is now scarcely second to any, in the beauty 
of its appearance and in its value, and is annually 
becoming more and more embellished : — Mr. Wiatt 
died on the 7th January, 1811. 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 253 

Eveiy one who beholds the beautiful villa of John 
Carson, Esq- must be gratified with its appearance ; 
it forms a pleasing, picturesque feature in Ever- 
ton's delightful scenery. In the year 1790, this place 
was the property and residence of the late Joseph 
Rose, Esq., a gentleman who, some little while before 
his decease, had formed, for an individual, what might 
almost be termed gigantic plans, and, had he lived, 
there is little doubt that long ere this the lands he 
owned in Everton would have been closely covered 
with the habitations of men, having laid out many 
streets, and contemplated the building of a multitude 
of dwellings. To the streets that he formed he in- 
variably gave the names of classic authors, such as 
Homer, Virgil, Roscommon, Dryden, &c, and to one 
street in Liverpool the semi-ludicrous cognomen of 
Sawney Pope (Alexander Pope). It is not, however, 
to be taken for granted that Mr Rose was deeply 
versed in "literary lore," it was more as a mark of 
admiration, than any extent of knowledge he possessed 
of those authors, which caused Mr. Rose to compliment 
their memory in the way he selected. 

Mr. Rose built the mansion, and resided himself at 
the viUa, where Mi\ Carson now dwells; the latter 
gentleman purchased the place soon after Mr. Rose's 
death (which took place on the 27th March, 1802), 
and has ever since resided there. Mr. Rose pos- 
sessed a little of the sjpice of eccentricity — but this is 
also supererogatory, for men — aye, and women too, in 
general, are little other than machines of eccentricity. 



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254 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

The present owner and occupier of this villa, John 
Carson, Esq., has been a favourite of Fortune ; the 
goddess has long smiled on him, both as a master- 
mariner, and as a merchant ; and it is not her fault, 
if he is not now enjoying all the comfort and content 
which prosperous men can possibly desire. 

The next locality, on the north to that of Mr. 
Carson's, is marked 23, a, and is now incorporated 
with 23, b y the whole forming a beautiful villa, the 
property of Richard Dobson, Esq., who resides at the 
handsome mansion erected on the east part by Thomas 
Bateman, Esq., of Manchester, who owned, and re- 
sided at tins place for a few years. Mr. Dobson is a 
cotton broker, of the first class, in Liverpool, and is 
reputed to possess skill and high integrity in his exten- 
sive transactions. 

To Mr. Dobson must be awarded an ample share 
of praise, for the attention he has long bestowed on 
that excellent institution, the Blue Coat Hospital of 
Liverpool, the interests of which have been long 
with Mr. Dobson of the highest consideration. And 
here, without confining the bearing of the remark to 
Mr. Dobson alone, it may be observed, that some 
cynics deem it a spirit of pride that works within 
and stimulates many persons to useful public exertions : 
be it so — it is, however, a species of pride that does 
good to man, — it is a noble, not a scornful pride; it 
is, indeed, that which even meek charity may coun- 
tenance, and heaven-bom pity patronize. 

The villas, in a line north and south with Mr. 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 255 

Dobson's, are all delightful places, and afford pleasure 
to those who view them from the west ; where, for a 
long extent, they grace and embellish the base of 
Everton-brow. 

In the year 1790, the localities 4, 6, c, d, e y and/, 
adjoining Mr. Dobson's on the north, were the pro- 
perty of the late Gill Slater, Esq., who converted 
them into a villa, and erected in the east part the 
stately mansion which now adorns the place : this 
villa is now, and for a considerable time past has 
been, the property of William Earle, Esq., one of the 
oldest standing of the most eminent merchants of 
Liverpool, the state of whose health has induced him, 
latterly, to prefer residing in a warmer climate than 
that of Everton. On high occasions Mr. Earle has 
come forward, and given active and influential aid in 
the township's public concerns, and most particularly 
at a time when government had well nigh taken from 
Everton its character of rural seclusion and respect- 
able quietude, by converting the St. Domingo man- 
sion and estate into a barrack and military exercising 
grounds. Separated from Mr. Earle's villa by locality 
3, k, is locality 24, a, on which stands a most excel- 
lent house, erected, some fifty or more years ago, by 
the late John Tarlton, Esq., a gentleman who realised 
a handsome fortune during the good old and highly 
prosperous times of the tradesmen of Liverpool. Mr. 
Tarlton died on the 25th July, 1815, aged 84 years, 
when this villa became the property of his worthy 
daughter, Miss Tarlton, who still resides there, highly 



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256 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

respected and esteemed by a large circle of friends 
and acquaintance. The polite kindness of Miss 
Tarlton has permitted this work to be embellished 
with the annexed view of the old Beacon; the 
original is in that lady's possession, and was taken on 
the spot nearly sixty years ago, by an amateur 
painter, a friend of her late father. 

Adjoining Miss Tarlton's villa, on the north, is 
locality 3, i, which the late John Mather, Esq. 
formed into a most delightful villa, and about twenty 
years ago, he erected a capital mansion, with suitable 
out-offices, at its east part. The late Mr. Mather 
dwelt for some time at this villa, which is now the 
property, and in the occupation, of his son, John 
P. Mather, Esq., a gentleman extensively engaged 
(as was his father) in the trade of that valuable 
staple of commerce, cotton ; a trade in which, formerly 
at least, all who prudently operated, enriched them- 
selves. The plan of Mr. Mather's mansion is most 
admirable, for the space of ground which it covers ; 
but were it to be attempted on a smaller scale, it 
would prove a failure. 

On the north of Mr. Mather's villa are localities 
35, a, and 35, ft, the property, in the year 1790, of 
the late James France, Esq. a Liverpool merchant, 
of the first consideration in his time. Mr. France 
erected the somewhat magnificent mansion which 
stands on locality 35, 6, but soon after its erection the 
architects proclaimed the place "over ornamented," 
a hint which Mr. France took, for he reduced and 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 257 

removed many decorations that might have been 
deemed embellishments in China, bnt nowhere else : 
of these scarcely a vestige can now be traced. This 
splendid and valuable villa is the property and resi- 
dence of John Cropper, Esq., a merchant of Liverpool, 
and wealthy — but it would be a repetition amounting 
to tautology successively to recite the fact of persons 
residing at Everton being wealthy. 

The two next localities on the north of Mr. Crop- 
per's villa, 12, 6, and 16, a, are valuable patches of 
land. A wide, handsome street might be advan- 
tageously formed in this neighbourhood, and the 
project would offer the highest advantages to the 
gentlemen of the north of Everton, were they them- 
selves to take it in hand; otherwise, it is most 
probable, jobbers, builders, and speculators will ere 
long effect the operation, on a scale, and in a manner, 
which may not only give annoyance to this now 
respectable neighbourhood, but may also much dete- 
riorate the beauty and the value of the villas that are 
already formed in this quarter. As to the other 
advantages which the formation of such road would 
afford to the inhabitants of this part of Everton, they 
are too manifest and self-evident to need enumeration 
here.. 

Though not actually offered for sale, yet both or 
either of these lots might be readily purchased ; that 
marked 12, J, is the property of the Tatlock family; 
and the other marked 16, a, is the property of Sea- 
come Ellison, Esq., a gentleman too liberally inclined, 

s 



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258 HISTORY OF EVEETON. 

and who feels too deep an interest in the township, 
to stand in the way of any project that might promise 
it an advantage. On the north of Mr. Ellison's field 
is locality 3, k, the property of Charles Horsfall, Esq., 
who in the year 181 1 erected the elegant, commodious 
mansion which stands at the east part, and formed 
the whole into a most charming villa, where he has 
resided ever since. 

Mr. Horsfall has long enjoyed that quiet, moderate, 
but steady degree of popularity which ever proves the 
most solid and durable — healthy, not hysterical — 
constant, not convulsive. 

Notwithstanding Mr. Horsfall's multifarious com- 
mercial engagements, he is ever to be found actively 
and usefully employed in various religious and chari- 
table affairs; possessing a mind of great capability, 
he is often chosen to preside in committees, and as 
chairman of congregated assemblies ; nor is his ability 
greater than is at all times his readiness to render 
the community essential service. These remarks 
are, however, more applicable to the history of Liver- 
pool than to that of Everton, although in times of 
need Mr. Horsfall is always disposed to aid, help, and 
beneficially advance the affairs of the latter township. 

Very recently, Mr. Horsfall has been elected to fill 
the office of a common-council-man of Liverpool, a 
selection that meets and satisfies the wishes of the 
burgesses at large ; and it is very probable that he 
will be shortly called upon to perform the duties of 
the chief magistrate of that town. 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 259 

Locality 15, r, is also the property of Mr. Horsfall; 
adjoining to which, on the north, is locality 12, a, out 
of which Mrs. Potter (the sister of the late J. Living- 
stone, Esq.) has formed two charming villas, and at 
their east fronts she has caused two handsome, com- 
modious mansions to he erected, at the southernmost 
of which Mrs. Potter herself resides, together with her 
son, William Potter, Esq., a merchant and insurance 
broker of Liverpool, a gentleman much respected and 
esteemed for his sauvity of manners, and undeviating 
integrity. 

Reverting again to the formation of a road in this 
quarter, a very eligible line of communication might 
be formed, immediately on the north of Mrs. Potter's 
premises, to connect Netherfield-road north with the 
great north road — a street constructed at this place 
would form a clear and distinct boundary between 
the lands of Everton and Kirkdale. As to all the 
other boundaries or junctions of those townships in 
this quarter, they are already clearly distinguished 
by certain roads which skirt or fringe these particular 
boundary lines, in their whole length northward to 
the quarry, and again eastward to just past the free 
school in Everton valley. 

It now only remains to treat of the south-west parts 
of the west district of Everton, there being nothing 
but hedgerows on the west border of that district, from 
Mrs. Potter's land to the west end of Bostock-street, 
and a continuation of hedgerows run southwardly from 
Bostock-street to within a few yards of the east end 



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260 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

of Dryden-street, where clusters on clusters of domi- 
ciles are built and building ; indeed, so numerous and 
dense are the habitations of this neighbourhood, that 
it would be in vain to attempt a description of them, 
or even concisely to touch on the biography of their 
inmates. The constant and rapid changes which are 
occurring here, would only permit description to pos- 
sess an ephemeral character of truth and consistency; 
for changes are constantly taking place, and house 
after house is incessantly rearing up its ' burnt-clay 
front, and the lands are annually intersected with new 
streets, which are not long laid out ere they are flanked 
with snug and handsome, though not large domiciles, 
of which there are few that are not inhabited ere the 
plaster becomes dry: the place is already teeming 
with population, and coquetting, as it were, -with its 
opulent neighbour; nay, the union is already formed — 
the indissoluble knot is tied that makes Everton Liver- 
pool's bride. In the Appendix will be found the 
names of all the residents of this, and indeed of every 
district of Everton, their avocations, the size and 
tenures of their dwellings, &c. &c. But there is one 
individual who resides in this quarter, of whom some 
mention must be made here, for he is the proprietor 
of extensive parcels of land in the neighbourhood, 
some of which lie at the east end of Great Nelson- 
street, but the major parts are situated a little on the 
west of Everton, in Liverpool, and more particularly 
in the vicinity of the church of St. Martin. 

Richard Houghton, Esq. is a common-council-man 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 261 

of Liverpool, and eldest son and heir to the late 
Edward Houghton, Esq., who erected the good and 
capacious mansion at the north-east corner of Great 
Nelson-street, and formed the villa that occupies the 
entire quarter of that street ; this villa has lost its 
rural character, for minor dwellings now surround it ; 
indeed it may be questioned if its original formation 
was a judicious undertaking, but it may, at any time, 
be easily converted into a commodious hotel. 

The late Edward Houghton, Esq. died at this villa, 
on the 24th February, 1820, aged 48 years ; since 
his demise, very much of the land which he left has 
been covered with buildings, and so highly has it been 
improved by the son in other ways, as to yield a 
manifold greater income than it was wont to do in the 
parent's day ; and as matters have latterly progressed, 
the present Mr. Houghton bids fair to become ex- 
tremely opulent. 

NORTH-WEST DISTRICT. 

The north-west district of Everton is bounded on 
the west by Netherfield-road north and the lands of 
Kirkdale; on the south by Priory -lane and Hill- 
side ; on the east also by part of Hill-side, St. Do- 
mingo-lane, and Church-street ; and on the north by 
Everton valley. This district, which was waste land 
much less than 100 years ago, is now, and for some 
time past has been, undergoing great changes in its 
external appearance, and bids fair soon to be, both in 



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262 HISTORY OF EVKRTON. 

value and beauty, equal, or but little inferior, to any 
other district in the township. 

The two northernmost localities in this quarter, 33, 
a, and 37, a y were green fields in the year 1790; but 
now much of the surface of their soil, particularly 
that of the latter locality, is nearly covered with 
buildings, or converted into gardens, pleasure-grounds, 
cattle-pens, water works, &c. 

This part of Everton rises gradually from the village 
of Kirkdale, sheltering it from the ill effects of bleak 
east winds, and fostering the fertile, prolific properties of 
the rich soil of that township ; which, indeed, it would 
almost seem has drained from Everton some of those 
fat and fertile qualities, which it probably may have 
possessed in by-gone ages. On locality 33, a, at the 
extreme north-west angle or corner of this district, 
some cattle-pens are constructed, which form part of a 
celebrated fair or market that has been long held 
here ; at first once a fortnight, afterwards weekly, and 
latterly twice a week, under the name of the " Kirk- 
dale Cattle-fair." To this place graziers, cattle- 
dealers, and butchers constantly resort, from all parts 
of this and the neighbouring counties : it is a mart 
where business in beasts is done to an amazing extent ; 
in proof of which the following statement is given of 
the importation of cattle into Liverpool during the 
year 1828, nearly the whole of which was disposed of 
at Kirkdale cattle-mart, together with many that may 
have, been brought to that market from inland parts 
during the same year. 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 263 

Imported- into Liverpool during the year 1828 : 
59375 Head of black cattle, which may be 

taken at the supposed value of £16 each £950,000 

128788 „ of Sheep 35s. 225,379 

115743 „ ofPigs 40s. 231,486 

640 „ of Horses £25. 16,000 

338 „ of Mules......... £8. 2,-704 

721 „ ofCalves £3. 2,163 

1300 „ ofLambs 18s. 1,224 

£1,428,956 
The following table shews the consumption of but- 
chers' meat in Liverpool in the year 1822 : 

Butchered in Liverpool, 1822 — Neat Cattle 13,963 

Calves 18,069 

Sheep and Lambs 86,730 

At present there are only two butchers in Everton, 
on any scale worthy of note, the one on Everton- 
brow, near- the bridewell, and the other at the east end 
of Virgil-street. 

The Kirkdale cattle fairs, or markets, are held 
regularly twice a week, on Mondays and Wednesdays; 
but Mondays are the principal days, on which much 
business is done : formerly the fair was held only on 
every other Monday, and was then called the " Kirk- 
dale Fortnight Fair." 

On any of its Monday market days, this place would 
aiford to the investigator of human nature a high 
treat; but from the nature of its transactions, none 
other than the male sex resort to this scene, where, 
perhaps, stibtilty and overreaching, together with much 
honest traffic and baiter, are carried to their highest 



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264 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

permitted points. Many sallow and squalid, scantily 
fed and slenderly clad persons may be seen on these 
days crowded together ; and not a few that are red, 
rosy, and robust, and attired in garments which the 
most opulent in the land would not be ashamed to 
wear : there are as many grades of beauty and de- 
formity in the men who resort to this fail*, as there are 
in the cattle exhibited there. This is said of the 
outward man, but who can read, or who can depict 
the inward man — his thoughts, his hopes, and his 
aims ? See how earnestly the seller recommends his 
cattle, and how carelessly the buyer seems to examine 
them; the owner labours to diminish their defects, 
whilst the would-be-purchaser roundly denounces 
them, talks of blemishes and faults which none but 
himself can discover, and even decries, or affects to 
despise, their beauty, advantages, and real value ; 
with what a careless air he carries himself, while in 
his heart he longs to bring an affair of some hundreds, 
or even thousands, in amount, to a termination. The 
chapman bids low, and watches the seller's reception 
of his offer ; in a moment his tact discovers if he must 
raise his bidding, or, by firmly adhering to his original 
offer, have only to wait such a reasonable time as the 
seller may deem necessary to support the character of 
a fair dealer. Look at the side glances the bidder casts 
at the dealer, who stands ruminating on the propriety, 
and probable advantage, of accepting or refusing the 
offer ; when their occasional glances meet, how instan- 
taneously they avert their eyes, each fancying that 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 265 

the detection of their lingering look has cast away- 
some pounds which, they hoped, by a magical sort of 
anticipation, had been as good as clear gain. 

But when at length the bargain is concluded, observe 
the self-complacency of the buyer, as he drives away 
what he conceives to be a profitable operation of trade; 
and then note the seller, how he ruminates, weighing 
the gold, in his hand, with the endeavour to carry- 
conviction to his half-dubious mind, that value for 
value has been received* See many a Mowing seller, 
who closely buttons up his pouch, and then turning to 
a comrade, or perhaps a co-partner, with a leer or 
significant sign, pronounces a not-to-be-mistaken com- 
mentary on his own ability, and his dupe's rarvism. 
In fine, at Kirkdale fair, such things as these, together 
with a multitude of other lessons equally interesting, 
will instruct and reward the observer for any attention 
and time he may spend on the occasion.* 

Nearly adjoining the cattle-pens, on the south, and 
situated in Everton, is a stone quarry, the property 
(as indeed is the greater part of this locality, 33, a,) 
of John Shaw Leigh, Esq., who lets it to be wrought 
on lease, or agreement. The stone procured from 
this quarry is generally found to be of a somewhat 
lighter cast than that which is usually met with at 
Everton ; in some parts, indeed, it inclines to a grey 
colour, but as the workmen advance to the east, its 

* There has been a disposition of late to fix a cattle fair on the south- 
east of Liverpool, near the Old Swan ; but some difficulties have arisen, 
and the plan, it is said, is for the present abandoned. 



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266 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

colour and character become similar to that of the 
interior parts of Everton, and such as is found about 
the site of the old beacon, of which the church of St. 
George is built. It is remarked of the stone procured 
at this north quarry of Everton that, after exposure, 
it suffers the elements very early to cover and encrust 
its exterior surface with a thin mossy coat; it also 
abounds with small flinty pebbles, which are very 
frequently studded and embedded in the solid or free- 
stone parts. 

Singular as it may seem, it is nevertheless a fact, 
that the township of Kirkdale has established its 
bridewell in this quarry, and actually within the town- 
ship of Everton. Why the Kirkdaleites have thrust 
this necessary evil into Everton's bosom, or why the 
Evertonians permit it to remain in their territory, is 
scarcely worthy of further inquiry or notice, excepting 
that, according to general custom and usage, Messrs. 
of the Kirkdale municipalty, ought to direct all 
rogues and vagabonds, caught at large within the 
limits of their jurisdiction, to be incarcerated in some 
stronghold within the bounds of their own township. 

It was hereabout where a pinfold was constructed, 
when the one was removed or destroyed which stood 
formerly in what is now called Rupert-lane. The 
walls of the pinfold, which had been constructed in 
Netherfield-road north, have been removed, and the 
site now forms part of that road; after the removal 
of the pinfold, however, the road remained broader 
than was requisite, and, in consequence, portions or 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 267 

slips of the broad space on the west were sold to Mr. 
Bailiff and to Mr. Farrer. On the site of a house 
now occupied by Mr. Dale, a publican, on the Kirk- 
dale side of the Everton valley, there stood anciently 
a noted public-house, called the Liver. 

There are a few dwellings on the east part of loca- 
lity 33, a, one of which is the property of Whittle, 

Esq., a very respectable solicitor of Liverpool; another 
of these little villas, is the property and residence of 
Mr. John Mc George — of whom more will be stated 
hereafter. An opening has been recently formed 
here, called John-street; its outlet or east end runs 
into St. Domingo-lane, at the north-west corner of 
which (with their fronts to Everton valley) are a few 
small houses ; and opposite to those houses, standing 
on what is termed " Waste land of Kirkdale," is the 
Everton and Kirkdale school ; on the front of which 
is the following inscription : 

* Everton and Kirkdale School. 

Erected MDCCCXVI. 

Enlarged MDCCCXXIL" 

This school was erected and established by donations, 
and is supported by annual subscriptions. 

In the year 1790 the locality 33, a, was the pro- 
perty of the late John Leigh, Esq., a gentleman of 
sound and acute judgment, who long stood high on 
the list of Liverpool's most respectable solicitors, and to 
whose heirs the chief part of this lot still belongs. 
The late Mr. Leigh purchased all the higher eccle- 
siastical profits and advantages accruing from the 



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268 HISTORY OF EVEHTON. 

parish of Walton ; and made extensive purchases of 
land in and near the north parts of Liverpool, not 
remote from the west borders of Everton. These 
bold and extensive speculations are now amply re- 
warding his family. 

In the locality 37, a, a broad, spacious street has 
been constructed, named Devonshire-place; many 
houses are built on both sides of it, but are wanting 
in uniformity ; some are scarcely above the degree of 
a cottage, many are good moderate-sized dwellings, 
and a few may be classed as commodious mansions ; 
most of the residences here are calculated for the re- 
ception of respectable and genteel families, each house 
having its pretty garden attached, and some are em- 
bellished with well-kept pleasure grounds ; but, as in 
other parts of Everton, the population is too dense 
to allow of biographical notices being even briefly 
taken. 

The Bootle water-company a few years ago con- 
structed a capacious water-tank, or reservoir, on the 
north side of Devonshire-place, a measure that has 
much advantaged the inhabitants of the township, for 
until latterly, notwithstanding Everton's many beau- 
ties, and other more solid advantages, the whole town- 
ship laboured under the inconvenience of not possessing 
within itself a supply of that particular and necessary, 
description of water, styled in vulgar parlance "soft:" 
nor is the Bootle water quite equal in that respect to 
rain water, but it is pellucid and salubrious, mode-' 
rately soft, and certainly partakes more highly of the 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 269 

latter quality than any spring water that can be ob- 
tained in Everton. 

Proceeding along Netherfield-road north, to the 
south of the quarry, after crossing Devonshire-place, 
the handsome residence of Mr. William Tatlock is the 
first arrived at, seated at the south-west corner of loca- 
lity 37, a. This little villa is charmingly situated, and 
in the year 1812, Mr. Tatlock, who was a master- 
cooper of Liverpool, built a good house on its west 
front, and then retired from the cares of business to 
this delightful abode, to enjoy in moderation the bless- 
ings of competence. He also patriotically caused a 
bench, or resting place, to be erected or formed in the 
bank or cop which borders the east side of Nether- 
field-road, about a hundred paces on the south of his 
own dwelling. On this bench many loungers, and 
often many lovers, delightedly sit, and linger to view 
the moving marine panorama that lies before them 
in the west. At the front part of this bench is in- 
scribed " Head Quarters," the meaning of which must 
be left to Mr. Tatlock' s interpretation. 

It may not be amiss to tarry a moment here, and 
give a faint delineation of the beautiful and interesting 
prospects that meet the observer's eye, when its glances 
are directed from this quarter; from hence is had 
a commanding view of a wide expanse of the Irish 
sea ; of the estuary of the Mersey j and of that river's 
course for two or three miles upward, from its junction 
with the waters of Bootle's spacious bay ; for, as yet, 
no clusters of dwellings are erected on the lands imme- 



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270 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

diately on the west of this northern part of the crest of 
Everton-hill : from this northern part, covered nearly 
the entire year with rich verdure, the fertile lands of 
Kirkdale gradually slope, until they join the level land 
that extends to the east hank of the Mersey, affording 
to the observer, in the same glance, a pastoral scene, 
and a grand and highly interesting marine picture, 
alive with the operations of both nature and art ; for 
the tides of the Mersey are ever on the ebb or flow, 
and Liverpool's gigantic commerce seldom spares, for 
one moment, the sendees of those mighty and bene- 
ficial fluxes of the great waters. On the right, the 
comfortable crow-nest village of Kirkdale pleases the 
eye, which, on turning its glance a little more north- 
wardly, is struck with the magnificent appearance of 
crimes' citadel — the House of Correction ; but leaving 
that "necessary evil," and looking near to the ob- 
server's station in the west, there will be constantly 
seen innumerable vehicles and passengers traversing 
the great north road to and from Liverpool. If the 
observer would extend his view, let him raise his eye- 
lid and take in the Cheshire lands, where villa after 
villa is now formed and forming, in rapid succession ; 
and further in the distance, bounding the prospect, 
are the projecting head-lands and stupendous moun- 
tains of Wales, Nor are the newly-erected fort and 
lighthouse the least interesting objects to be seen from 
Everton's northern parts; in these objects there is 
something pleasingly striking — the sombre, solid, dark 
and strong appearance of the battery, contrasts well 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 271 

with the light, white, airy and sail-like figure of the 
lighthouse. There is also something truly consolatory 
in reflecting on the purposes for which those structures 
were placed so conspicuously before us — the one to 
serve and save our friends, and the other to protect us 
from our enemies. It were vain, however, to carry 
description further; indeed, any delineation which 
can be given will prove but faint, and fall very far 
short of the reality ; for a just knowledge, and a pro- 
per appreciation, of the delightful prospects to be had 
from this quarter of Everton, can oidy be obtained 
from actual personal observation. 

The locality 41, a, was, in the year 1790, the pro- 
perty of a family named Fletcher, and remained in its 
possession until about two yeiars ago, when it was 
purchased by James Atherton, Esq., who resides at 
an extensive and beautiful villa, a few hundred yards 
distant, in the south, from this locality, near, and 
exactly opposite, on the w r est, to the church of St. 
George. Mr. Atherton is proprietor of a great part 
of the lands of the N. W. district, which quarter is 
highly indebted to him for the erection and formation 
of several handsome mansions, and delightful villas, 
and for highly embellishing and improving this part 
of the township in many other respects: he gave 
the greater part of the land that forms the site of the 
church of St. George, and its cemetery; a gift that 
materially benefits and accommodates the community, 
for previous to the erection of this church at Everton, 
there was no place of public worship nearer than 



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272 HISTORY OF EVERTON? 

Walton parish church, on the north, and the church 
of St. Anne, in Liverpool, on the west. The gift was 
a worthy one, and, doubtless, meets its reward in Mr. 
Atherton's conscious reflections of having promoted 
so laudable a measure, and eventually will meet with 
temporal reward, in enhancing the value of lands in 
the church's vicinity. But this brief notice of Mr. 
Atherton must not suffice — his is not an every day 
character — he is a man of ten thousand j and it may 
be truly said of him that he was "born to be busy." 
Moulded in a symmetrical frame, possessing a pre- 
possessing person, of good or rather commanding 
address, of an apparently hale constitution, and gifted 
with a strong, intelligent mind, it may be assumed, 
nay, it must be granted, that Mr, Atherton's capa- 
bilities are of no common cast : he courts enterprise, 
and rises superior to those vexations and crosses, 
which would dishearten and absolutely overwhelm the 
minds not only of the chicken-hearted, but even of 
those that are accounted to possess a tolerable share 
of fortitude. Mr. Atherton has the science of finance 
at his fingers' end; he can use a hundred pounds 
more economically, and make it turn the wheel of 
business with more alacrity, than yom* ordinary, cau- 
tious, hesitating men of trade can effect with a thousand 
pounds. Whilst engaged in the commerce of Liver- 
pool, or, as at one time it might be said, of the world, 
he did not fetter himself with the fears and doubts of 
the timid, and was often successful. In the storm's 
that did occasionally occur on the ocean of trade in 



• 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 273 

his days, he invariably managed to pilot his bark 
along the shores of commerce with a masterly hand ; • 
sometimes in ballast-trim only, and sometimes richly 
laden, but always in safety. At length, however, he 
discontinued the mercantile life, and has confined 
himself for some time past to landed and architectural 
speculations, both in Liverpool and Everton, thereby 
giving employment to a mind which cannot submit to 
a state of inactivity. The united and congregated 
exertions of a score of such men, could at any time 
convert an insignificant village into a town of conse- 
quence and renown ; in fine, Mr. Atherton is not only 
a man of ten thousand, but of a million. A newly- 
laid-out street now intersects this locality, (41, a,) 
from east to west, and a handsome pile of buildings 
is in course of erection at its west end, to be called 
Albion Crescent. 

On the south of a field belonging to the heirs of the. 
late Rev. J. Tatlock, (12, e,) dwells Mr. James Holmes, 
another of the lords of Everton's soil, who, in and 
about the year 1813, erected the, excellent houses at 
which S. B. Wild, William Jackson, and Samuel C. 
Stiles, Esqrs. reside, and also the one at which Mr. 
Holmes himself dwells. These are all charming 
places of residence, standing on the west part of loca- 
lity 2, Jc 9 the whole of which w T as, in the year 1 790, 
the property of the late John Sparling, Esq., and the 
west part of it has passed through the possession of 
James Atherton, Esq. to Mr. Holmes. Mr. Atherton, 
in the year 1828, erected several very good houses 

T 



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.274 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

on the south side of this locality, and on the east of 
Mr. Holmes' villas. 

Mr. Holmes is, in his way, a James the second, 
for indeed, in enterprise and activity, he is second to 
none in the township, save only his neighbour of the 
same christian name, of whom, in these pages, biogra- 
phical notice has been very recently taken ; but lat- 
terly another James of Everton (James Plnmpton, 
Esq.,) seems to be making great exertions to place 
himself architecturally on a par, or in rivalry, with his 
namesakes. Mr. Holmes has pushed industry to its 
utmost stretch ; he possesses a hale constitution, great 
physical strength, and a clear, strong, comprehensive 
knowledge of the business he is engaged in ; his argu- 
ments and his actions are substantial, proceeding at 
once to the object in view ; and in matters of his own 
craft, he is the very reverse of those who dress poor 
ideas and meagre measures in flimsy rhetoric and the 
mockery of logic : he came to Everton when a boy, 
about fifty years ago, and his attachment to the place 
has grown with his growth; in public matters he 
meddles very triflingly. 

At some little distance on the south of Mr. Holmes' 
property resides Mr. Robert Ledson, another deserv- 
ing son of industrious enterprise, who seems indefati- 
gable in two pursuits, — the one to give satisfaction to 
all for whom his assistants operate, and the other by 
active and honourable means to secure a competence 
for himself and family ; pursuits which seldom fail of 
success, if ardently and prudently followed. Of the 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 275 

two clusters of buildings of which Mr. Ledson's house 
forms the north wing, it may be sufficient to say, that 
they were chiefly, if not all, erected by builders, on 
speculation, within the last twenty years. These de- 
lightful places of residence are eight in number. John 
Boardman, Esq. resides at some few paces on the 
south of Mr. Ledson's villa, and is a merchant, exten- 
sively engaged in the wine and spirit trade, not only 
in Liverpool, but in the country far and w T ide. Were 
it not that Mr. Boardman extends his operations 
through -the winter, as well as incessantly during the 
summer, he might be most appropriately likened to 
the busy bee, ever on the wing, in search of the en- 
ticing honey of commerce — profit ; his attention and 
perseverance deserve that his hive should be abun- 
dantly stored. 

On the south-west corner of locality 8, a, is the 
villa of Colin Campbell, Esq., on which he has erected 
a spacious and commodious dwelling ; its original part 
(for it was constructed at two periods) was the first 
erected of the cluster of houses which now embellish 
this part of Everton. There is a quiet, pious, and 
moral bearing in the character of Mr. Campbell's 
family, highly deserving of notice and praise ; he is 
punctual and indefatigable in his commercial pursuits, 
a shunner of frivolity, a worthy member of both 
domestic and social life, and possesses a strong and 
fertile mind, in the proper cultivation of which, he 
takes much delight. The next villa on the south of 
Mr. Campbell's is that belonging to James Ackers, 



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276 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

Esq., a gentlemen whose biography will be found in 
the annals of Liverpool, at which place he has very 
frequently taken his station in the first and highest 
ranks of those engaged in political and parochial 
affairs. 

Some few yards south of Mr. Ackers' delightful 
villa, is a street, or rather a short opening, called 
Gloucester-place, in which, on a charming though 
somewhat retired spot, is formed the villa of Edward 
Lister, Esq., who has been long a denizen of Everton, 
pursuing a steady, respectable, prudent traffic in that 
article which has elevated Lancashire to its commer- 
cial character — cotton. Mr. Lister is in the enjoy- 
ment of a handsome competence, and possesses a 
domestic treasure, of which he may be justly proud ; 
doubtless, therefore, he finds in his elegant villa a 
delightful home. 

On the north side of Gloucester-place, opposite Mr. 
Lister s, is the villa of Thomas Ball, Esq., who is also 
the proprietor of that adjoining his own residence, on 
the south. *Mr. Ball has long, and to all appearance 
prosperously, carried on the spirit business in Liver- 
pool, To the discredit of the present epoch — or it may 
be to. the impossibility of preventing such evil occur- 
rences—it must be recorded, that a few weeks ago, 
at an early hour of the night, Mr. Ball was knocked 
down, maltreated, and robbed, in a comparatively 
public part of Everton. 

Adjoining the premises of Mr. Ball, on the south, 
resides Lieut. R. B. Boardman, R. N., at a very pretty, 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 277 

moderate sized villa, the property of the family; 
Although Mr. Boardman has married a very charm- 
ing Everton . lady, and, as it were, firmly planted 
himself in Everton' s garden, yet he must take deeper 
root in the township, ere he can put forth biographical 
blossoms for the annals of Everton. 

Some twenty paces on the south of Mr. Boardman's 
residence, stands an extensive and excellent mansion, 
erected in the year 1818, by the late Samuel Beeten- 
soii, M. D., of whom, it may be said, there were many 
ingredients in his character which tended to raise him 
to celebrity; but in his public career he always de- 
monstrated that fondness for minutiae which checks, if 
it does not counteract, otherwise able and useful 
efforts. As a medical practitioner, he was unques- 
tionably skilful, and possessed an excellent judgment : 
occasionally, and on emergencies, he practised profes- 
sionally; but after he took up his residence at Everton, 
he made no public avowal of being engaged in the 
healing art. The late Doctor Beetenson affords a 
demonstrative instance that Fate or Fortune does not 
always cast us into the trade, profession, or occupation 
best suited to our genius and ability; for had the 
Doctor, in early life, been trained to trade, it is pre- 
sumed, that he would have risen to the highest pitch 
of eminence as a merchant; he possessed the true 
tact of trade, and well understood the codes of com- 
merce, with all their nice and needful calculations; 
but he visited Liverpool at too late a period in life to 
put his commercial capabilities into operation on a 



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278 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

scale of magnitude ; the doctor died on the 28th 
May, 1823. 

On the south of the villa last noticed, which is the 
residence of William Shand, Esq., are three houses, 
erected in the year 1808, by the late Dr. Beetenson, 
and named by him Belle Vue ; at the northernmost 
of those dwellings this treatise was compiled. 

It may be urged that the pages of this work are 
strewed with laudatory flowers, plucked and selected 
from the best and brightest branches of the characters 
of individuals — what then ? no adulative or unworthy 
motives guide the pen ; the object in view is pure j 
the matter intrinsically just; and the aim is to shew 
that perseverance in laudable and industrious pursuits, 
and steadiness in the paths of piety and morality, are 
almost certain of obtaining worldly respect, and will 
brighten the prospect of a happy hereafter. It is 
hoped, then, that it may be permitted, for the sake of 
piety and morality, to clothe these biographical re- 
marks in their best and brightest garments, and, in 
imitation of able painters, skilfully to veil their ble- 
mishes and defects. But why name these ? there is 
not, perhaps, a community, of equal extent in number, 
which can boast of greater general, or of greater indi- 
vidual, purity of conduct, than can the highly respect- 
able one of Everton : as to perfection, no mortal will 
ever have the task to write the history of a perfect 
community. 

At the south point, or extremity of the north-west 
district, is a delightful villa, on which stands an 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 279 

elegant, spacious mansion, erected by the late Joseph 
Brooks, Esq., father of the Rev. Jonathan Brooks, of 
whom mention has been already made. 

In the early and middle stages of his life, the late 
Joseph Brooks, Esq., was an active and a highly 
useful member of society ; he was able and intelligent; 
and frequently came forward to render the township 
of Everton essential service; he was one of those 
settlers, already alluded to/ who, being more enlight- 
ened than were Everton's quondam nobles, introduced 
many vigorous and beneficial measures into the 
administration of its affairs. The late Mr. Brooks 
might be placed mid-way between the old and the 
new school of manners ; with enough of the genteel, 
yet formal bearing of the ancient, there was blended 
in his carriage and demeanor much of the ease and 
approach to elegance of the modern ; in his personal 
appearance there was that which stamped and declared 
him to be of patrician rank : he was a deputy-lieu- 
tenant and magistrate of the county, and likewise a 
member of the body corporate of Liverpool ; he died 
on the 3d August, 1823. This villa is now the pro- 
perty of the heirs of the late Alexander Mc Gregor, 
Esq., late chief director of the branch bank established 
at Manchester by the directors of the bank of Eng- 
land. Mr. Mc Gregor resided for many years at this 
villa, which, before his time, had been long the pro- 
perty and residence of Samuel Newton, Esq. 

With its east front to Hill-side, adjoining, on the 
north, to the last-named villa, is locality 4, a, a most 



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280 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

delightful and highly valuable patch of land, the pro- 
perty of William Earle, Esq. This is a desirable 
place on which to form one or more villas ; it has two 
extensive fronts, one to Hill-side, and the other to 
Netherfield-road north ; it also commands most charm- 
ing and extensive prospects. . 

In Lodge-lane, adjoining Mr. Earle's valuable lot, 
in the north, is a handsome dwelling and appropriate 
grounds, which were occupied, a few months ago, by 
the owner, Alexander Forrest, Esq., a solicitor of 
long and respectable standing, in Liverpool. Mr. 
Forrest duly appreciated the charms and comforts of 
this villa ; but the medical men prescribed a milder 
air, in consequence of which, he is trying the bland 
climate of Wavertree. 

. The township of Everton is much indebted to Mr. 
Forrest, for many useful gratuitous services, during a 
series of successive years : he was always punctually 
at his post at most municipal meetings, and prompt 
and active in aiding and furthering public business, 
in the tactics and etiquette of which he was well 
versed. Together with some other worthy indivi- 
duals of Everton, Mr. Forrest might be justly deemed 
the prototype of unpaid magistracy. 
- Some forty yards on the north of Mr. Forrest's 
villa, resides the next of Everton's lords of the soil, 
Edward Ledward, Esq., at a spacious and commodious 
mansion which stands on the east side of a very charm- 
ing villa, formed, or rather commenced, some twenty 
years ago by the late Thomas Wiatt, Esq. ; on the 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 281 

death of which gentleman it was sold to Thomas 
Hughes, Esq., solicitor, of Liverpool, who finished the 
architectural operations commenced by Mr. Wiatt. 
This villa is agreeably seated in the heart of a highly 
respectable neighbourhood, and in respect to charm- 
ing prospects, pure air, and what may be termed 
genteel-rurality of character, is second to none in the 
township. Mr. Ledward (in co-partnery with his very 
worthy brother, late of Roscommon-street, Everton,) 
is an extensive hat manufacturer, of Liverpool : he is 
hospitable and cheerful, and seems to be travelling 
through life as only on a pleasurable excursion. 

At some short distance on the north of Mr. Led- 
ward's villa dwells Joseph Hornby, Esq., at a mansion 
erected a few years ago by James Atherton, Esq. 
Mr. Hornby is a merchant of Liverpool, entitled by 
his consanguine and matrimonial connexions to class 
high in the aristocratic ranks of the county; time, 
however, must supply the future annalist with more 
extensive data than, it is candidly acknowledged, are 
in the possession of the compiler of these annals. 

On the north of Mr. Hornby resides James Atherton, 
Esq., at a villa which, for many successive years last 
past, he has been embellishing and improving; he 
seems to be forming villa after villa in his immediate 
neighbourhood, in an elegant style, and on a higlily 
respectable scale ; the villas recently formed by Mr. 
Atherton, called "Grecian Terrace," as a cluster of 
domiciles, have no rival at Everton ; there is, indeed, 



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282 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

an air of neatness anH finish about them, that is both 
pleasing and novel. 

On the east side of Lodge-lane, opposite to Mr, 
Atherton's residence, stands the church of St. George, 
which, until very recently, was the only church in the 
township of Everton ; nor is there any written or oral 
tradition extant to warrant even a supposition that, 
previous to this erection, there ever was a church at 
Everton, which stood on consecrated ground. 

In the year 1813 a few respectable individuals 
raised the sum of £11,500, in subscription shares of 
£100 each, for the purpose of erecting, and with the 
money so raised they did erect, the present church of 
St. George, which now very nearly occupies the site 
of land whereon had stood for many centuries a fire 
beacon, the last remaining relique of antiquity in the 
township, the ancient cross excepted: the church 
indeed covers more ground than that on which the 
ancient beacon stood, and the holy structure, together 
with its cemetery, extend westwardly considerably 
beyond the limits of any land that tradition speaks of 
as having been allotted to the beacon. The chancel 
of the church, in which is a splendid window of stained 
glass, is placed very near to where the old beacon 
stood. 

There could scarcely have been selected a more 
eligible spot on which to erect this holy fabric, which, 
standing in the north quarter of the township, affords 
to that now grown populous part of Everton great 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 283 

accommodation in the performance of their religious 
duties; and offers similar facilities and advantages 
to the people of Kirkdale and other adjacent places. 
The church of St. George, in Everton, is a handsome, 
pleasing specimen of architectural taste; it is in a 
great measure of the gothic order; and though its 
construction is strong in effect, yet its appearance is 
ornamentally light; it is a pleasing and conspicuous 
feature in the scene, from whatever station it may 
be viewed; and if any one who delights in grand 
and charming prospects would wish amply to gratify 
himself, let him ascend the steeple of this church on 
an unclouded day, from whence, at an elevation of 
about ninety feet from the ground, he will be gra- 
tified with most interesting, picturesque, and beautiful 
scenery, in whatever direction he shall please to cast 
his eyes. 

The first stone of this edifice was laid on the 19th 
April, 1813, and on the 30th October, 1814, was 
opened for the public performance of divine worship ; 
having been consecrated by the bishop of Chester on 
the 26th October, of the same year. To this church 
is attached an extensive and admirably adapted 
cemetery ; the thin coat of light dry soil which lies 
on its surface has a substratum of solid rock, where 
deep, secure, and dry vaults are constructed, by the 
pick-axe only, without absolutely requiring the mason 
or the bricklayer's exertions. In forming a path on 
the surface of this cemetery, on the south side of the 
church, two skeletons were dug up ; whose they were 



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284 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

is, of course, uncertain ; but it may be presumed that 
they were two of Prince Rupert's soldiers, for war 
has many casualties, and many soldiers are uncere- 
moniously interred in unconsecrated ground ; — or it 
might be that they belonged to some unfortunate 
beings who were" villainously and violently deprived 
of life. 

In the Appendix will be found some extracts from 
the act of parliament by virtue of which this church 
was erected, and other matter touching the affairs of 
this holy edifice. 

To make a transition from the church to the 
minister, is as natural as it is hoped will be con- 
sidered proper and consistent. A truly pious and 
exemplary minister of the established church, the 
Rev. Robert Pedder Buddicom, A.M., F.A.S., is the 
present and first chosen chaplain of the church of 
St. George, in Evertbn ; the conduct, character, and 
talent of the reverend gentleman need no record in 
these pages ; his flock is numerous, principally com- 
posed of persons of intelligence and respectability; 
but all his hearers, high and low, rich and poor, 
elevated and humble, reverence, esteem, and admire 
their spiritual shepherd. 

The Rev. Mr. Buddicom resides at a handsome 
villa, in Lodge-lane, which is his own property, and 
stands at a very convenient distance from the holy 
edifice, being only a few hundred yards in the south 
from the west entrance gates of the church \ over all 
the appointed duties there performed, the reverend 



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ST. GEORGE'S CHURCH, EVERTON. 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 287 

gentleman is piously to preside, until it may please 
the All-wise Master whom he serves to call him to 
the joys of " another and a better world." 

It is a too generally received opinion, that a public- 
house is a necessary appendage to a church ; but to 
attempt to Refute such an opinion, would be calling 
in question the intelligence and good taste of the 
reader, therefore only the facts connected with the 
case in question will be stated. 

Adjoining to the cemetery of St. George, on the 
south, in Church-street, and coeval with the church 
itself, stands a very spacious brick edifice, erected by 
James Atherton, Esq., which was first occupied by a 
Mr. Joseph Dale, a licensed victualler, and opened 
to the public under the title of St. George's Hotel; 
there was a bowling-green attached to this hotel, on 
the west, as were also very extensive stable offices 
and other commodious outbuildings ; its south wing 
contained two good billiard tables ; there was also a 
roomy tap, or place for the reception and accom- 
modation of the lower order of customers. Mr. Dale 
kept the house open a few years, and in the year 
1818 was succeeded in the direction and management 
of the establishment by a Mr. John Arundell. 

Owing to the want of good management on the 
part of the innkeepers, or to the lack of what a 
miller would call grist, the undertaking failed, and 
in the year 1822 the hotel establishment was broken 
up ; the house itself was converted into a respectable 
seminary, and the bowling-green into a pleasure or 



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288 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

play ground for the pupils. The tap-room (which is* 
a detached building on the south) has, however, con- 
tinued to be licensed, and is still a public-house, kept 
by Mr. Robert Parry, who is a very striving, civil, 
pains-taking person. 

The academy now established at the ci-devant 
hotel of St. George, is conducted by Mr. Thomas 
Harris, on whom public rumour bestows praise, as the 
desert both of private conduct and the judicious 
management of his seminary ; it is a treat to see the 
healthy and neat appearance of the youths of this 
school, as, in orderly rank and file, they proceed on 
Sabbath-days to and from one of the churches of 
Liverpool. The place is admirably adapted for its 
present purpose; the play-ground is a treasure to 
the pupils during their leisure hours, where they 
inhale, in the very essence of their purity, the breezes 
which at most seasons of the year progress^ from the 
sea to the interior. > 

In the year 1804, very near, if not precisely on, 
the site of the before-named tap-room, government 
was permitted, by James Atherton, Esq., to establish 
a signal station, which was long under the super- 
intendence and command of the late Lieut. James 
Watson, R.N. This gentleman took great pride and 
pleasure in keeping in the neatest order a beautiful 
little garden, that lay on the south, and close before 
the door of the cottage, which was constructed of wood, 
and stood at the north end of the station. The cottage 
was a snug place of abode, constructed and fitted 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 289 

up in a cabin-like, sailor's way, and the whole place 
was perfectly adequate to the comfortable accommo- * 
dation of the commander-in-chief of the station, and 
Some two or three assistants, who were usually super- 
annuated seamen. 

Mr. Watson was highly esteemed, and his excel- 
lent demeanor introduced him into the highest 
circle of Everton' s society. It was with unfeigned 
regret his friends heard that he had somewhat sud- 
denly departed this life, very soon after the arrival of 
the angel of peace in our then long war-afflicted 
land; the latter event caused the signal establishment 
at Everton to be broken up. Mr. Watson died 30th 
July, 1815. 

At this station a telegraph was constructed, which 
communicated with other stations, particularly with 
one on Bidston-hill, in Cheshire, and through it with 
others more in the west ; but happily no attempt was 
made by the enemy, so as to give those excellent pre- 
cautionary, or premonitory, establishments the employ- 
ment for which they were originally chiefly intended. 
It Avas about a year after the termination of the late 
war, that the whole of the Everton signal station was 
broken up — the snug cabin, the neat garden, the 
telegraph, and all their appurtenances and appliances, 
being then utterly demolished and swept away. 

There is a cluster of some four dwellings, with 
gardens in their rear, in a continuous line with the 
tap-room, on the south, in Church-street. 

At the south-east angle of the north-west district 

u 



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290 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

of Everton, is locality 2, p, whose south front forms 
the entire north horder of Priory-lane. In the year 
1790, this place was a field, yielding only very scanty 
herbage, and then presenting no appearance worthy 
of a second glance : but now the observer's eye may 
long delightedly look on its altered appearance, being 
converted into one of Everton' s most charming villas. 
The mansion was erected by Mr, Henry Orme, an 
extensive brewer of Liverpool, upwards of twenty 
years ago, but many improvements have been made 
in the place since his time; it has been long the 
property, and is now in the occupancy, of Ormerod 
Heyworth, Esq., a merchant extensively engaged in 
the commerce of South America, and is as desirable 
a place of residence for persons necessitated daily to 
attend the business of a maritime port, and who yet 
desire to partake of the advantages of a delightful 
semi-^ural domicile, as can be any where found. 

The exterior of Mr. O. Heywood's villa has, how- 
ever, one blemish — a blemish, by-the-bye, too pre- 
valent in the township — the outermost of the fence- 
walls, in structure and materials, being only sufficiently 
decorous to fence in or enclose a patch of pasturage, 
or common field ; but such a villa as this is, should 
be murally enclosed with the finer kind of free-stone, 
constructed and chiseled with masonic taste and skill, 
in some such a style as that in which the west front of 
Mr. James Heyworth's villa is becomingly embellished 
and finished. 

Of all parts of Everton, the north-west district has 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 291 

undergone, if not the greatest, certainly the most ad- 
vantageous changes ; in the year 1 790, on its whole 
face, there was only one habitation, that of the late 
Joseph Brooks, Esq. : the greater part of this quarter 
then consisted of lands of low fertility ; some, indeed, 
were so sterile, as to afford but very scanty fare for 
the few cattle that were permitted to pick a mouthful 
where they could. Some of the localities of this 
quarter were thickly strewed with thistles, flea-nuts, 
and gorse bushes ; but now how altered ! the industry 
and wealth of man have studded this part of Everton 
with elegant mansions, beautiful pleasure-grounds, 
and productive gardens ; the few remaining pasture- 
lands have been highly improved with rich composts, 
and what is the greatest of all, in the scale of advan- 
tages, the place has become the happy abode of many 
honest men, excellent matrons, and bonny lasses. 

CENTRE DISTRICT. 

The centre district of Everton is bounded on the 
west by Hill-side and Netherfield-road south ; on the 
south by Everton village and Breck-lane; on the 
east by Hangfield-lane ; on the north by Mere-lane ; 
and again, on the west, for a short distance, by Church- 
street. The locality 22, e, in the year 1790, was 
little other than waste land, or a common in miniature, 
enclosed or separated from the road with a rude fence, 
consisting of piled-up earth, faced with sods, commonly 
called a bank. About twenty years ago this lot was 
divided into two parts, the northernmost or largest 



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292 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

of which was purchased, at the same time, by the late 
John Hind, Esq., a gentleman who had realised a 
handsome fortune as a shipbuilder at Liverpool. Very 
shortly after Mr. Hind had made this purchase, he 
began to construct a building which was originally 
intended to be a handsome imitation of the old beacon. 
Mr. Hind's beacon or tower, however, proving rather 
rickety, to secure it, he ran out a wing to the west, 
thereby giving an appearance to the place of a small 
church ; and some time afterwards he added another 
wing to the south, so that at length the building be- 
came what it is now, a non-descript in architecture : 
if, however, it must be classed, perhaps it would be 
most appropriate to style it of the whim-sic order. 
To make amends for the vagaries his taste had dis- 
played in constructing this mimic-beacon, Mr. Hind 
erected a truly elegant and commodious mansion on 
the south-west part of his land, and there he resided 
for some time — happily no doubt, for he was wont to 
style the place Elysium. It would almost seem as if 
the late Mr, Hind had been intended for something 
beyond what he ever attained — he was strongly dis- 
posed to be a director of public affairs ; it has been 
banteringly said of him, that he imitated. the borough- 
mongers, and with claret and strong beer got elected 
mock-mayor of Everton ; but it must in sincerity be 
acknowledged, that few persons of late times have 
taken greater interest in the township's concerns, or 
rendered Everton better service, than he did. Mr. 
Hind died in October, 1824. 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 293 

The smaller division of locality 22, e, was also 
bought about twenty years ago, by William Byrom, 
Esq., an architect, of high and long standing, at 
Liverpool, who erected an elegant villa on its west 
part, at which he resided for some time. When 
Mr. Byrom built his mansion, he fashioned it so that 
the chimney-tops were not visible ; passers by con- 
sidered this an incongruity, and ridiculed the plan 
accordingly ; therefore, to please the multitude, and 
to feast the eye of the fastidious, Mr. Byrom erected 
artificial chimney-tops,* thereby making the mansion, 
at least in the opinion of the architectural critics, a fit 
place of residence ; but with or without chimney- 
tops, there is not a mansion in the neighbourhood which 
surpasses it within for commodiousness, elegance, and 
neatness, and externally it is a beautiful bijou ; the 
grounds, it is true, are of limited extent, but there is 
an air of elegant respectability, a picturesque, pleasing 
appearance about the whole, that delights all who 
visit it. At considerable cost, it has latterly been 
much improved, and highly embellished. 

The bifold villa, which was formerly the property 
of the late Mr. Hind, has been purchased by G. F. 
Dickson, Esq., a most respectable merchant of Liver- 
pool, who also owns some other land on the east of the 
lot now under notice; and at the largest of the man- 
sions erected by Mr. Hind, Mr. Dickson has resided 
for some time past. 

The villa formed by Mr. Byrom is now the property 

■*Mr. Byrom afterwards raised other chimneys, after the usual fashion. 



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294 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

and residence of James Heyworth, Esq., the copartner 
of his brother and neighbour, O. Hey worth, Esq., 
gentlemen who are prominently active, and highly- 
conducive to the commerce, trade, and welfare of 
Liverpool, the rays of whose prosperity warm, cherish, 
and invigorate the growing grandeur, and encrease 
the value, of the township of Everton. 

Adjoining the villa of James Heyworth, Esq. on the 
south, is locality 7, a> which for more than a quarter of 
a century was the property and residence of the late 
John Drinkwater, Esq., whose excellent dwelling, 
standing on the east part of this lot, was erected soon 
after the year 1790, by the late William Clarke, Esq.; 
a banker of Liverpool, for the use and occupation of his 
mother. Mr. Drinkwater had the welfare and interest 
of the township much at heart, and about twenty-five 
years ago, took some pains to render it essential 
service ; he collected together, on a certain day, in the 
year 1804, the aged and the young, and had them 
led, under the guidance of the best informed persons, 
to examine into, and accurately take note of, the 
boundary lines, limits, or liberties of the township; 
he also personally convened and induced many of the 
principal proprietors of the soil to meet together, in the 
month of October of that year, to canvass and con- 
verse on the township's affairs, as Englishmen love to 
do, after a good dinner ; and he proposed and urged 
them to form a band of council and of friendship. 
At the first of their meetings, moderation and har- 
mony were the orders of the entire day; the hours 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 295 

were rationally spent, and each individual retired 
to his own happy home contented and satisfied. 
But, when time had perfected another year, a second 
meeting took place, purporting to have the same good 
objects in view; this meeting, however, was very 
dissimilar in character and consequences to that of 
the previous one; for a sumptuous feast was pro- 
vided, mimic authorities and mock civic-officers were • 
created, and those baubles and useless appendages of 
authority, called regalia, were introduced : the good- 
livers pampered their palates, and the votaries of 
Bacchus were not sparing in their devotions ; ceremo- 
nies, bordering on the ridiculous, were invented and 
practised, and cantators from the Liverpool Theatre 
catered to the sense of hearing, until satiety or in- 
ebriety summoned the drowsy worthies to their downy 
beds. What beneficial results could emanate from 
such meetings ? All these civic feasts were held at 
the coffee-house on the brow.* Mr. Drinkwater 
withdrew from such worshipful society, which survived 
but a few years, and died a natural death. With a 
constitution the reverse of robust, Mr. Drinkwater 
attained to a great age, by making use of two most 

* The following persons were mock-mayors of Everton : 

1805, E. Lorimer, 1811, Thomas Huson, 

1806, T. Tattersall, 1812, Edward Lister, 

1807, C. Horsfall, 1813, John Hind, 

1808, 1814, George Johnson, 

1809, John Greaves, 1815, John Pyke, 

1810, William Turner, 1816, J. Hornby, 

and ever after, the mayors of Everton have been returned "non est 
inventus." 



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296 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

excellent medicines — temperance and regularity ; 
blest with abundant competence, happy and con- 
tented, relying on his own intellectual resources, 
he calmly spent his evening of life, and, like the 
"man of Ross," often indulged his feelings with the 
luxury of unostentatiously doing good. Mr. Drink- 
water died on the 4th November, 1829, aged 82 
years. 

At the north-west corner of the late Mr. Drink- 
water's land, stood a stable erected by the late Joseph 
Brooks, Esq. This place, which measured only a 
few square yards, was purchased about six years ago 
by James Heyworth, Esq. for £300, in order to lay 
the site of land to his pleasure-grounds. Just without 
the south-west corner of Mr. Drinkwater's land stood 
a very ancient cottage, already noticed in the section 
of antiquities, which was taken down twenty-five 
years ago. The two localities next on the south to 
the late Mr. Drinkwater's are marked 40, c, and 27, 
d y and in the year 1790 were two small fields, but 
are now covered with large, commodious mansions, 
pleasure-grounds, and serviceable gardens. In the 
years 1802 — 3, Messrs. Aspinall, who were then 
grocers and bankers of Liverpool, erected on the west 
part of these localities several spacious and (internally 
at least) elegant dwellings ; the west fronts of which 
are constructed with free-stone procured on the spot, 
of that reddish, or chocolate coloured kind so plenti- 
fully met with at Everton. These edifices it is said 
cost much more than the projectors had estimated, 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 297 

and the Messrs. Aspinall sold the entire of them to 
Messrs. Fry, of London, who a few years ago disposed 
of them to various purchasers. 

The two northernmost of these desirable residences 
are now the property of George Batley, Esq., and 
the two dwellings next on the south of Mr. Batley' s 
belong to Miles Barton, Esq. ; both these gentlemen 
are most respectable brokers of Liverpool, and reside 
at the larger of the mansions, which stand on their 
respective premises. Of the others of these double 
mansions, the northernmost pair are the property of 
John Taylor, Esq., a merchant and insurance broker, 
of most respectable standing, at Liverpool ; and the 
southernmost pair are the property of Lewis Stubbs, 
Esq., of the house of Messrs. Ewart and Co., which 
ranks the first in the list of Liverpool brokerage- 
houses. Mr. Taylor occupies the entire of his bifold 
villa ; and that of Mr. Stubbs is also entirely in the 
tenancy of Miss Sharp, the conductress of a most 
respectable ladies' seminary. These buildings, in 
consequence of the dark colour of the stone, present 
a sombre appearance, but the durability and dryness 
of the stone amply compensate for the lack of external 
beauty. There are two excellent top-springs in this 
neighbourhood, one of which supplies, or did recently, 
some, if not all, of these houses with excellent water ; 
the other spring was exclusively the late Mr. Drink- 
water's, and is wrought through the agency of a pump 
in the garden : it is somewhat strange that these top- 
springs are rarely, met with at Everton except in this 



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298 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

quarter. There are two openings or passages running 
through the lands of the Aspinall villas, — -one at the 
extreme north, and the other in the centre ; both are, 
in the strictest sense, private property. 

The next locality on Everton-terrace, on the south 
of what are termed " Aspinall's buildings/' is 27, e, 
which, in the year 1790, was the property of the late 
James Carruthers, Esq., who died 17th July, 1815, 
aged 63 years. The house which then stood on this 
lot was built by a Mr. Johnson, a painter, of Liverpool, 
who, with twenty other persons, w T as drowned near 
the black rock, whilst on a marine excursion of plea- 
sure. The old house has been nearly, if not altogether, 
taken down, and on its site the present proprietor, 
Thomas Fumess Dyson, Esq., has erected an elegant 
mansion, and converted the place into a most delight- 
ful villa, particularly the east front, which, with its 
tasty, though limited, pleasure ground, may vie, as to 
beauty, with any other spot, far or near ; it is only to 
be regretted, that the taste which produced this effect 
had not a wider field for display. 

Mr. Dyson, who resides at this charming villa, is a 
merchant of the first class, in Liverpool, punctual, 
regular, and upright in commercial affairs; at all times, 
and on all occasions, of suave, gentlemanly deport- 
ment \ and every person with whom he comes in con- 
tact, whether in public or private, yields him respect 
and esteem. This locality was purchased by Mr. 
Dyson from the heirs of the late James Brade, Esq., 
who died at this villa in May, 1811. It is due to the 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 299 

memory of Mr. Brade to notice, that his mercantile 
skill and operations were of the very first order. His 
brother, the late highly respected William Brade, 
Esq., died at Everton, 13th April, 1820, aged 69 
years. 

Adjoining Mr. Dyson's property, on the south, is 
locality 39, a, which, in the year 1 790, was the pro- 
perty of Peter Hope, Esq. ; the house now standing 
on this lot was also erected by the afore-named Mr. 
Johnson, and is now the property and residence of 
Thomas Tattersall, Esq., one of the first class of 
Liverpool cotton-brokers. 

Considerable additions and improvements have been 
made to this villa, particularly during the time of the 
late Thomas Tattersall, Esq., who was the father of 
the present possessor. The senior Mr. Tattersall 
resided at this place for a quarter of a century, during 
which period he was always ready and willing to fur- 
ther the interests of the township ; he died on the 7 th 
March, 1819. 

There is not in existence, perhaps, a more down- 
right, off-hand person of business than the present 
Mr. Thomas Tattersall, who possesses a fund of plea- 
santness and good humour, which many vinegar- 
tempered gentlemen might advantageously study. 

Locality 27, a, with the road intervening, lies 
directly in front of the four last-named villas; this 
sloping field was purchased, more than twenty years 
ago, by four gentlemen, viz., Messrs. Lorimer, Tatter- 
sall, Brade, and Newton, who resided in the vicinity, 



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300 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

and who divided it into four equal portions or shares; 
it is said that these gentlemen purchased this lot 
to secure their own villas from annoyance, and to 
keep the prospect open to their fronts ; but on the 
southernmost portion seven very good dwellings were 
erected, about ten years ago, by the late Ellis Lorimer, 
Esq. ; these houses front Everton-terrace, where the 
widow of the late Mr. Lorimer resides. Mr. Lorimer 
was a wholesale grocer, of Liverpool, plain in his 
manners, upright in his transactions, punctual as the * 
clock in his payments, and a pattern to all in the 
steady attention he paid to his business. 

On the west of the last-named dwellings, with its 
front to Netherfield-road south, is locality 64, a, which, 
in the year 1790, was the property and residence of 
the late Mr. James Hatton, formerly a most respect- 
able stationer, of old Castle-street, Liverpool. This 
old-fashioned rural residence now belongs to the Lori- 
mer family, and has been occupied, for a dozen years 
or more, by conductors of seminaries — the barn and 
stables having been converted into a school-room, 
The school establishment was commenced by the late 
Rev. Mr. Hadfield, and continued by Mr. Esbie, but 
has very recently changed hands, and is now conducted • 
by Mr. Knowles, with able assistants. 

At the north-west corner of locality 64, a, is a deep 
well, with a good pump. These are public property, 
and open to the free use of the inhabitants of Everton: 
the pump has been put down at the township's expense, 
and the land, being 48 square yards, was purchased 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 301 

by the towiislrip from the late Mr. Joshua Rose, for 
the sum of twenty-one pounds, on the 16th April, 
1787; this gentleman had the first pump put. down, 
and also had the well sunk. 

Ascending again to the Terrace, the next locality is 
that marked 7, c, which, in the year 1790, was the 
property of the late William Clarke, Esq., the elder 
of that name, who was indeed a highly respected and 
truly worthy gentleman, a banker, of Liverpool, and 
father of the late John Clarke, Esq., banker, of that 
town. The elder Mr. Clarke erected the greater part 
of the spacious mansion which now stands nearly in 
the centre of this locality. 

William Clarke, Esq., the younger, resided for 
some time at this villa; but he sojourned occasionally 
in Italy, from whence, it is said, he brought many 
valuable MSS, touching the Medici family, together 
with many other matters highly valuable in the esti- 
mation of the painter and the poet, and useful to the 
scholar. After the demise of the younger W. Clarke, 
Esq., this villa, together with other adjacent property, 
was purchased by the late Nicholas Waterhouse, the 
elder, ' a member of the Society of Friends, whose 
character stood high in the consideration of that moral 
community. The late N. Waterhouse, the elder, was 
for many years, by common consent as it were, styled 
the chief or first of the cotton brokers of Liverpool ; he 
made considerable additions to, and greatly improved 
and embellished, the mansion of this villa ; he died the 
19th November, 1823. 



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302 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

The lane between this locality, 7, c, and that marked 
51, a, (which also belongs to the Waterhouse family) 
was first constructed and opened by the late "William 
Clarke, Esq., the elder, when he built his mansion. 
Ever since its first formation, pedestrians have had free 
passage through this road ; and even when a gate was 
placed at the east end of this lane, soon after Mr. 
Waterhouse made his purchase, a space was left open 
for the use and convenience of foot passengers : — the 
old inhabitants state, that this road has been open to 
the public for fifty years. The very worthy widow of 
the late Nicholas Waterhouse continues to reside at 
this delightful villa. 

The land immediately on the west of locality 7, c, 
is divided into two distinct lots, which, with the excep- 
tion of a reserved passage or road in the centre, sepa- 
rate the Waterhouse villa from the terrace ; the lot in 
the north-west quarter is marked 72, #, and was, in 
the year 1790, the property of a Mr. David Jones: 
there are two old dwellings on it, joined together- 
larger kind of cottages, but of no peculiar style, the 
property of Mrs. Waterhouse, and generally let to 
respectable people. At one of these houses the grand- 
parents of the Rev. Mr. Buddicom resided for some 
time. 

The lot on the south-west of Mrs. Waterhouse's 
premises is a charming villa, marked 69, a, formerly 
the property of the late James Parke, Esq., but now 
of his heirs, James Blundell, Esq., manufacturer of 
tobacco, at Liverpool, and others. Mr. Parke erected 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS, 303 

the house of this villa, where he dwelt a considerable 
time. 

Crossing the Terrace-road, immediately in front of 
the last-noticed villa, stands a humble-looking, but 
very comfortable, brick-built cottage, 69, b. It were 
wrong to pass this place altogether without notice, for 
at it there long dwelt a good and kind matron, one 
who has often attended and cherished, with care and 
tenderness, the sick, the infirm, the delicate of consti- 
tution, and the convalescent, and at all times admi- 
nistered to the comforts, wants, and conveniences of 
those who occasionally lodged under her roof. Such 
was the late Nurse Best, who died 23d November, 
1815; and her daughter, following the mother's ex- 
ample, still strives to make her residence a happy and 
comfortable home to its inmates : this place also be- 
longs to Mr. Blundell and others, the heirs of the late 
Mr. Parke. 

The localities 67, #, and 54, a, are now the 
property of John Higginson, Esq., a most respectable 
merchant of Liverpool, who is extensively engaged in 
trade, principally to Barbadoes. The house standing 
on the first-named part of Mr. Higginson's property 
was built by Mr. Samuel Alcock ; the broad-fronted 
mansion and range of buildings on the latter-named 
part of that gentleman's premises, were erected by a 
Mr. Rylance. This property presents, from the sea- 
board, perhaps the most conspicuous appearance of 
any object in Everton; from the platform, erected 
on the roof of the larger house, the view is com- 



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304 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

manding, and strikingly pleasing ; but in return, these 
houses (and indeed all dwellings hereabout) have 
frequently to endure the " pelting of the pitiless 
storm." 

For a great number of years the late Ellis Lorimer, 
Esq. resided at the south part of Mr. Higginson's 
now enlarged villa. In addition to what has already 
been stated of Mr. Lorimer, it may be said, that he 
was at all times disposed to aid and assist in the well 
regulating, directing, and governing Everton's muni- 
cipal affairs : he died at this villa, on the 20th July, 
1818, aged 63 years; and shortly after his demise the 
place was sold to Mr. Higginson, together with the 
principal part of the next noticed locality. 

Although locality 15, q, is separated from Mr. 
Higginson's residence by the Terrace-road, it may 
be deemed, notwithstanding, a sort* of lawn to his 
mansion; and the possession of the place is to him 
invaluable, since it puts it out of the power of others 
to obstruct his prospect westwardly, or in any other 
way to annoy him. The south part of locality 15, q, 
was* purchased about twenty years ago, by the late 
George Roach, Esq. 

On the south, adjoining Mr. Higginson's residence, 
is locality 59, a; this place has recently undergone 
material change : about nine years since two excel- 
lent houses were taken down, and, in the year 1820, 
a stately edifice was built on their sites. This loca- 
lity has been long the property of a Liverpool family, 
named Hope ; and at the spacious and elegant man- 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 305 

sion that now graces this villa, Samuel Hope, Esq., 
a banker, of Liverpool, resides, to whom the pro- 
perty now belongs. Of Mr. Samuel Hope, it may be 
said, that he ever seems to keep the example of the 
"good Samaritan" in view — to the poor and the un- 
educated he has been, and still continues to be, a fer- 
vent, active, and sincere friend. 

It is now eighteen years since the late George" 
Roach, Esq. purchased the south part of locality 15, q, 
and the north part of .50, a, for which he gave the 
then unprecedented price of 13s. per superficial square 
yard ; these purchases he laid together, and formed 
a beautiful villa, on which he erected a very exten- 
sive and commodious mansion — this villa, from the 
cost of its formation, might with propriety be called 
Potosi. 

The late Mr. Roach was a very respectable mer- 
chant of Liverpool, one of those British settlers, wha 
quitted Portugal when the king of that country re-> 
moved Iris court to Brazil : until very lately the family, 
of Mr. Roach continued to reside at this villa, but on 
the 11th May, 1829, it was sold to J. M. Cowgill,- 
Esq., for £4500 : * the formation and completion of 
it had cost Mr. Roach more than £10,000: this 
case verifies the adage, that " it is better to buy than 
to build." 

* In consequence of some restrictions, forbidding buildings to be erected 
on the west border of this villa, Mr. Cowgill declined the bargain ; the 
place has since been purchased by Samuel Hope, Esq., who, being the. 
owner of the adjoining property, has the power of removing or doing away 
with the restrictions altogether. 

X 



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306 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

Adjoining, on the south, the villa last-noticed, is, 
locality 50, a, which, in the year 1790, was the pro- 
perty and residence of the late Daniel Backhouse, 
Esq,, a gentleman who, for a long series of years, was 
most extensively engaged in the commerce of Liver- 
pool, and whose talent and application raised him to 
a high state of opulence and respect ; he will be long 
remembered for the pride and pleasure he took in per- 
forming the duties of hospitality. There are many 
individuals, of eminent note in the world, who are 
highly, if not altogether, indebted to the late Mr. 
Backhouse's patronage and support, for the wealth, 
the splendour, and the consideration they enjoy ; he 
was a true, permanent, and sincere patron. The old 
house still standing on this locality was built by a 
family of the name of Harrison, as was also the. house 
that stood at the opposite side of the Terrace-road, on 
the east; at this latter house, which was formerly 
called Cob-hall, the Harrisons resided. About two 
years ago Samuel Hope, Esq., bought locality 50, a,. 
and last year erected the handsome house which stands 
on the south of the old dwelling. 

Locality 50, 6, was also the property of the late D. 
Backhouse, Esq. ; this place lay on the east of 50, a ; 
the house, which had nothing either externally or 
internally to recommend it to notice, projected much 
into the Terrace-road, where it was inconveniently 
and dangerously narrow. In the year 1818, the re-, 
maining and greater part of locality 50, &, was sold 
to the township, and to Charles Shand, Esq. ; the old 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 307 

house which stood on the south was taken down, the 
road widened, and Mr. Shand added his part of the 
purchase to his own adjoining lands.* It has been 
already stated, in the section of Antiquities, that an 
ancient cottage stood at the north end of this locality, 
which, with its yard and outbuildings, was sold to the 
late Mr. Roach, who took down the buildings, and, in 
the year 1810, erected and formed, for the convenience 
of his villa, the stabling establishment that is now on 
the sites of the old cottage and out-offices. The alte- 
rations made in this part of the road have been highly 
advantageous to the community at large, particularly 
as regards its appearance, and safety of passage. 
Mr. Backhouse died on the 6th August, 181 1. 

Jutting out, in a wedge-like shape, from locality 50, 
a, to the south, is locality 68, a, the property of the 
representatives of the late Mr, Joseph Ellinthorp, who 

* The portion of this land sold to Mr. Shand amounted to. .£213 17s. 
Ditto do. to the Township 186 3 

£400. 

The Township paid £64 3s. 

The Old House sold for 43 

The foUowing gentlemen contributed :> 

Geo. Roach, Esq £30 

N. Waterhouse 10 

T. F. Dyson, Esq 10 

T. Tattersall, Esq 5 

S.Hope, Esq 5 » 

Seacome Ellison, Esq 5 

J. Mc George, Esq. ....... . 1 

G. Goring, Esq 5 

J. Carson, Esq 3 

J. Higginson, Esq 5j 

£186 3 



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308 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

died in 1829, aged 88 years. For a long series of 
years he officiated in the affairs of the township, in a 
somewhat similar character to that of clerk to the 
justices of the peace, but the emoluments, arising 
from his services in the above capacity, were always 
much more circumscribed than are those of legitimatq 
clerks of the magistracy. Mr. Ellinthorp resided in* 
Everton for nearly sixty years, and was well ac- 
quainted with the township's affairs. Some passages 
of this treatise have been drawn from his information,^ 
but unfortunately the compilation of the work was not 
contemplated until his years and infirmities had weak- 
ened his powers of memory. Some time previous to. 
the ye^r 1780, Mr. Ellinthorp established the first 
school of any note that is known to have been opened 
at Everton ; but it is now very long "since he gave it 
up, and retired on a competence equal to Iris wants,^ 
if not to his wishes ; he built all the houses which 
stand on locality 68, a, save the one second on the 
south. In taking leave of this patriarch of Everton, 
it must be said, that the true cause of Iris making little 
progress in popularity, at- which it was evident he 
sometimes aimed, was, that he lacked the suaviter in 
onodo, possessed, or at least seemingly possessed, by 
all popularity-hunters. In one of the houses belong- 
ing to the heirs of the late Mr. Ellinthorp the post- 
office of Everton is established, kept by a Mr. Edward 
Thomas, where letters are received, and despatched 
from and to Liverpool daily, Sundays excepted,, at 
the hours of twelve at noon, and eight at night. 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 309 

' It may be as well now to step across the road of 
BrQW-side, where, on an insular patch of land, stands 
not only the locality 62, a, but also, on the north of 
that locality, a spot of ground belonging to the town- 
ship, admirably adapted for a small public building — 
such as a free-school, for instance. There is a short, 
narrow passage which runs the greater part of the way 
between the ground of the township and the north 
£arts of locality 62,- a ; the south front of which loca- 
lity is 'filled up with small-sized dwellings, that have 
been already noticed in the section of Antiquities. At 
the westernmost of these dwellings is a manufactory 
of that luscious and far-famed commodity, called 
"Everton Toffy; " which for more than twenty years 
has been conducted under the management of Mrs. 
Cooper. 

On the south, or in the front of these last-named 
dwellings, and separated from them by an ancient 
foot-path over the brow, lies a triangular-shaped patch 
of land, bounded on all sides by the public roads ; this 
is locality 61, a, the property of the township. This 
spot of ground has been frequently enclosed with 
strong wood rails, at the township's expense, but 
mischief, malice, or wantonness have constantly de- 
stroyed them; it has been lately determined, how- 
ever, to have this lot surrounded with a strong, but 
low stone wall, surmounted with handsome iron rail- 
ings, within which the whole lot is now enclosed,* 

* The exterior wall, 164 yards, was contracted for at 8s. 6d. per yard for 
the stone- work, and 9s. for rails, exclusive of gates and gardeners' work. 



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310 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

and the interior is in the course of preparation for the 
reception of shrubs and pleasure-ground decorations ; 
so that these things, together with the tasty manner 
in which the stone-jug or bridewell, which stands 
in the centre, has been lately embellished, greatly 
ornament this part of the township. The bridewell is 
a mere stone-jug or watch-box, a diminutive building, 
and, as regards its interior, a dark, damp strong-hold, 
for the temporary reception and incarceration of the 
unruly, the vicious, and the criminal, that is, until 
a magistrate's committal consigns such unfortunate 
human beings to a more fit and congenial place of 
confinement. This apology for a bridewell ought to 
be taken down — it is a discredit to the community, 
whose good taste and liberal views, in most cases, 
lead them to do what is proper and needful ; a trifle 
assessed on the annual value of each one's property 
would serve to erect, on a small scale, a suit of 
buildings on this eligible spot. The place would be 
highly convenient for the purpose ; and the buildings 
ought to be sufficiently spacious for Tiverton's parochial 
and constabulary affairs to be conducted therein. But it 
would only cost what might be termed a bagatelle, so 
far as regards the wealthy settlers and land-owners of 
Everton, were they to erect a handsome and spacious 
suit of buildings, which should comprise a set of 
offices for the high-constable and tax-collector; a 
secure, convenient, and decent jail or bridewell; 
and a good sized apartment, capable of containing 
the inhabitants of the township, whenever they 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 311 

might be convened together, to deliberate on public 
affairs. At present this appeal, or recommen- 
dation, may be disregarded and inefficient, but, as 
the poet says, though in a different sense, " to this, 
good people, ye must come at last;" for awhile the 
convenience of Kirkdale jail may delay the execu- 
tion of the plan, but, of a certainty, it is destined at 
some time or other to be done. 

A vague rumour has latterly arisen touching this 
spot of land, locality 61, a; it has been indirectly 
and distantly hinted, that it was given to the town- 
ship on a condition, viz., that a church should be 
built thereon, but there is no evidence in the archives 
and' public documents of the township which leads to 
such a conclusion; on the contrary, on consulting 
the town's book, it appears that on the 18th April, 
1770, Mr. Seacome sold this land, with a barn that 
stood on it, to the township for £20 ; but there is no 
stipulation made in the deed of transfer that a church 
should be built thereon, nor does the word church 
appear in any part of the transaction.* 

From what in the old map is called " Prison-yard," 
it may be as well to cross the broad road, called Brow- 

* John Lyon, who is one of our oldest living Evertonians, most 
positively bears evidence, and asserts, that the " Barn on the Hill," 
formerly the property of the late Mr. J. Seacome, was rented for a 
number of years, by the father of the said John Lyon ; and that the said 
Barn on the Hill stood near to the present bridewell or stone-jug 
of Evertonj and that the land round it is the same which is now enclosed 
with walls and rails ; and moreover, that he himself, when a young lad, 
assisted to pull down the said Barn, which was an old building of 
stone and clay, and thatched. \%tk October, 1829. 



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312 . HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

side, to localities 36, a, 36, b, and 36, c, Avhich on 
their south sides are bounded by Rupert-laue ; in- 
deed they form the entire length of the north side of 
that lane. In the year 1 790, all these lots were the 
property of the late William Harper, Esq., who pur- 
chased them piece-meal, and at length consolidated 
them into one extensive and truly delightful villa; 
such it still remains, diminished only by a separation 
(as to ownery) from the eastern parts. 

Mr. Harper erected the mansion, which graces 
this charming spot, which he highly embellished in 
varkms ways, at such a considerable expense, that if it 
were stated, it would, scarcely be credited; in extent 
of valuable ground, and delightfulness of situation, it 
stands almost unrivalled at Everton : this extensive 
and beautiful 'villa, except the easternmost parts, as 
before noticed, is now the property of Charles Shand, 
Esq., a merchant of the very first grade in Liverpool, 
who is much respected and esteemed by the whole 
community of Everton, and one who never hesitates 
to step forward when the need, or the seeming need, 
of the township's interests demalid his service : but to 
the annals of Liverpool belong the biographical 
notices of Mr. Shand, as well as of a great majority of 
the merchants of that vast trading town, who now 
reside, or have heretofore resided, at Everton. Mr. 
Shand has long resided at this his delightful villa. 

Locality 36, 6, is the spot where an old cottage 
stood, which was once the dwelling of Lecturer Har- 
rison, as is noticed in the section of Antiquities: Mr. 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 313 

Harper took that cottage down, and formed a complete 
stabling establishment on its site and adjacent grounds : 
but those stables, &c, about eighteen years ago, were 
converted into a very respectable, genteel, and even 
elegant place of residence, by their present proprietor, 
Joseph Pilkington Brandreth, of Liverpool, M. D., 
who was, until very lately, the proprietor also of the 
adjoining lot, 36, c, on which the late Mr. Harper 
erected an excellent dwelling for the use and comfort 
pf his parents in their latter days. This last named 
dwelling has been for some years past, and until very 
recently, a seminary for young ladies, which was 
conducted by the Misses Paisley. The present pro- 
prietor of locality 36, 6, is son to the late celebrated 
Dr. Brandreth, who for many years stood at the head 
of the list of Liverpool physicians ; the present Dr. 
Brandreth sedulously aims to acquire his late father's 
celebrity, which, if he attain, the greater merit will 
be his, for emulation must be his chief, impulse, 
fortune having highly favoured him in pecuniary 
matters : he married the youngest daughter of the 
late William Harper, Esq. Previous to the year 
1787, Rupert-lane (now so called) was a slovenly, 
sandy road, ill fenced, and deeply cart-rutted, with 
many other dangerous hollows on its surface; and 
for a great number of years a pinfold,* of rude 
construction, but in perfect keeping with the road 
itself, had stood on the north side of the lane, near 

* See a minute made in the town's books in the year 1764, and 
another minute made in the year 1787. 



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314 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

to, if not precisely on, the spot where the main 
entrance gates to the villa of Charles Shand, Esq. 
are now placed. 

In the year 1787, the late W. Harper, Esq. pro- 
jected and carried to completion the improvement of 
Rupert-lane ; in a short space of time he transformed 
it into very nearly what it is now, a good, hold, safe, 
and useful road. When it was contemplated to 
improve this road, loud were the murmurings, and 
strong the opposition, of the old nobles of Everton ; 
their arguments against the proposed undertaking, 
however, seldom went farther than such expressions 
as the following j "they would na* he fashed with 
new-fangled notions and foolish plans ; " but it is 
probable their real objections were grounded on the 
contemplated expenditure of near two hundred pounds 
on so short a length of road. Mr. Harper, however, 
proceeded in his undertaking; he advanced most of 
the money required, and, in some degree on his own 
responsibility, perfected the improvement. In the 
course of time, the discontented perceived the advan- 
tages achieved, and Mr. Harper was repaid his outlay, 
but whether with or without thanks, tradition doth not 
say. It might have been fortunate for Everton, had 
Mr. Harper considered the township a field wide 
enough in which to exercise his enterprising spirit; 
but the neighbouring town of Liverpool presented to 
his view more tempting allurements — higher, and 
every way more extensive scope for his aims. In 
Everton he knew that the directors of its affairs were, 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 315 

and long had been, deeply entrenched in old habits 
and parsimonious measures ; they also conducted their 
public and private affairs by codes, and rules, and 
customs of almost antideluvian date; under which 
pristine kind of government, Everton might have 
continued even to the present day, had not bolder and 
more enlightened men settled in the township — men, 
by whose liberal and energetic measures, the anciently 
slovenly outside of Everton has been polished into 
neatness and beauty, and the township's municipal 
matters placed on a respectable footing, and conducted 
with precision and propriety. 

Mr. Harper soared higher — he sought and obtained 
the most' eminent civic honours in Liverpool ; and, 
having accumulated great wealth in commercial pur- 
suits, retired to spend the evening of his life, in the 
way most commercial men anticipate will be their lot, 
that is, in sylvan abodes. "With the enjoyments and 
employments of a rural life, on a noble estate in the 
county of Chester, he passed the last years of his life, 
and died there on the 9th December, 1815. 

There is another triangular-shaped patch of land in 
Everton, considerably larger than that on which the 
bridewell stands, the south and the east fronts of 
which form one half of what is named the village ; 
while the other, or north front, forms the south side 
of Rupert-lane; at the south-west comer of this 
land stands a building, which for more than half a 
centuiy has been the coffee-house of Everton: the 
locality is marked 11, a, on the map. In the year 



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316 . HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

1 790, and long previous to that epoch, this place was 
the property, as it is still, of the Golightly family — a 
family of old standing, and high respectability, iri 
.Liverpool. This house must have been first licensed 
about th£ year 1770; it would appeal' that one 
Anthony Spencer was nearly the first, if not the very 
first publican, that carried on business at the place. 
Since Spencer s time several have occupied the 
house ; one Ritson followed Spencer, and after Rit- 
son, the house was kept by a person named Hoyle, 
who w r as drowned in the Leeds canal. After Mr. 
Hoyle, came Mr. John Hogg, a person perfectly in 
the recollection of many now living at Everton; and 
Mr. Hogg's successor is the present host of the 
coffee-house, Mr. William Halliday, who entered upon 
the establishment in the year 1803. It is due to Mr. 
Halliday to state, that he is assiduous to please, 
correct and orderly in his conduct, unobtrusive in his 
manners, and moderate in his charges : all which is 
fully proved by his twenty-six years' creditable ma- 
nagement .of the concern. It is at this house that the 
public affairs of the township have been long, and 
still are transacted. In former days the accommoda- 
tion of the house was sufficient for the uses and 
purposes of the inhabitants, but the day will very 
soon arrive, if it has not already arrived, when 
Everton will require a more extensive and commo- 
dious place for the transaction of its public affairs in 
a becoming and efficient manner. 
- The prospect in the north-west of the coffee-house 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 317 

is truly delightful ; and in fine weather, on Sundays 
and holidays, the place is generally crowded. Of late 
years, however, the steam-vessels have earned to 
Cheshire much of the company which otherwise would 
have visited this once favourite place of resort, 
r The locality, on the east, adjoining the coffee-house, 
and marked 15, p, on the map, has two fronts, the one 
to* the village, and the other to Rupert-lane. In the 
year 1790, it was possessed hy John Rowe, Esq. and 
others, but is now parcelled into many properties, 
and nearly covered with various handsome buildings, 
which have attached to them gardens, courts, and 
pleasure-grounds, on a small scale. On the south 
part of this locality there are also a builder's workshop, 
timber-yard, and joiner's establishment. The north 
front of this locality opened into what is now called 
Rupert-lane ; and on this lot, exactly opposite to the 
old pinfold, formerly stood the town-smithy, . in the 
rear of which was the smith's house, a better sort of 
cottage, together with, on its south side, a little spot 
of garden-ground ; the smith's premises occupied the. 
space or site where three very handsome dwelling- 
houses now stand, named Rupert-place, the first of 
which was erected by Mr. John Mc George, in the 
years 1811— 12. 

« This smithy was taken down in the year 1810; it 
was a place, however, as deserving of note and record 
as was that of Shakspeare ; the news canvassed and 
disseminated at the Evertdn smithy, was of a higher 
and more valuable cast than is commonly gossiped at 



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318 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

such places; for, during the times here alluded to, 
the smith of Everton, (the late worthy and wealthy- 
Mr. George Mercer,) being gifted with a talent, or 
instinct, of distinguishing and identifying vessels at a 
great distance, drew about him all the upper classes 
of Everton, who were interested in marine affairs ; for 
vessels that he had once seen he scarcely ever after 
failed to recognise, whenever they came again within 
the range of his almost magical telescope. 

It. was the custom of the merchants of Everton, and 
also of many people of Liverpool, interested in ship- 
ping, to repair unto, and consult with, the intelligent 
smith of Everton, who very frequently put to shame 
the vigilance and ability of the superintendent of 
Bidston light-house. At length, on a spot of ground 
a few yards distant, on the west, from his smithy, an 
observatory was built, where, when the tide served, 
the worthy smith would take his station of survey, 
and cheerfully give — for he was good-nature per- 
sonified — information to all who sought it at his hands> 
or, to state more truly, at his eyes. 

Mr. Mercer's friends became numerous, and their 
proposals to amend his prospects in life seemed sin- 
cere and staunch, in consequence of which, he com- 
menced business as an ironmonger, and smith, in 
Liverpool, and in a very few years accumulated a 
handsome fortune, with which he retired to a rural 
spot in Kirkdale, where he passed the remainder of; 
his days in ease and comfort; he died on the 24th 
November, 1819, aged 65 years. 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 319 

Thomas Lowrie, Esq., a banker of Liverpool, erected 
a very handsome house at the north-east part of loca- 
lity 16, by where he resides. This lot has also two 
similar fronts with the locality 15, p; and more re- 
cently, Mr., Lowrie took down an old barn, which 
stood a few yards on the west of his own residence, on 
which site he has built a commodious and genteel 
dwelling-house, with its front to Rupert-lane. 

It was in Rupert-lane, nearly opposite to Mr. 
Lowrie's house, that, on the night of the 25th April, 
1818, a desperate and sanguinary conflict took place 
between two robbers, and a man whom they had robbed 
on the highway at the Breck ; the man, it seems, kept 
sight of them until he procured the assistance of 
another person y but on attempting to secure the high- 
waymen, the individual who had been robbed was des- 
perately wounded with a shoemaker's knife, and left 
for dead on the road ; — the robbers were subsequently 
taken, tried, and transported. 

Returning to locality 15, p, on its south part, front- 
ing the village, resides, at a handsome house, erected 
in the year 1811, by Mr. Mc George, a very worthy 
and excellent lady, whose name is Topping, sister to 
the late William Harper, Esq., and a branch, or de- 
scendant, of a very ancient Everton family, her mother 
having been the sister of the late John Pyke, Esq. 
There have been many instances of longevity at 
Everton; among others may be named that of the late 
much respected Mrs. Harper, mother to Mrs. Topping, 



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320 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

who died 6th September, 1819, aged 90 years, having 
lived to the days of her great great grandchildren. 

The next dwelling in the village on the east of Mrs. 
Topping's, is a place of high repute and consideration 
with all holiday-folk, and lovers of sweets, the property 
and residence of Mr. Robert Sandiford, son-in-law 
and successor to Mrs. Mary Bushell, the first inventor 
of Everton toffy ; of the invention and progress to cele- 
brity of this article, more will shortly be stated. 

Adjoining Mr. Sandiford's, on the east, are the late 
dwelling, workshop, and timber-yard of Mr. John Mc 
George, who built this house, and established his 
works here, in the year 1807; but he has recently 
quitted the place, to reside in John-street, on the north 
boundary of Everton. These three last-named pro-" 
perties form the greater part of the south front of loca- 
lity 15, p. Of Mr. Mc George, much might be said ; 
but the object must be to compress multum into parvoS 

Mr. Mc George settled in the township in the year 
1804, and has exemplified and proved the force and 
truth of that good old adage, which tells us, " Civility 
is never cast away;" his habits are industrious, his' 
talent good, and his efforts have been successful ; there 
is little doubt, therefore, of his ultimately retiring from 
the cares of business with a good name, and a heavy 
purse. Mr. Mc George has a turn for antiquarian 
studies, but there is no field at Everton wherein such 
pursuits could be advantageously followed : his efforts, 
in many places, have much embellished the township^ 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 321 

and his public and private conduct lias been exem- 
plary. It will be well, therefore, for all industrious 
persons who may hereafter settle in the township, 
to follow in his footsteps. 

It must not be omitted to state here, that formerly 
a style-road ran across this locality, 15, p, from near 
to where the pump stands in the village, to the smithy, 
which stood in what is now called Rupert-lane \ this 
style-road benefited the township little if any tiling 
more than that it afforded a ready access from the 
village to the smithy. "When the latter was removed, 
this private road became valueless ; and moreover, 
as the whole land through and over which the styles- 
road ran, including the smithy, were one property, it 
might be deemed only a back road to that place, as it 
was in reality on sufferance, formed and tolerated, 
perhaps, by the tenants of the smithy for the accom- 
modation of its customers.* 

The next lot in the village on the east of Mr. Mc 
George's premises, is the south part of locality 16, 6, 
on which stood an old cottage, which has been already 
noticed in the section of Antiquities; this cottage, 
for many years, and nearly to the time of its being 
demolished, was tenanted by Mr. John Lyon, who 



* There is little probability of this road being ever claimed by the pub- 
lic, but should such a measure be attempted, the compiler of this treatise 
ventures to assert, that the public would lose the object in view, it being 
now upwards of fifty years since the writer of this note first knew the 
style-road in question, and then, as well as ever since, that path was 
always known to be called, and considered, a back or private way to the 
smithy. 



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322 . . HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

was for some time high constable of Everton, and 
nominal factotum of the township's executive affairs'; 
he was a farmer and dairy-man, on whom fortune 
frowned, and having never diligently attended to 
scholastic studies, he was superseded in his offices by 
men better versed in clerkship lore, and is now obliged 
to toil constantly and hard ; but in all likelihood, had 
he been somewhat better schooled in his early years, 
he, even now, had been acting the parts of high 
constable, tax collector, &c. &c. of the township of 
Everton. 

The dairy establishment was modernized and con- 
ducted, after Mr. Lyon's abdication, by Mr. Richard 
Naylor, who purchased the concern, and the copyhold 
also. Mr. Naylor took down the old cottage, and on 
its site erected a snug convenient dwelling, and the 
needful offices for an extensive dairy establishment; 
he has, however, recently transferred the management 
of the concern to other hands, having retired to more 
congenial employment. There is a well in the public 
road, near to Mr. Naylor' s property, a few yards west 
of the house door : it appears, by a minute inserted in 
the town's book, that a pump was put down into this 
well in the year 1815 ; prior to that period, the public 
drew water from it by means of a bucket, and various 
times and oft are charges made in the township's 
accounts, for "new buckets," and for "mending 
buckets ; " the putting down of this pump, therefore, 
may eventually prove a measure of economy and con- 
venience. 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 



323 



The next locality, on the east, to Mr. Naylor's pre- 
mises, is 55, a, which has been for a great length of 
time the property of an ancient Everton family, whose 
sirname is Anderton. Many individuals of this family 
have, for a long series of years, figured, in their own 
plain way, in the annals of the township, one of whom 
served the offices of high constable, &c. of Everton 
for thirty-seven consecutive years ; nor is it very long 
since they quitted Everton as a place of residence : 
it is said, indeed, that only one of this family is now 
living that bears the name of Anderton, and he not a 
sojourner in the local land of his fathers. Merely to 
exhibit how moderate the charges of lodgings were at 
Everton in olden time, it is stated here, that R. P. 
Buddicom, Esq., father to the worthy clergyman of 
this place, had a furnished parlour, and an excellent 
bed-room, at this mansion of the Anderton's, in the 
year 1770, at the rate of 2s. 6d. per week. One of 
the last of the Andertons followed the trade of a 
wheelwright on these premises. The old buildings, 
which are still standing on this locality, are noticed 
in the section of Antiquities. 

On this property of the Anderton's, and nearly 
opposite to the ancient cross, which stood midway in 
the public road, long dwelt Mrs. Mary, or as she was 
always styled, Molly BushelL Mrs. Bushell was the 
original manufacturer of Everton toffy---an article too 
well known, and too highly appreciated, to need com- 
ment, elucidation, or eulogy here. It is said, that this 
esteemed article owed its origin to a kind-hearted 



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324 , HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

medical gentleman of Liverpool, who ranked high in 
his profession ; this gentleman visited Mrs. Bushell 
professionally, and noticing that her industrious and 
laudable exertions to provide for the wants of her 
family were barely rewarded with a sufficiency, sug- 
gested to her the idea of making an experiment in 
fabricating and keeping this toffy for sale, and the 
worthy doctor gave her a recipe for the composition 
of this* delicious compound ; — would that all recipes 
were as innocently and pleasantly compounded! By 
adhering to the formula .of that recipe, Mrs. Bushell ac- 
quired her great name; and also thus, secundum artem, 
did she administer to coughs, colds, sore throats, &c. 
— the medicine proving not only palateable to the ail- 
ing, but to the convalescent also, and even to those of 
" constitution sound and strong," all degrees of per- 
sons flocked to Mrs. Bushell's laboratory, to taste and 
to try the efficacy of the most celebrated and admired, 
if not the most serviceable, prescription the good doctor 
ever wrote. So eulogised is this toffy, that strangers 
seldom visit Everton and its vicinity without taking a 
quantity of it with them on their return homeward. 
A Son of Mrs. BushelTs (John), now grown old, still 
dwells in the township, and loves to linger among the 
haunts of his young and happy days ; he is a harm- 
less individual, and familiarly known to every inmate 
of the village as c "old Johnny Bushell." The old 
buildings on the premises of the Andertons have been 
already noticed ; at the front of those old buildings 
there were benches fixed, on which, in fine weather, 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 325 

the ancient nobles of Everton delighted to assemble, 
and to converse on foreign and domestic affairs ; in 
summer time, this spot might have been styled the 
evening Rialto of Everton : nor was it always occupied 
by the sage and the hoary, for it was a rendezvous for 
the young, where they assembled to make merry at 
the cross, which stood exactly opposite the residence 
of the Andertons. How altered is the scene now ! the 
cross has been removed, the favourite benches of the 
lords of Everton' s soil are neglected and deserted — 
the modern nobles of Everton being fonder of reposing 
their limbs on cushioned chairs and costly couches, in 
the perfumed air of crowded rooms, than to enjoy the 
healthy, wholesome air of early evening, in the friendly, 
humble manner of the ancient possessors of the soil. 
The property of the Andertons has also two fronts, 
but on the north, or that part fronting to Rupert-lane, 
there are not any buildings as yet erected. 

On the east, adjoining the property of the Anderton 
family, lies locality 20, &, which in the year 1790 
was, and previous to that period, from time immemo- 
rial, had been, the property and place of residence of 
another very ancient Everton family, named Rice,* 
The Rices were long extensive proprietors of Ever- 
ton' s soil; and some considerable and valuable lots 
of Everton land were left to his grandchildren by the 
last of that family bearing the name of Rice : the 

* In the year 1790, there was a plot of ground, with houses thereon, at 
the top of Everton-brow, owned by another family of the name of Rice j 
these latter-named Rices resided at Bootle. 



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326 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

name, however, is now extinct in the township, and 
the property has descended to relatives of other names, 
one of whom, Mr. Edmund Mawdsley, the grandson 
of the late Mr. E. Rice, has been already mentioned 
in the section of the south district, where he resides ; 
and he, together with one or two cousins, of the name 
of Dale, inherited all the remaining Everton posses- 
sions of the Rices of Everton. 

The southern part of locality 20, 6, which is much 
the greater, is now the property of the family of the 
late Rev. Johnson Tatlock, where his worthv widow 
now resides. The son and only child of the late 
Rev. Johnson Tatlock is heir to much valuable 
property in Everton. This residence was greatly 
improved, embellished, and modernized, about twenty 
years ago, for the occupation of Mrs. Gregson, the 
widow of the late John Gregson, Esq., formerly a 
banker of Liverpool, and who long resided at an excel- 
lent villa, in the south-west district. This domicile of 
the Rices, which was originally a better kind of farm- 
house, with out-offices attached, was, at the time 
above stated, transformed into an elegant place, so far 
a§ regards its interior, thus strongly exhibiting Mrs. 
Gregson's superior taste and tact in the economy and 
arrangement of a genteel residence. It may not be 
omitted to remark here, that this and the adjacent 
spots have every appearance of having been the first 
settled parts of the township; the seed, germ, or 
origin of the village of Everton. On the north part 
of locality 20, 6, are a few small-sized houses, of 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 327 

modern erection; at the largest of these, a neat 
compact building, which fronts to Everton-village, 
resides a personage, who must not pass unnoticed in 
these annals. At this place Mr. William Shaw 
dwells, who may be styled Evertoris executive, for 
the onus, or, in humbler language, the weight and 
practical execution, of all its public business rests with 
him; who most certainly performs the multifarious 
and complicated duties of his offices to the satisfaction 
x>{ the entire community. Mr. Shaw seems to be 
possessed of physical and mental capacities commen- 
surate to the business he has to accomplish ; he is 
active, vigilant, prompt, and clear-sighted; he has 
a skill too in clerkship, that might put to the blush 
many a better-paid public functionary : he has the 
routine of the town's affairs at his fingers end; and 
were it not for form's sake, there would be little need 
to convene more than one periodical public meeting 
for local-legislature and municipal purposes; at all 
such meetings, however, Mr. Shaw's intelligence is 
conspicuous and serviceable, yet always given in an 
unobtrusive manner. It must not be omitted to ac- 
knowledge that much matter in these pages has been 
obtained through the instrumentality of Mr. Shaw. 

In the section of Antiquities, notice has been 
already taken of the old house which stands a few 
yards on the north of Mr. Shaw's dwelling; that 
ancient domicile is still the home of the lowly in life ; 
it is tenanted by a gardener, who is well-known 
throughout the township as a hard-working man, 



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328 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

would that it could be added, a temperate one. In 
the year 1815, John Pyke, Esq. erected a very 
good family-house, fronting Rupert-lane, at the north- 
west part of this locality (19, k). In the year 1801, 
the village road was widened and improved, by draw- 
ing a straight line along the east part of this locality, 
from the old house where Charles Stevenson now lives, 
to the north extremity of the village, where several 
roads meet, a place which long went by the name of 
the "Four-lane-ends." At the time of widening 
this road, an old building was taken down, which 
stood opposite to the west front of locality 17, m, and 
served for a bam, or such like purpose. The remain- 
ing part of the centre district of Everton still to be 
delineated is principally pastoral; here and there, 
indeed, are some detached places where buildings 
have been erected, and very recently several builders 
have commenced operations somewhat extensively in 
this quarter. 

At the four-lane-ends a melancholy and distressing 
accident occurred, on the 27th November, 1829 : by 
us short-sighted mortals, such events are too often 
regarded as unkind, if not cruel, visitations of provi- 
dence; but this is not the case, for our severest trials 
are useful lessons, to ourselves or to the world. He 
who doth not disregard the "fall of a sparrow," in 
His wisdom determines the length of man's life; some 
are permitted to live to the age of weakness and 
decrepitude, whilst infants, and even babes, are 
doomed to be smitten by death in the earliest stages 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 329 

of their existence ; it is our duty, therefore, resign- 
edly, and even thankfully, to bow to the strokes 
that God inflicts, for his ordinances have ever been 
founded in wisdom and goodness. The following 
account of this fatal accident is copied from the Albion. 
" A gig, containing a gentleman and his servant, on 
turning the comer where a foundation for a new house 
had been recently dug, about four feet deep, was 
precipitated therein, dragging with it three of the 
lovely children of Mr. and Mrs. Fleming, of Ever- 
ton-terrace. One fine boy, an only son, was killed 
on the spot, a sweet girl most dangerously hurt, and 
the third, a charming little girl, seriously injured. 
The poor children were looking into the foundation 
from that side of the causeway furthest from the 
middle of the road, where they ought to have been 
safe. And this very lamentable accident has arisen 
from driving, perhaps prematurely, a hard-mouthed, 
but partially-broken young horse. The gentleman 
and his servant escaped with little injury, but the 
former was much affected, and forthwith despatched 
his servant for medical assistance, appearing fully to 
appreciate the severity of the affliction which he had 
been the means of casually bringing upon the parents 
of the infant sufferers." 

From the village, along the left of the road, to 
locality 13, b y every thing remains much in the 
same state as it was in the year 1790, with the 
exception of some few houses now erecting at the 
west end of locality 17, c. About fifteen years ago, 



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330 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

a Mr. Gillespie formed a very pretty villa, and erected 
at its south front an excellent house, on locality 13, b. 
In summer this is a delightful situation, and in con- 
sequence of several houses having heen of late clus- 
tered together, the neighbourhood has hecome safer 
and pleasanter in winter; there seems, indeed, a 
disposition to create a populous community in this 
quarter; for the localities 13, 6, and 13, c, in par- 
ticular, promise to he very shortly plentifully studded 
with the domiciles of man. Two short* streets are 
now laid out in locality 13, c, wherein a few small- 
sized houses are built ; and on the east of the eastern- 
most street is the pleasant villa of Joseph Fry, Esq., 
who has erected a handsome mansion thereon, at 
which he resides. A little way on the east of the last 
named is a very pretty villa, the property of the heirs 
of the late Mr* Edward Rogerson, where he himself 
long dwelt : this villa stands on. the south-west part 
of locality 21, d. 

The late Mr., or, as he was familiarly called, 
" Neddy Rogerson," had much singularity of manner, 
but " take him for all in all " he was a well meaning, 
useful member of society : he had a particular habit 
of larding his conversations with ejaculations, such as 
"Eh! ah! O! aye! aye!" these monosyllables were 
constantly slipping off his tongue ; and his undevia- 
ting mode of greeting was " Ha' dun ye ? ha' dun 
ye?" which, was spoken with an emphasis and 
a raciness of style that never failed " to linger long 
on the listener's ear," and as seldom failed to move, 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 331 

as it were, galvanically, the risible muscles of his 
auditors' faces. 

Mr. Rogerson' s reputation stood high as an amateur 
M. D., yet not exactly so either, for amateurs 
practise without looking for pecuniary reward, but 
Mr. Rogerson both took, and expected a fee. The 
disease he professed to combat was the jaundice, or, 
as he called it, the janders. Many sought to possess 
the secret of Mr. Rogerson's panacea, but none could 
discover it; many said, and some thought, that his 
cures were effected by incantation ; be that as it may, 
cures were effected, and as to incantation, it is most 
likely it had its origin in a little ruse of Mr. Rogerson 
himself, for he once told a gentleman, who put the 
question to him, touching his treatment of patients, 
that "he cured the janders mainly by magic." 
Cures, however, as before stated, were effected ; but 
after all, there are good reasons to lead to the belief, 
that Mr. Rogerson was only the sleeping partner of 
nature; she doing all the work, whilst his incanta- 
tions gave to patients the required confidence and con- 
sequent patience. Poor nature ! many a regular M. D. 
treats thee not a jot more gratefully, for in millions of 
cases, like their brother Rogerson, they reap both the 
profit and the credit due to thy works ! 

The excellent house which stands on this south- 
west part of locality 21, d 9 was erected by Mr. 
Rogerson, who died suddenly near the place, on the 
16th June, 1814, aged 82 years. Adjoining the last- 
noticed villa, at the south-east part of locality 21, d, 



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332 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

is another very charming residence, called the "Odd- 
house/' which, together with the entire locality, was 
in the year 1790 the property of the Rogersons; but 
the Odd-house now belongs to the heirs of the late 
Rev. Henry Barton, whose veiy worthy widow was 
its last occupier; and at this villa this excellent 
gentleman and his widow died. The house is a 
compound of ancient and modern architecture ; the 
old dwelling, at several modern periods, having been 
aided in the way of space and accommodation, by the 
addition of adjunct buildings. This place was called 
the Odd-house in the year 1768, as may be observed 
on examining a map drawn up by the late Messrs. 
Yates and Perry; but in the year 1716, it was 
called Kennyon's-house, as appears by the old map 
in the town's chest. It is hinted here that, a little 
way on the north of the Odd-house villa, a road 
might be very advantageously formed to run west- 
w r ardly into Church-street, near to the east end of 
Priory-lane : were such a road formed, it would offer 
great accommodation to church-goers and others 
from the Breck. 

Prom the Odd-house in Breck-lane to the mere, 
along the whole line on the west of Hangfield-lane, 
there is only one dwelling, and that is a diminutive, 
though pretty lodge-like building, standing on the 
narrow neck of land fronting to Hangfield-lane, and 
forming the east part of locality 22, a, which, 
with the exception of a short length at its south part, 
is still in its pristine, pastoral state ; most certainly 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 333 

pastoral, for grass grows in all parts of it, except 
where men and cattle tread, and the wheels of 
vehicles occasionally roll ; but for about one hundred 
yards in length, or a little more, the south end of 
Hangfield-lane is paved, and on the east side a 
parapet is formed. The lodge previously alluded to 
Js the property of William Perry, Esq., and serves as 
an outpost of protection to the eastern parts of his 
property, no other dwelling being near this secluded 
habitation. A field's breadth distant on the north is 
the mere, which has been noticed in the early part 
of this section. 

Across the road, on the south-west of the mere, is 
locality 16, f; this extensive and valuable piece of 
land has been recently sold by Seacome Ellison, Esq. 
to Charles Eyes, Esq. ; and in the autumn of 1829, 
the architect commenced operations on this lot, where 
one or two houses are already nearly run up. Great 
has been the advance in the value of lands at Everton, 
even in these its eastern or interior parts ; for, in the 
year 1724, this identical piece of land (locality 16,/), 
together with two other parcels of land at Everton, 
measuring in the whole 4a. 1r. 6p., of which, this 
lot, 16,/, was 3a. Or. 22p., was sold for £84 10s.; 
and, in the year 1828, this particular portion of that 
sale was sold for about three thousand pounds. 

Adjoining the last-named property is locality 19, i, 
or Beacon-hey, which, in the year 1790, was one large 
undivided piece of land, the property of the heirs of 
the late Thomas Heyes, Esq. ; the land of this locality 



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334 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

is now subdivided and parcelled out amongst several 
proprietors. The north part is held in trust by Charles 
Okill, Esq., and others, for their children, who are 

some of the heirs of the late Woodhouse, Esq. 

Mr. Okill is the talented secretary to the committee 
of the corporate body of Liverpool j he resided for 
some time at Everton, and did much good and gra- 
tuitous service to the township; but a wider and a 
more profitable field for the exercise of his talents and 
abilities presented itself at Liverpool; and he has 
rendered very essential service to the authorities of 
that town, of wliich they have given many proofs, and 
have often declared they are sensible. 

At the east part of the north division of locality 19, 
i y there is a bowling-green ; this establishment was 
formed by subscription in the year 1822; the green 
is spacious, and embellished and accommodated with 
a handsome alcove, in which are convenient sitting- 
rooms for the subscribers ; it is nearly planted round 
with slirubs, and, on the whole, has a pleasing appear- 
ance. The members of this bowling-establishment 
are most respectable persons of Everton, Liverpool, 
and other neighbouring places. 

The remainder of this north division of locality 19, 
i, lying west of the bowling-green, is in the occupa- 
tion of Mr. Alexander Thompson, who has converted 
that portion into a nursery for horticultural purposes. 
Mr. Thompson was high constable of Everton for 
some years. 

The centre division of locality 19, i, is a large patch 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 335 

of pasture land, where, through the medium of a slwrt 
pump, a top-spring affords an excellent supply of good 
water — top-springs might be found at most places 
hereabout, by penetrating a few feet below the surface 
of the soil. The substratum here, and every where 
in this part, is composed of the reddish-coloured rock 
already noticed. This patch of pasture-ground is the 
property of John Pyke, Esq. 

On the south of Mr. Pyke's part of locality 19, i, 
is the south portion of Beacon-hey, the property of 
William Perry, Esq., who is also the proprietor of the 
adjoining large piece of land, marked 22, a, called 
Hungry-croft ; at the west part of which, Mr. Perry 
has formed, a delightful villa, and about twenty-five 
years ago erected there a spacious, commodious man- 
sion, at which he has ever since resided, for the prin- 
cipal part of each year. Mr. Perry's house stands 
pleasantly removed from the noise and bustling incon- 
veniences of a main highway, and, by a good private 
road, is accessible from Church-street. Mr. Perry is 
a surgeon, and has long stood at the head of that par- 
ticular part or branch of his profession known by the 
name or term of surgeon-dentist ; his business is con- 
ducted at Liverpool, where by talent, assiduity, and 
courtesy, he has raised himself high in the commu- 
nity's estimation, and, as a natural consequence, 
fortune has favoured him. 

The locality 13, a, is now much altered on its west 
and north-west parts: on the north-west there are 
two small residences, and also a large house, with 



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336 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

grounds attached ; at the latter, Mr. John Coleman 
conducts a very respectable seminary. With excellent 
abilities, this gentleman bent his attention, at an early 
age, to acquire the requisite knowledge for conducting 
an extensive and respectable academy, and, therefore, 
it is presumed, he must have commenced his present 
undertaking with the necessary qualifications. Youth 
are received at this establishment as full-boarders, 
as day-boarders, and as day-pupils; a gymnasium 
makes a conspicuous feature in the scene, from the 
main-road, being fixed in The play-ground of this 
seminary. The house in which Mr. Coleman resides 
was many years under construction ; the builder main- 
tains that such a mode of seasoning will ensure dura- 
bility, but time must put the truth or fallacy of his 
axiom to the test. 

About the year 1823, James Heyworth, Esq. built 
the very handsome range of red brick stabling, &c. 
which now stands at the south-west corner of locality 
13, a, fronting to Church-street ; the building contains 
a lodge, and in its rear are piggeries, poultry-yards, 
&c, constructed on plans as admirable as they are 
extensive and commodious. 

The little spot on the map, on locality 27, 6, oppo- 
site to Mr. Dyson's lodge-gates, across the road on 
the east, marks the site of a cottage, or rather a hut- 
tage, which stood there for a great number of years. 
This miserable abode of man has been razed to the 
ground ; the act was most humane, for it was a dark, 
dank, damp, and rheumatic-fever-begetting hovel j its 



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GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 337 

roof was sieve-like, its floor of soft clay, at all times 
fit for the potter's use, for it was constantly kept moist 
with rain, that was constantly dripping through the 
dilapidated roof, and kept properly tempered by the 
incessant trampling of the barefooted offspring of the 
poor tenants. So miserably necessitated are some of 
our fellow-creatures, that there is no hovel, however 
ruinous, or likely to produce disease, or otherwise 
miserably uncomfortable, that is not crept into and 
tenanted by human beings, who with patience calcu- 
late to endure, or with patches to exclude, the pelting 
and pitiless storm. 

The outbuildings, consisting of coach-houses, sta- 
blery, barns, &c. now standing on the west front of 
locality 39, 6, must have been erected some short time 
previous to the year 1800, by the late William Clarke, 
Esq., the younger: these buildings are attached 
to the villa belonging to the Waterhouse family. 
Although the ground hereabout has been almost 
reclaimed from its pristine marshy state, it is not 
entirely divested of its humid character: the names 
which these places retain, even to this day — "the 
Mosses," — are evidence of their once having been 
boggy, swampy, marshy lands ; but only in this part 
of the township is there evidence of marsh or moss 
having at any time existed at Everton. Two of these 
"Mosses," together with the Rye-croft, or Hey, — a 
piece of land close by, measuring in the whole two 
and a half acres, — were sold, in the year 1549, for 

z 



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338 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

£15; a copy of this deed of sale, the compiler of 
this treatise has in his possession. 

There is a patch, or portion of land, which still 
bears the name of the GREAT-hey (locality 17, a); 
but this part, which now measures 3r. 16p., is the 
remainder only of a very large piece of land, called, 
from time immemorial, the Great-hey, out of which, the 
villas of Mrs. Waterhouse, and Messrs. Hope, Higgin- 
son, Allcock, and Blundell, have all been formed. 



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SECTION VIII. 



HISTORICAL SUMMARY. 



It was only at a comparatively late period that Ever- 
ton emerged out of a state of rudeness ; much less 
than a hundred years ago, with perhaps one or two 
solitary exceptions, the township was inhabited by 
persons of the plainest rural manners, and of truly 
rustic habits. In the latter part of the last century, a 
few settlers from the neighbouring town of Liverpool 
were the first to introduce genteel manners and a 
polish into Everton society : a few eminent, and some 
humble merchants of that great commercial town, 
desirous of relaxation from busines, settled themselves 
on Everton-hill ; where, with every advantage of a 
rural residence, they were still not too far removed 
from the town's conveniences, and at hand and ready, 
when required, to aid or conduct their commercial 
enterprizes. Another advantage, possessed at most 
times by these trading settlers, was, that they could 
view the egress and ingress of the Liverpool argosies, 
and also note the general movements of the vessels of 



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340 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

that port iii wliich they were themselves directly or 
indirectly interested. 

It requires not the inspiration or the gift of a pro- 
phet, to predict that Everton is destined to be a place 
of great consequence ; the obscurity, insignificance, 
and humility in which it lay for many ages past, will 
shortly be contrasted with proud prospects and brilliant 
events: its late green sward is fast being covered 
with magnificent mansions, and multitudes of more 
humble dwellings; in fine, the township of Everton 
will be soon a sharer in the commercial fame and 
immense trade of its neighbour, — it might indeed be 
said, of its semi-self, — the town of Liverpool ; a town 
that, from its late rapid strides to eminence, may lay 
claim to the title of modern Tyre. 

In ancient times, Everton must have been consi- 
dered little other than a large farm or estate ; for the 
whole township or manor has been frequently, and 
at one swoop, conveyed or transferred, by gift or sale, 
as well by royal personages, as also by patrician, and 
even by plebeian, subjects of the realm. By a docu- 
ment, a copy of which will be found in the Appendix, 
it appears that Everton had, previously to the year 
1761, provided two soldiers for the state; but, on ac- 
count of the then small value of the township, was 
relieved of one-half of this impost, and, by the order of 
the magistrates, was then charged and directed to 
raise only one soldier for public service. At this 
period the population of Everton was very limited ; 
indeed, it is somewhat remarkable that, from the year 



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HISTORICAL SUMMARY. 341 

1327 to the close of the seventeenth century, so little 
increase took place in the numher of its inhabitants, 
as may be observed on inspecting the tables given in 
the appendix to this work. At so late a period as 
immediately previous to the parliamentary war, the 
stupid and barbarous belief of witchcraft existed at 
Everton ; for an entry, which was made in the town's 
accounts of the year 1761, treats of a certain witch 
Mary. Really, it is nearly incredible that our almost 
immediate ancestors should have been so besotted : 
will our posterity have any thing like this to charge 
us with ? 

The principal parts of the generalities of the history 
of Everton, previous to the early part of the eigh- 
teenth centuiy, have been given in the first sec- 
tion of this treatise ; and nothing on which national 
affairs can be said to be grafted or blended with its 
history appears on the records, which for the most 
part are comparatively modem, until the siege of 
Liverpool, which occurred in the year 1644, by King 
Charles' forces, under the command of Prince Rupert. 
Of this siege several versions are extant, all agreeing 
in the main, and from which, collectively, the follow- 
ing account is selected and compiled. 

On collating all the existing data of the siege of 
Liverpool during the parliamentary war, it would 
appear that Prince Rupert, having taken Bolton by 
storm, remained there a few days to refresh his army ; 
after which, in the latter part of the month of May, 
he marched to the attack of Liverpool, in the imme- 



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342 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

diate neighbourhood of which town, it is pretty clearly 
ascertained, he arrived on the evening of the first of 
June, 1644; and, in the first instance, commenced, 
or prepared to commence, his operations of siege on 
its north side, having, doubtless, received good infor- 
mation that on that side it was the weakest and most 
vulnerable ; the result shews that, if he acted on such 
information, it was substantially correct. It was not 
long, however, ere the prince discovered the disad- 
vantages that presented themselves to a besieging 
army on the north of Liverpool; for the ground there 
was only on a level with the town, whereas, on the 
east and south-east, its immediate vicinage was over- 
looked and commanded by high hills. Seeing that 
there was no chance of carrying the place by a coup- 
de-main, on the second of June, the prince changed 
his plan of operations ; he marched his army to Ever- 
ton, placed Ins soldiers in camps on the common, near 
to and around the beacon, and established his head- 
quarters at a cottage on the crest or south-east pail of 
Everton-brow. This cottage is well known, and has 
received notice in this treatise, under the title of 
Prince Rupert's head-quarters ; as to his officers, they 
were principally quartered at the houses or cottages 
of the village, some of which also still remain in very 
tolerable habitable condition. The prince raised a 
battery on a natural platform, or flat piece of ground, 
which lies some few yards on the south of the cottage, 
and, in the first instance, from that batteiy the town 
of Liverpool was cannonaded ; but the distance was 



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HISTORICAL SUMMARY. 343 

too great for carrying into effect this offensive opera- 
tion, therefore more advanced batteries were con- 
structed, on ground westward of where the king's 
statue, in London-road, now stands; and trenches were 
formed on the ground which runs north and south 
along the crest or upper part of Shaw's-brow, and on 
land that is now intersected by the upper or eastern 
parts of Hunter-street, Gerard-street, and Circus- 
street. It would appear, however, that neither from 
the batteries of Shaws-brow, nor of Everton, were 
sufficient breaches made to warrant the storming 
Liverpool on the south-east side ; for the defences in 
that quarter had been principally constructed of sacks 
of wool, which were piled up on the interior sides of 
hastily-formed mud walls — this wool had been brought 
to Liverpool by certain emigrant Irish protestants, 
who, having escaped the massacre of 1641, formed a 
valuable reinforcement to the garrison of Liverpool. 

As to the south and west sides of Liverpool, they 
were efficiently protected by the river and the pool ; 
in the latter, the tide flowed by where the Old-dock 
was, and where Paradise-street, Whitechapel, (for- 
merly Frog-lane,) and the Old Haymarket now are. 
But the prince, having received confirmation of the 
besieged town being vulnerable on the north side, 
attacked it on that side, and carried it by escalade and 
storm, about three o'clock in the morning of the 26th 
June, 1644; his soldiers put to death all they met 
with, until they came to the high-cross, which stood 
upon the spot where the town-hall now stands. 



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344 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

Here the prince's troops met with a regiment of 
soldiers, from the castle, who beat a parley, and de- 
manded quarter. This was granted them on their 
submitting to become prisoners of war, and on sur- 
rendering the castle to the prince : thus ended that 
siege of Liverpool. But not long after the place was 
re-possessed by the parliament, and accordingly, in 
the latter part .of the year 1644, the parliamentary 
Lieutenant-General Meldrum had command of the^ 
place. It is somewhat strange that tradition is silent 
on any remarkable event which may have occurred in 
Everton, during its occupancy by the troops of Prince 
Rupert; save that, during the siege (or, as some with 
more latitude say, during the civil wars) the clergy of 
Liverpool, being driven out of that town for their 
loyalty to their unfortunate king, solemnized several 
marriages at the beacon, then standing at Everton. 
Of course, to such holy and loyal persons, the Prince, 
who was nephew to Charles I., would afford his 
utmost protection. But there are some trifling affairs 
connected with the siege, traditionally handed down 
to a few of the elder of the now living inhabitants of 
Everton, one of whom can even point out the places 
where the holes in the rock are, or were, in which 
the flag-staffs of Prince Rupert are said to have been 
fixed. One of those places was a few yards north- 
east of the easternmost door on the north side of 
Prince Rupert's cottage; the other is on the north, 
across the road called Everton-brow, and opposite to 
Rupert's cottage ; this last place was formerly within 



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HISTORICAL SUMMARY. - 345 

the rails, but is now part of the parapet on the west 
of the coffee-house. It is said there were some 
inusquet or cannon balls found near Prince Rupert's 
quarters at Everton, and that those balls were in 
the possession of the late Matthew Gregson, Esq. 

There can be little doubt that the skeletons of two 
men, which were found in the cemetery of the church 
of St. George, at Everton, a few years ago, were those 
of two soldiers of Prince Rupert, that had been 
interred there, sans ceremonie, during the siege, for it 
is authentically stated, that his troops encamped near 
the beacon. The officers attached to the troops of 
Prince Rupert, who were encamped near the old 
beacon, had excellent quarters in two good dwellings 
which stood within a few yards of the beacon itself, 
and, as accords with undisputed tradition, one of those 
dwellings was a public-house; the soldiers would 
have all the advantages at hand, which surplusage of 
pay or booty could purchase for them. It is not 
recorded how the people of Everton were affected or 
disposed during the siege; it is, however, very 
strongly surmised, that they subscribed to the tenets 
of the Vicar of Bray, for it does not appear that 
injury was inflicted, or censure cast, on Everton's 
inhabitants, by either of the belligerent parties. 

There is the following passage in Gores' directory 
for 1829: "the hollow way to Everton" (from 
Liverpool) " to be made passable for man and cart — 
1663" — but where and what this hollow way was, 
it must be the business of the antiquarian to discover, 



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346 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

none being now alive, at Everton, who even know 
where the place was ; hut, as there was then hut one 
known main road to Everton, it may he veiy plausibly 
surmised, that this hollow way was Byrom-street. 

Although on the very precincts of Everton there 
are great public roads, which lead to the principal 
towns of Britain, yet through the township itself, no 
direct road passes to any place of material conse- 
quence :* from this circumstance there is something 
gained in the advantages derivable from privacy of 
situation; although much of it may be lost, when 
the township becomes more densely settled. It is, 
however, very advantageous to Everton that no pro- 
hibitory local municipal law, real or pretended, exists 
to forbid settlers to domicile themselves, or to carry 
on trade, in the township : this freedom and facility 
will lead much industry and talent into the place, 
when need shall require them, and which it is very 
probable will soon be the case. 

There is a circumstance connected with Low-hill, 
not generally known, touching the impolicy of muni- 
cipal prohibitory enforcements, ancient illiberal prac- 
tices, and injudicious by-laws, which now, thank 
heaven ! are deemed too obnoxious to be enforced, 
and are, indeed, almost obsolete ; and as the scene of 
the circumstance lies but a few yards from the south 

* The good and bold road now just formed by the junction of Shaw- 
street and the Netherfield roads, and the projected boundary roads, will 
present most admirable advantages to travellers, as they will constitute 
most convenient and spacious lines of communication between the 
London-road and the great North-road. 






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HISTORICAL SUMMARY. 347 

border of Everton, it may not be deemed altogether 
irrelevant to introduce the matter here. Some time 
about the middle part of the last century, a Mr. 
Savage (probably a Scotsman) had settled himself in 
the linen trade at Liverpool, where his business 
throve to his heart's content j but the common-council 
of that borough (who were for the most part traders 
themselves), instigated by prudence, or parsimony, or 
perhaps by patriotism, at length, with a by-law, 
ejected Mr, Savage from the town of Liverpool; 
he did not, however, remove his establishment to 
any great distance ; he fitted up a house which stood 
on Low-hill, and such was his celebrity in regard to 
the goodness and cheapness of his commodities, that 
the people of Liverpool flocked to his warehouse, and, 
in consequence, his business wonderfully encreased; 
nor was this all, for many settlers (aliens especially) 
removed, and others prepared to leave Liverpool for 
the neighbourhood where Mr. Savage had established 
his mart : and had not the prohibitory decrees of the 
wise men of Gotham been rescinded, Low-hill, aye, 
and probably Everton-hill also, had stood in rivalry, 
as to internal commerce, with the now lordly town of 
Liverpool; but be that as, it may, had not the restric- 
tive or prohibitory system been abandoned, Liverpool, 
at this time, would, perhaps, have been only a tenth- 
rate place of trade. 

Reverting again to the great high-roads, that one 
which lies in the south, called London-road, will pro- 
bably never much directly advantage Everton ; but as 



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348 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

the great nofth-road touches its north-west comer, 
Everton thereby will ultimately be much benefited. 
The circumstance of that road running through the 
village of Kirkdale; the presence of that stupen- 
dous, yet handsome erection, the house of correction ; 
and the proximity of the now-constructing north 
docks of Liverpool, must, after a time, convert the 
township of Kirkdale into consequence and value; 
at present the place is found to be fertile by hor- 
ticulturists, and until lately was a pleasant, rural, and 
sequestered spot. 

For many years the townships of Everton and 
Kirkdale had a copartnery of liability laid on them to 
raise each the fraction of a man for the militia; that is, 
on the supposition that six men were to be raised, 
Everton may have had three whole men to provide, 
Kirkdale two entire men, and the united townships 
furnished the sixth man at their joint expense; 
but the practice has been discontinued for some 
years. 

Previous to entering on the history of Everton 
during the nineteenth century, it may be as well to 
dilate on, and endeavour, in an historical way, to 
concisely connect, the most material of the minutes 
found recorded on the books of the township, (the 
earliest of which bears the date of 1731,) and to graft 
on them such matter as may appear pertinent to the 
subject. In the year 1731, as is usual now, the 
inhabitants of Everton annually met at certain periods 
to scan their past, regulate their present, and direct 



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HISTORICAL SUMMARY. 349 

their future affairs; in those days the constables of 
Everton were chosen yearly, according to what is 
termed house-row, that is, impartially, or in turn ; 
but the duties of the office were so light, that the 
person chosen had no difficulty in getting a substitute, 
who was glad to take the office on payment from the 
township of the small sum of 10s. per annum; the 
township also gave 10s. to some one able to wield the 
pen,* for ivriting the accounts. On looking over the 
account of expenditure for the year 1731, it appears 
that the small sum of £9 4s. 3d. was disbursed to 
defray the entire of the township's public expenses ; 
what a contrast this forms with the present state 
of Everton's financial affairs ! For the year 1828, 
ending in March 1829, the sum of £2,107 16s. 3d. 
was required, exclusive of the sums raised to pay the 
watchmen, of which no accounts are published. Great 
as the difference is, in a few years it will probably be 
much extended; therefore it is imperative on the 
authorities of Everton to check pauperism as much 
as possible, in a legal and humane manner; and as 
we English are a nation fond of precedents, it may 
not be amiss to refer those authorities to a minute 
made in the town's book, on the 20th June, 1754. 
(See Appendix.) 

Everton once had a share in a workhouse at Orms- 
kirk, but in the year 1818, the copartnery was dis- 
solved, which some think has been disadvantageous 

* To be able to write was no mean qualification, in those days, at 
Everton. 



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350 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

to Everton ; but ultimately, and not remotely, it will 
be found that the township must have its own poor- 
house, within its own territorial limits, and under the 
near and direct surveillance and management of its 
own authorities, otherwise the demands of the out- 
door poor will be clamorous, and their claims be 
found excessively expensive to satisfy. It has been 
suggested that an additional building, placed on the 
south of the pinfold-cottage, would serve for a work- 
house — perhaps the suggestion is good, and worthy 
of immediate consideration. 

It appears, in the town's accounts, that the wages 
paid a hundred years ago to a working man, at Ever- 
ton, was tenpence, and for a horse one shilling, per 
diem. These accounts also shew that formerly the 
inhabitants of Everton kept the beacon in repair, for 
a charge is there made to that effect, in the year 1734, 
but since then nothing of a similar nature is recorded 
in those transactions; but as to the ancient cross, and 
the dial thereon, they have frequently been repaired 
and kept in order at the town's charge — and why 
have that ancient relique and the poor man's clock 
been removed ?— there does not appear any minute 
on the books of the township to order or sanction the 
measure. 

In the year 1741, it is stated, " the boundaries were 
walked;" this should be a hint sufficient to remind 
ns, that it would be desirable and advantageous to 
direct certain officers, and a posse of the town's people, 
annually to "walk the liberties;" nor should parsimony 



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HISTORICAL SUMMARY. 351 

urge us to stint the order to the walk only, let refresh- 
ments, on a moderate and temperate scale, be provided, 
and the day will arrive when the youth of Everton 
will joyfully ask, "When will liberty-day arrive?" 
Such a feeling should be now excited, and continually 
encouraged. 

In the year 1744, the charge of 6s. for " journeys 
to Prescot about the papists," and the charge of 
Is. lOd. for searching the township of Everton "for 
papists," too plainly indicate the temper of the times 
preluding the civil war ; but Everton does not seem to 
have been much troubled with warlike proceedings, nor 
does it appear that any papists, at least none that 
proved troublesome, were found 5 but certainly the 
sound of preparation was made, the town's arms were 
cleaned and repaired, and a goodly muster must have 
been made on the occasion, for the repairs of those 
arms cost the sum of 2s. lOd. ! but, to speak seriously, 
it would seem that only one, or at most, some two or 
three, musquets were all the town could have pos- 
sessed; however the enemy came not, and the prowess 
of the Evertonians of that day was never tried. 

In the same year, 1 744, a share in the workhouse 
at Ormskirk was purchased, of which notice has been 
already taken 3 five pounds is stated to be the sum 
Everton paid for its share or interest in the building. 

In the year 1746, it would appear that the paviour 
made his first appearance in Everton, as may be 
gathered from the words of an entry made in the town's 
books that year ; latterly, however, he has had a fine 






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352 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

harvest in the township, where nearly a thousand 
pounds are annually spent on the roads ; hut seeing 
that it is spent, and, for the most part, advantageously 
to the community, we should not grudge the little we 
individually contribute of outlay, but rather rejoice 
that, in improving our ways, we are benefiting 
posterity. 

It is much to be wondered at, that until the year 
1749 the inhabitants of Everton took no steps to 
secure their public books and documents of value; 
in that year, however, they directed that a strong 
chest should be provided for the purpose, and accord- 
ingly, at the cost of twenty-six shillings, the measure 
was accomplished, and the chest then procured still 
lays claim to be the sole secure archives of Everton. 

Until the above year little notice seems to have 
been taken of the encroachment of individuals, who 
at their pleasure carted away the soil from the lanes, 
and, as it would appear, took slices from the highways, 
to add to their own possessions; but in this year 
(1749) the inhabitants of Everton resolved to check, 
and, indeed, entirely stop, those proceedings, for they 
passed resolutions to have the aggressing parties 
called upon, and payment demanded of them for acts 
of infringement; at the same time it was ordered, 
that such proceedings should not be permitted in 
future, without the sanction of the community having 
been first duly obtained. In or about the year 1754, 
there would appear to have been symptoms of a dis- 
position to build cottages, and introduce prospective 



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HISTORICAL SUMMARY. 353 

paupers into the township, for, at a meeting of the 
inhabitants of Everton in that year, it was resolved, 
that persons letting cottages should save the town- 
ship harmless from the expense that might accrue 
from their tenants becoming burthensome to the 
township. It might be advantageous to its present 
inhabitants to keep sight of the measures adopted by 
our predecessors of 1754. 

Passing on to the year 1 763, it appears that there 
was then certain waste land near the old beacon, part 
of the lease of 115 acres, which, not having been 
allotted to any particular individual, might, so far as 
regards the leasehold interest, be deemed the property 
of the township. In 1 763, this land was first let by the 
township, at 2s. 6d. per annum, to Henry Hardwar, 
Esq., the collector of customs, Liverpool, who resided 
at the house near to the old beacon, which is shewn 
in the plate given in this work, but the right of road 
to the beacon was reserved ; and in the same year 
the inhabitants of the township let a piece of land, 
called the "Netherfield-lane," to R. Lunt, for £3 3s. 
per annum — this must have been a large lot, and 
from subsequent circumstances appears nearly iden- 
tified with locality 23 b. 

In 1764 leave was given to Mr. Halsall to remove 
the pinfold that stood in what is now called Rupert- 
lane, which was carried into effect some years after- 
wards by the late Mr. Harper, or rather the walls of 
the old pinfold were razed, and another was constructed 
at the north end of Netherfield-lane north. 

2 A 



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354 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

In 1765 the land near the beacon was sold to H. 
Hardwar, Esq., reserving a road to the beacon, and 
this land now forms part of the cemetery, &c. of the 
church of St. George. In the year 1770 the place 
where the bridewell now stands was sold by the late 
J. Seacome, Esq. to the township for £20, as is stated 
more particularly in the section of General Observa- 
tions. It was at this place that the late Joshua Rose; 
Esq. proposed to build a church at his own expense, 
the foundation of which was commenced; but the 
project was given up, as is supposed, in consequence 
of a want of concert between the constituted autho- 
rities of Everton and Mr. Rose. 

It will be found in the town's accounts, that even so 
*late as 1774, the authorities of Everton had the libe- 
rality to keep the poor-man's clock in repair, for the 
dial on the cross was "squared" in that year. In 1 775 
Mr. Rose rented the Netherfield for £4 per annum, 
and in 1777 purchased it for £140; the description 
given of the place pretty closely identifies it with loca- 
lity 23, b. Soon after this period the south end of 
the road called Everton-lane, leading from Everton 
village to Low-hill, was altered ; and in 1 780 Mr. 
Rose was ordered to pay Mr. Gregson, out of the pin- 
chase money of the Netherfield-lane land, the "money 
Mr. Gregson had expended on the roads when he was 
in office." 

In the year 1787 a stone-jug or bridewell was built 
on the triangular patch of land lately walled and 
railed in, at the upper part of Everton-brow : such 



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HISTORICAL SUMMARY. 355 

an erection might have suited the temper and the 
exigencies of the times in which it was erected ; but 
how does it suit the temper and the exigencies of 
these enlightened times? To reply, would be to 
reflect on the intellectual attainments of the present 
inhabitants of Everton. 

. Surely this apology for a stronghold will be razed 
to the ground, and its site occupied with something 
more becoming and useful — and what would be the 
expense ? so little, indeed, that it would be scarcely 
felt, comparatively speaking, by such a wealthy and 
respectable community as that of Everton ; whilst the 
advantages to be attained would be great and many. 
Somewhere hereabout a large hall should be erected, 
in which the inhabitants of the township might conve- 
niently and comfortably assemble; the chief constable's 
offices, and even his residence, might be fixed here : 
a spacious bridewell might also be constructed, with 
the additional advantage of having secure archives' 
in which to deposit the township's books and docu- 
ments of value and interest. This last, indeed, 
is a necessary measure, for it is astonishing how 
few documents are now to be met with, touching 
Everton's public affairs j that many documents exist, 
there is little doubt, but most of them are missing, 
and in all likelihood they lie neglected among the 
family papers of persons formerly in authority at 
Everton; yet so supine, or so suspicious, are the 
representatives of those persons, that all applications 



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356 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

te recover, or even to inspect them, with scarcely a 
single exception, are and have been unsuccessful. 

In the year 1787, it was ordered that a lamp 
should he fixed on the bridewell; but the measure 
was never earned into effect. It somewhat ludi- 
crously occurred, that the high constable of Everton 
and his Jidiis Achates were the first prisoners who 
were incarcerated in this bridewell. It seems that 
the worthy smith of Everton, the late Mr. George 
Mercer, had a wag of a journeyman, who, under the 
directions and superintendence of the constable, placed 
locks, bolts, and other fastnesses on this petty-prison ; 
the smith had just completed his work, when the 
constable and his deputy stepped into the interior to 
examine the fitness and correctness of things ; but no 
sooner had the men of authority graced the interior 
with their presence, than the merry blacksmith turned 
the key of the outer lock, and leisurely walked away. 
The bawls and calls of the guiltless creatures, thus 
unexpectedly shut up in " durance vile," brought 
some stray passengers to hear their sad plaints, who, 
on receiving due instructions, proceeded to the smith's 
laboratory, and with proper petition or remonstrance, 
there and then made, softened the heart of Vulcan's 
mischievous son; for after treating the applicants with 
a joke to fit the occasion, he presented the key of the 
dungeon, and forthwith the entrapped men of authority 
were set free. 

In the year 1795, the charge of 2s. for making 



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HISTORICAL SUMMARY. 357 

four privy searches every year was discontinued ; 
this charge annually makes its appearance in the 
township's book, from the earliest date found there, 
which is that of 1731. It would appear that this 
custom of privy-search was formerly a national prac- 
tice, and an indispensable part of the duty of the chief 
constable of every township, &c] it was an investiga- 
tion or search after all ill-disposed strangers, aliens, 
improper settlers, or sojourners. Of course it is to be 
presumed, that such obnoxious characters, when 
found, were dealt with according to law, or the then 
general mode of punishment. The custom was what 
may be termed a H good old-fashioned measure," and 
might, under proper regulations, be practised now, 
and prove salutary. 

In the year 1801, the people of Everton very 
laudably took respectable and efficient measures to 
ascertain and mark their boundary lines, particularly 
on the side lying next to Liverpool, which was taking 
giant-like strides to encrease its size; for the archi- 
tects were even then spreading their buildings over 
the fair fields and pleasant places on every side, so 
that the people of Everton began to perceive that, in a 
very short period of time, the western parts of their 
township must be covered with dwellings and other 
erections for the use and convenience of man; in 
fine, that Liverpool and Everton must become so 
linked and blended together, as to present the sem- 
blance of one sole and single town. It will be seen, 
on a reference to the extracts from the town's books. 



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358 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

that on the 20th May, 1801, a number of the land- 
owners of Everton and others, accompanied by one 
of the late* rectors of Liverpool, set eight boundary 
stones " to the extent of the land belonging to Ever- 
ton, which lies opposite to the land belonging to 
Liverpool; the stones are marked 1800." .The 
names of the witnesses were Edward Rimmer, John 
Hogg, George Broadbent, and the worthy rector, 
who are dead; Peter Pownall, who has been long 
absent ; and John Bushell, who still remains in the 
township. At -the time now alluded to (1801), 
the late Mr. John Hogg was high-constable of 
Everton: he resigned his office in 1803. 

It will be, perhaps, the most perspicuous mode of 
proceeding, to give a statement here of the respective 
successors of Mr. Hogg in the constabulary depart- 
ment of Everton, as such a statement may tend to 
give a clearness of character to what will follow in 
these pages of the general affairs of Everton. On 
the resignation of Mr. Hogg, two candidates offered 
themselves for the office ; viz., Mr. John Lyon, and 
the late Mr. Joseph Ellinthorpe : Mr. Lyon was the 
successful candidate, at a salary of £21 per annum, 
with no allowance for a clerk.f This salary was 
inadequate, particularly without a clerk, as the person 
chosen for office had little other chance or prospect 
than that of his accounts gradually progressing into 

* Rev. R. H. Roughsedge. 
f Yet it appears that four guineas per annum were paid annually for 
keeping the accounts during the years 1803, 4, 5, 6, and 7. 



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HISTORICAL SUMMARY. 359 

.the most perfect confusion : his scholarship was un- 
equal to the duty he had to perform ; this truth was 
soon made evident; for it will be seen that, in the 
year 1808, Mr. Joseph EUinthorpe was placed as Mr. 
Lyon's coadjutor, their joint services being remune- 
rated with £50 per annum, and " to be allowed their 
necessary expenses," of course over and above their 
salaries. 

In the year 1808, the numbers of strangers, strag- 
glers, holiday, and other michievous visitors had 
become so great a nuisance, on account of their 
irregular and improper conduct, as to create a neces- 
sity to call for a levy of additional or temporary 
-eonstables, and, accordingly, a number of men were 
Mred to attend and scour over the township, on Sun- 
days in particular; their efforts, however, were not 
crowned with much direct success ; for the obstreper- 
ous strangers always contrived to escape apprehension: 
but in some degree, the measure resulted beneficially; 
for the very name itself of the precautionary measure, 
had much such an effect on the mischievous frequenters 
of Everton, as the smell or knowledge of the presence 
of a cat has, on those domestic depredators, rats and 
mice. The employment of extra constables, the shut- 
ting up of public-houses during the hours of divine ser- 
vice, and other salutary regulations, restored tolerable 
tranquillity and order to Everton on Sundays, holi- 
days, and indeed on all days; but, perhaps, the novelty 
and convenience of the steam-vessels, which carried 
the holiday loungers of Liverpool to the Cheshire 



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360 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

side, was the most beneficial relief, and mainly tended 
to restore to Everton its wonted order and tranquillity* 
Toffy-hunters, it is true, continue their peregrinations 
to Everton ; but who would be saucy or ill-behaved, 
whilst tasting the delicious productions of Mr. Sandi- 
ford's or Mrs. Cooper's delicious stores ? in such a 
case, sweet-mouthed civility ought to be the current 
language of Everton's visitors. Proceeding on with 
the constabulary history of Everton, it must be stated, 
that the united efforts of Messrs. Lyon and Ellin- 
thorpe, as time progressed, became less and less 
satisfactory to the lords and ley-payers of Everton : 
it moots not to enter on particulars ; suffice it at once 
and briefly to state, that the dissatisfaction of the 
inhabitants of the township, touching their constables' 
management, resulted in their dismissal from office. 
This measure was accomplished in the year 1813, 
when Mr. Alexander Thompson was elected high- 
constable, &c. of Everton, at a salary of £120 per 
annum; and in the year 1816, so satisfactorily had 
he performed the duties of his offices, that at a public 
meeting the sum of £21 was voted and paid him, in 
addition to his salary, in consideration of his able and 
effective services. Until the year 1820, Mr. Thomp- 
son continued to perform the duties* of his respective 
offices, and was much in favour with the inhabitants, 
when a defalcation in the payment due to government 
for the taxes of Everton was astoundingly announced. 
The sum supposed to be deficient was too considerable 
to be lightly noticed, therefore a meeting of the 



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HISTORICAL SUMMARY. 361 

inhabitants was called, and a public investigation 
took place, at which a deficiency of some hundred 
pounds was ascertained. The inhabitants were called 
on to provide for the liquidation of the deficiency, and 
of course Mr. Thompson lost his places. It ought, 
however, to be stated in extenuation (if the term may 
be used), that Mr. Thompson, when called on to 
account for the deficiency, explained that " he lost his 
pocket-book, and some hundred pounds which were 
therein deposited, no part of which," as he further 
declared, " did he ever receive back or recover." 

A committee was appointed to investigate and 
bring this unpleasant affair to a close, the result of 
whose labour does not appear in the town's books; 
but on the 20th November, 1820, the following state- 
ment was published, in the form of a printed cir- 
cular : — 

"The committee appointed at a general meeting of 
the inhabitants of Everton, held on the 31st January 
last, at Halliday's coffee-house, for the purpose of 
examining into the deficiency of Alexander Thomp- 
son, the late collector of taxes ; have to state to you, 
that the amount was, as nearly as they could ascertain, 
£700 ; but from the sale of his private property, and 
arrears collected and paid by his trustees to the 
present collector, the sum is reduced to £389, to 
provide for which, a rate of two shillings and one 
penny in the pound on the whole amount of the 
assessed taxes for the present year will be necessary 
to cover the same. The assessors of the township 



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362 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

have been called upon to make such rate, agreeable 
to act 43 Geo. 3, chap. 161, sect. 56. 

"Jonathan Brooks. 

" A. Thompson's account current has been left by 
.his trustees with Mr. W. Shaw, the collector, for the 
inspection of the inhabitants." 

The necessity of appointing an active, prudent, 
and efficient person to fill the office of high-constable 
of Everton, now very forcibly presented itself to the 
minds of the inhabitants of the township; induce- 
ments were held out, and considerable pains taken, to 
discover and bring forward respectable and competent 
candidates to offer themselves to fill the several offices 
of high constable, overseer, and tax-collector. Several 
persons presented themselves as candidates, and a 
meeting of the inhabitants was called, to select and 
elect the person who might be deemed most fit and 
proper to fulfil the then highly encfeased and pro- 
gressively encreasing constabulary duties at Everton. 
The choice fell on Mr. William Shaw, and it has 
been proved, that on no one more capable could such 
a choice have fallen ; but of Mr. Shaw's duties and 
abilities, much has been already stated in the section 
of General Observations. 

In the year 1828, the weight of Everton's public 
affairs became so much encreased, as to give rise to 
the necessity of having a deputy-constable; and 
accordingly, at a meeting duly convened, George 
Wrightson was appointed to that office, at a salary of 
£60 per annum; but the deputy did not continue long 



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HISTORICAL SUMMARY. 363 

in office, for, in consequence of incapacity or error, 
he was obliged to resign his situation, in February, 
1830. 

On the resignation of Wrightson, it became neces- 
sary to elect a person to supply his place, and two 
candidates offered themselves to fill the situation, 
Avhich is technically termed that of assistant-overseer. 
The parties were Charles Sandiford and William 
Smith. A short, but energetic canvass of the friends 
of both candidates took place ; and the inhabitants 
were called together on the 25th February, 1830, 
to make their selection. Accordingly, at six o'clock 
in the evening of that day, the rooms of Mr. Halliday 
at the Everton coffee-house were so crowdedly filled, 
as to raise alarm in the minds of some, touching the 
safety of their limbs, and even lives, should the extraor- 
dinary pressure on the floors cause them to give way. 

On James Atherton, Esq. being appointed to take 
the chair, William Robinson, Esq. proposed William 
Smith, and George Syers, Esq. proposed Charles 
Sandiford; the sentiments of the persons assembled as 
to the eligibility and fitness of each candidate for the 
office were taken, and the numbers for each appear- 
ing nearly equal, a poll was decided on, and for some 
time the voters came forward alternately for each 
candidate until the 27th round, when Smith's party 
became exhausted of voters for that evening ; but at 
that period the number of votes were in Smith's 
favour, for the poll had proceeded according to the 



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364 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

vestry act;* but on the side of Sandiford persons 
continued to vote until nine o'clock, when he had a 
majority of forty-one votes, and the poll closed for 
that night. Next morning the friends of Smith came 
in strength sufficient to reduce the previous evening's 
majority to eighteen votes against him; hut during 
the day the party for Sandiford exerted themselves 
so energetically and successfully, as to place him in a 
great majority, when the poll finally closed at six 
o'clock of the evening of the second day. 

The contest exhibited something of the character of 
similar affairs as occasionally conducted at Liverpool, 
and the tactics of some experienced electioneerers 
were called into play ; the female-housekeepers of the 
township were canvassed, and most of them voted ; 
the affair altogether formed a novel and remarkable 
feature in the quiet history of Everton. 

At the close of the poll the numbers stood — 

For Sandiford 205 persons, 261 votes. 

Smith 81 — 180—- 

124 81 

Supposed bad votes — 
For Smith 2, 



... % > 
...37, j 



Sandiford. * 35 35 

Leaves a real majority of 89 persons, and 46 votes in fa- 
vour of Sandiford. 



* Each person rated at any sum under £50, has one vote ; and at £50, 
and under £75, two votes 5 at £75, and under £100, three votes ; and so 
on until a person may give six votes, but no more. 



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HISTORICAL SUMMARY. 365 

Having given Everton's constabulary history from 
the year 1800 to the present time, an account of the 
manner of conducting public affairs, and of events 
that have occurred in the townsliip, must be continued 
in their regular order. The magistrates of the county, 
and generally the magistrate who resides nearest at 
hand, preside over the judicial affairs of Everton, so 
far as their magisterial powers extend ; but all matters, 
touching the general weal and local arrangements, 
are directed, managed, and ordered by the inhabitants 
at large. Parochial affairs and the surveillance of 
the highways, together with the laying of rates and 
raising the needful pecuniary supplies, to answer the 
exigencies of those matters, the inhabitants at large 
also govern, direct, and conduct, under the regulations 
and stipulations of the acts of parliament, in those 
cases made and provided. 

It is the custom, and has long so been, to call the 
inhabitants together on all cases of emergency, touch- 
ing the public affairs of Everton. On such occasions, 
they meet at the coffee-house, on the brow,* elect a 
chairman, and proceed to business, systematically and 
orderly ; and it has seldom happened that the results 
and final decisions of such meetings have been other 
than satisfactory: the public voice is forcible, and 
truth loves to unveil herself in large assemblies, where, 

* Previously to the town's-meetings being held at the present coffee- 
house, it was the custom of the inhabitants to meet at Boyd's, a public- 
house which was formerly kept by a person named Boyd, and stood where 
a good house is now erected, on locality 42, d, in Everton lane ; part of 
the old dwelling still remains, on the south. 



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3G6 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

in general, falsehood has so many eyes bent on her, 
that she is forced to slink away abashed and ashamed. 
This mode of conducting the legislative or municipal 
affairs of the township, may be all-sufficient at present; 
but as the population increases, the necessity of esta- 
blishing something that may be styled a managing 
municipal committee will be felt, and most likely will 
be effected. 

As to the executive or constabulary duties, those 
may and must be performed by adding, from time to 
time, consecutive recruits to that department; at 
present, Mr. Shaw seems to be quite competent, with 
the aid of one deputy, or assistant, to perform all the 
tasks and duties of his multifarious offices satisfactorily. 

There are certain fixed times when parishes and 
townships hold meetings, at which the inhabitants 
confer on, arrange, and expedite public affairs, — * 
that is, those of the township, the paupers, the county, 
and the highways. 

The business of the three first-named is transacted 
at Everton in public, at Easter ; whilst by the ordi- 
nances of certain acts of parliament, the public meet- 
ings on highway affairs, particularly as to the selection 
and recommendation of a person to serve as the next 
surveyor of the roads, must be held on the forenoon of 
the 22d day of September, each year; adjourned 
meetings may be, and of course generally are, subse- 
quently held, to arrange, settle, and pass the past 
year's accounts, and to determine on any point at 
issue, or matter in project, or progress. 



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HISTORICAL SUMMARY. 367 

The method of convening such meetings in the 
township of Everton is, to have a notice of the time, 
place, and nature of the proposed meeting read in the 
church, and also to have written notices of the same 
placarded on the church door, and on some conspi- 
cuous place on or near the house at which the meeting 
is to be held. Although almost invariably right and 
truth rule in the decisions of the assemblies that con- 
gregate occasionally to transact public business at 
Everton, yet individual views, partial interests, and 
private manoeuvring have sometimes, for a season at 
least, misled and abused the municipal congresses of 
the township; but the energy, honesty, discrimination, 
and spirit of some of the assembled parties, seldom fail 
to detect the fallacy, sophistry, and falsehood which 
intrigue or private policy may adduce ; such honesty 
and energy generally uncovers the cloven foot, and in 
the end clothes the resolutions of public assemblies 
in the garments of usefulness and propriety. It is 
acknowledged, however, that some improprieties of 
management have been tolerated, or looked over, 
which forbearance has emanated more from a spirit 
of pity than of justice; sometimes, indeed, such 
things have been permitted to pass without otlier 
penalty than proclaimed or implied censure, yet some 
measure is generally taken at the proper times to 
check attempts at, or chances of, future irregularity. 
In matters of expenditure, it would not be amiss to 
limit all officers, so that, without the sanction and 
approbation of the ley-payers at large, no officer what- 



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368 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

ever should be permitted to expend, on any one given 
object, more than a certain fixed sum. 

It may be as well to treat very briefly here of the 
taxatory concerns of Everton. With regard to those 
taxes that are raised under and by virtue of the 
powers of acts of parliament, little more of them can 
be noticed than what the table in the appendix states ; 
which shews their progressive increase and com- 
parative amounts, so as to display, at a glance, the 
great disparity betwixt the amounts raised at present, 
and those raised in days of yore. 

The county rate draws heavily on Everton ; in 1815 
the township was assessed for that rate at £9981 — 
last year its assessment for the county rate was £30139. 
It would be well if some cheaper mode of procuring 
safety and justice could be obtained : they are dear 
commodities at the present cost. 

The lighting and nocturnal watching of Everton are 
modern matters. About twenty-six years ago the late 
John Drinkwater and James Atherton, Esqs. made 
the experiment, on a limited scale, of having a few of 
the Everton roads lighted during the darJe-moons of 
the winter season ; the first named gentleman raised 
by subscription somewhere about £40, with which he 
commenced operations, and placed as many of the old 
darkness-made-visible lamps along a few roads, as the 
funds would permit; but there axe few documents 
preserved touching the earlier years of Everton's 
lamp-lighting. Some time about the year 1814, the 
late John Hind, Esq. consolidated the management, 



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HISTORICAL SUMMARY. 369 

and made the lamp-lighting of Everton a general and 
united concern ; he took pleasure and pride in direct- 
ing the operations, and most satisfactorily conducted 
the entire business; giving to the subscribers a printed 
statement of his receipts and disbursements at the end 
of every season, and faithfully accounting for his trust, 
all the duties of which he most meritoriously performed; 
and his system is pretty closely followed to this day. 
The progressive encrease in the expense of lighting the 
township of Everton may be immediately seen in the 
table given in the Appendix. It must be observed, 
that the late rise in the charge of lighting the town- 
ship is principally occasioned by the introduction of 
gas, in lieu of the liglit formerly produced from oil 
and wick ; but some places are still lighted by the old 
mode. It is to be observed, however, that the inha- 
bitants who reside in the vicinity of places lighted by 
gas, pay sixpence in the pound on their assessments, 
whilst others, whose vicinities are lighted in the old 
wick-and-oil way, pay only fourpence in the pound. 
It is highly to the credit of the inhabitants that, with 
few exceptions indeed, they voluntarily pay to the 
watching and lighting of the township; but it will 
shortly require the aid of an act of parliament to 
enforce and equitably regulate these matters at Ever- 
ton. 

About twenty years ago, a somewhat ludicrous 
event occurred, in consequence of the lack of lights in 
parts and places of Everton. One dark night, as 

Esq. and his sister were returning to their 

2b 



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370 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

dwelling on Everton-hill, from a visit tliey had been 
paying at Liverpool, their route lay along Fox-street 
and Great Homer-street ; when they had passed in 
perfect darkness so far as to judge themselves at the 
foot of Roscommon-street, they turned off suddenly 
to the east to ascend the hill, but, to their dismay, 
surprise, and discomfort, they marched knee-deep 
into a pond, which, in those days, lay at the west end 
of a road or opening on the south of Roscommon- 
street; of course the perambulators went to the 
" right-about," and marched out well soaked with wet, 
and shivering with cold; but on essaying a passage 
a little further north, they eventually reached their 
domestic haven : the pond went by the name of 

" 's bath" for many years afterwards; it has, 

however, been dried up for some time past The 
nocturnal watching of Everton is pretty general, yet 
the arrangements are numerous, and unconnected with 
each other : a few neighbouring streets unite together 
in raising a fund (which by the bye is now pretty 
generally collected by the high-constable)^ and with 
such fund, some of the inhabitants of each respective 
quarter, pay and requite the watchmen, who at the 
customary times, go their nightly rounds, call the hour, 
and to the best of their ability protect passengers and 
property. In some of the larger of these irregular 
districts there are two watchmen. There are no 
general or regularly printed documents issued to give 
statements of receipts and disbursements, touching the 
watching of Everton, but the direction is in hands so 



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HISTORICAL SUMMARY. 371 

respectable, that the contributors feel perfectly, satisfied 
as to the prudence and integrity of the management. 

About twenty-five years ago, an association was 
formed, and a fund raised, to prosecute offenders; 
some prosecutions were entered on, but probably 
through lack of support, or perhaps owing to want of 
energy in the parties interested, the object seems to 
have been lost sight of, if not altogether abandoned. 
Before taking leave of these subjects entirely, it 
ought to be stated, that the watching and lighting 
of Everton has doubtless saved a number of lives, 
and much property, from the attacks of ruffians and 
depredators. The damages sustained in the almost 
unexampled storm of January, 1802, have already 
been alluded to, and many ravages of tempests at 
Everton have been noticed in various sections where 
the scenes of such devastations occcurred. 

In the year 1803, the commander-in-chief of the 
district, Prince William, now Duke of Gloucester, 
fixed his head-quarters at St. Domingo-house ; thus 
following the example of Prince Rupert, he chose 
Everton for his temporary abode. Prince William 
was received and entreated with all the respect, 
honour, and attention due to his rank: the gentry 
near unto him were proudly anxious to vie with each 
other in proving to the prince, that trade and com* 
merce were not hostile to hospitality and courteous 
demeanor, nor, in many cases, to politeness and 
refinement of manner. The prince seemed perfectly 
satisfied with his mercantile and munificent neigh- 



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372 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

hours, and graced many a banquet at Everton with 
his presence. As the prince is the only. member of 
the royal family Avho has dwelt with us at Everton in 
modern days, it is hoped it may be permitted to give 
here the following copy of a memorandum that w r as 
made some little time after the prince left these parts. 

" Prince William of Gloucester is of manners cour- 
teous and urbane; during his stay at Everton, his 
intercourse with the neighbouring gentry was stamped 
just enough Avith real and requisite dignity, mixed up, 
at the same time, with much of suavity and cheerful 
good temper ; he was highly and generally respected 
and esteemed. At the time now treated of, the prince 
was a young man of superior personal appearance, 
possessing very agreeable if not handsome features, 
tolerable of stature, but of slighter make than the gene- 
rality of his royal cousins ; when he walked, it might be 
discovered that he was slightly -troubled with lameness, 
but when seated, or riding, he might lay claim to 
graceful appearance. The prince was unostentatious, 
addressing even the humblest, always courteously, and 
not unfrequently condescendingly ; with the upper 
classes he was at all times agreeably polite. 

" Could Lavater have studied the prince's features, 
he perhaps would not have considered them to index 
so much of sublimity, as of soundness, of intellect ; 
but there requires not a perhaps to state, that Lavater 
would have read, in the prince's physiognomy strong 
traits of good nature and goodwill to his fellow- 
creatures." 



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HISTORICAL SUMMARY. 373 

. If the prince, subsequently to his residence at 
Everton, has spoken against the slave-trade, such lan- 
guage has been dictated by his conscience, suggested, 
doubtless, by feelings of pure philanthropy; but most 
certainly it was not necessary, during his temporary 
sojourn among the African slave merchants of Liver- 
pool, that he should either preach sermons, or indulge 
in censorious remarks on that trade, which the laws 
of the land then sanctioned, but which is now most 
happily abolished. 

In the month of September, 1804, the prince 
received a visit from his father, the late Duke of Glou- 
cester, brother to his late most gracious majesty 
George the Third. Proud seemed the people of 
Everton to have the royal stranger among them, even 
for so brief a space. The late Duke, at the time of 
his visit to Everton, was an old man, whose frame, 
constitution, or system was evidently what is called 
."breaking up : " he sat his horse well, but there was 
a stooping forward, and a general appearance of debi- 
lity about him, which plainly told that old Time's 
scythe was veiy nearly making towards him that last 
and fatal evolution which, under Death's direction, is 
aimed, without distinction, at prince and peasant; the 
duke died soon after his visit to Everton. 

As before mentioned, it was in the year 1804 that 
the late Mr. Drinkwater made an attempt to have the 
old custom of walking the boundaries revived; he 
collected a posse of old and young, and had them 
led round the entire boundary lines ; the names of 



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374 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

the principal witnesses are recorded as follows : Win. 
Robinson, gent. ; Edmd. Mawdsly, gent.; Robt. Fos- 
ter, servant; Wm. Halliday, publican; Thomas 
Adamson, gent. ; and John Lyon, formerly constable 
of Evertoh ; all of whom are now living in the town- 
ship. 

From the year 1804, the affairs of the township 
continued to run so smoothly as to present no event 
that calls forremark, until, in the month of January, 
1809, the place was visited, and considerably damaged, 
by a storm ; no lives, however, were lost in the town- 
ship on that occasion. 

k In the year 1811, the people of Everton were much 
disturbed, not to say alarmed, at a report that govern- 
ment intended to establish barracks in the very heart 
of their hitherto quiet and delightful township: the 
place selected was St. Domingo ; but why so is inex- 
plicable; for St. Domingo-house was ill calculated 
commodiously to receive 'many of the common soldiery. 
Officers, indeed, would have found its conveniences 
little inferior to those of a palace ; but why the thirty 
statute acres of land forming that estate were required 
"puzzles comprehension." It may be that Prince 
Rupert and Prince William had, by their sojourns at 
Everton, stamped on the place a character of military 
fitness ; be that, however, ais it may, the project pro- 
gressed, and sorely were the peaceful and respectable 
inhabitants aggrieved ; meetings were called, and a 
deputation was sent from Everton to the proper 
authorities, in London ; common sense, prudence, and 



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HISTORICAL SUMMARY. 375 

even sound policy, were enlisted and sent in company 
with the Everton delegates, to the powers that then 
ruled British affairs; but they, together with the worthy 
delegates themselves, returned from their mission un- 
successful, disappointed, and chagrined : there was, it 
seems, stronger reasoning or greater interest behind 
the curtain, therefore, the St. Domingo estate was 
purchased for barrack purposes. It is stated here, 
for barrack purposes, but the purchase was never made 
effectively useful. 

To shew how much the people of Everton and its 
vicinity were alarmed and aggrieved at the idea of 
barracks being established at the St. Domingo estate"; 
the following concise and compressed account is given 
of the efforts and proceedings of the inhabitants of 
that and the neighbouring places. 

On the 27th November, 1811, a numerous meeting 
of the inhabitants of Everton and the neighbouring 
parts took place at the Everton coffee-house, to take 
into consideration a measure contemplated by govern- 
ment to purchase St. Domingo house and the lands 
of that estate, with an intention to convert the same 
to barrack purposes. The resolutidns passed at that 
meeting wfcre in substance as follows : 

"That the establishment of barracks at St. Domingo 
could be viewed in no other light than as an enor- 
mous grievance, likely to be injurious to property, and 
destructive of the Comforts of the neighbourhood. 

? That immense sums had been invested in forming 
valuable villas, near to the contemplated establishment. 



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376 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

"That the meeting had been assured by the pro- 
prietor of St. Domingo house and lands he was will- 
ing to forego the profit to arise unto him from the sale 
of that estate, and of his readiness to absolve govern- 
ment from the purchase thereof. 

"That the thanks of the meeting be conveyed to 
Wm. Ewart, Esq. for his consistent, disinterested, 
and honorable conduct. 

" That these resolutions be presented to the Honor- 
able Commissioners by Colonel Stanley, and that 
-copies be presented to the Commander-in-chief, the 
Right Honorable Spencer Perceval, the Earl of 
Derby, J. Blackburn, Esq., M.P., General Dirom, 
and the Mayor of Liverpool." 

Soon afterwards another meeting was held by the 
same class of persons at the same place, on which 
occasion W. Earle, Esq., (the chairman) stated " that 
the letters from Lord Derby and the members of 
Parliament were very cool, and not at all satisfactory, 
excepting that from Lord Stanley, who, it would appear, 
had taken some pains to persuade the barrack-board 
to relinquish their intentions at St. Domingo." 

A letter from Mr. Ewart was read, in which it was 
stated, that the bargain with government had been 
completed for £2&,383 6s. 8d., with leave for govern- 
ment to relinquish the bargain ; but Mr. Ewart hoped 
that the people of Everton would remunerate him for 
any loss of interest which he might sustain. 

A letter from General Dh*om was read, in which 
was stated, reasons why St. Domingo had been 



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HISTORICAL SUMMARY. 377 

selected for the intended purpose. The persons 
assembled at the meeting stated it to be their opinion, 
that St. Domingo had been selected on account of the 
splendid mansion erected on it. William Earle and 
William Statham, Esqs. were requested to proceed to 
London with the resolutions of the meeting, and also 
to state the value of the villas and lands about St. 
Domingo ; and they were desired to use their best 
endeavours to induce the barrack-board to alter their 
plan. 

A committee of the following gentlemen was 
formed, and Messrs. Byrom and Eyes were directed 
to make a plan of the township, and to estimate the 
value of lands and houses therein. 

COMMITTEE. 

Mr. Earle, Mr. Campbell, Mr. Bateman, 

Mr. Howe, Mr. Houghton, Mr. Harding, 

Mr. W. Appleton, Mr. Atherton, Mr. Lorimer, &c. 

Mr. Carson, Mr. Brown, &c. 

Mr. Robinson, Mr. Mather, 

Finally, a subscription was commenced, and eight 
or nine of the first-named gentlemen subscribed each 
thirty pounds. These efforts of the people of Everton 
and neighbourhood proved fruitless; barracks were 
established at St. Domingo ; but in a short time after- 
wards, government found the place either unfit or 
unnecessary for their purpose, for on the 4th January, 
1813, the late George Rowe, Esq., (in the absence 
of the chairman, W. Earle, Esq.) called a meeting of 
the inhabitants of the neighbourhood of St. Domingo 



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378 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

to submit to them , a proposal from government, that 
they should be permitted to re-purchase the premises 
bought from Mr. Ewart, on the terms of the original 
sale. On the 5th January, 1813, the parties called 
upon met, and declined to be purchasers on the terms 
offered by the barrack-department, and that board 
afterwards offered the premises at public sale. A few 
lots were sold within the year in which the offer wafc 
made, but not until somewhat recently have the com- 
missioners disposed of the whole, 
c With the view and hope to enliven, in some mea- 
sure, a dull theme, the following verses are inserted ; 
they are said to have been written -by the late Sil- 
vester Richmond, Esq. 

THE DAMES OF EVERTON TO WM. E T, ESQ. 

Come forth, all ye females of Everton-hill, 

Ne'er shall women be wronged, and their clappers lie still; 

Let us tell, one and all, these proud lords of creation, 

That we cannot submit to unjust domination : 

And unless they will straightway express their contrition, 

Maids, widows, and wives, all will counter-petition. 

A barrack, my girls, which these men think so frightful, 

Is just what we want — O a barrack's delightful ! 

We shall never stir out, be it good or bad weather, 

But quite certain to meet a cockade or a feather : 

And these terrible men, to our husbands alarming, 

So far from a bug-bear, to us are quite charming ; 

I'd give all Pm worth in the world, girls, by jingo! 

For a summer-night's ramble about St. Domingo. 

All the bands will be playing, the captains saluting, 

O ! such drumming and fifing, such fiddling and fluting ! 

And instead of a fusty old brown-coated varlet, 

We shall have, at command, a smart fellow in scarlet. 



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HISTORICAL SUMMARY- 379 

What a differenqe, .ye gods ! froiriian ale-drinking clown,< n 

Who quart after quart every night guzzles down ! 

Is the sot, who returns from the club half seas over, 

Fit to prove a kind husband, or make a good lover ? 

But the captain's all life; full of fire and politeness, 

With a beautiful hand of an exquisite whiteness, 

Gives a pressure quite gentle, but full of expression, 

And manoeuvres his eyes and fine teeth at discretion. 

Then he woos all our senses, in accents so tender, 

That, delighted, our hearts we with transport surrender. 

When spousy comes home, he does nothing but gorge ye 

With the rise of Sea Island, or fall of Bow' d Georgia ;,, 

Or else tells us in triumph, and makes a bravado, 

Of what money he gained by the last muscovado ; 

And sometimes exults — though you'd think it a quiz, — 

To see "ashes looks up, and because rums is riz." 

From such frograms lets turn to a prospect more dear, 

Embroidered huzzar, or the tall grenadier, 

Who always are ready by actions to prove 

That they bravely can fight, and with energy love. 

Then join, all ye damsels, who feel well .inclined, 

Let us tell Mr. E — t a piece of our mind, 

That if any longer our wishes are crost, 

In a blanket, ere long, he may chance to be tost ; 

For in spite of George Rowe, or the Colonel so brave, 

A barrack we like, and a barrack we'll have : 

Nor shall Statham's bright genius our faculties blind, 

Though supported by the double refined, 

A nc l fit for nothing I wot on 

*But chewing tobacco, and picking of cotton. . 
Then pray, Mr. E — t, sit down well contented, 
For women will not have their plans circumvented ; 
And in times like the present, believe it or not, 
Five thousand good pounds* are not easily got. 

In the year 1812, an event occurred which gave 

* The profit or gain by the sale. 



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380 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

greater brilliance, activity, and interest, than any 
scene or event that had ever previously happened at 
Everton. On the 12th August, 1812, Mr. Sadler 
ascended in his balloon from the Pilgrim-villa, at 
Everton. An account has been given, so correctly 
and explicitly, of this ascension, that it were scarcely 
possible to introduce a better version into these pages; 
the following, therefore, is extracted from Gore's news- 
paper of the 13th August, 1812. 

"The weather being uncommonly fine, an immense 
concourse of people assembled at Everton to witness 
the ascension of the intrepid Mr. Sadler. 

"Nothing could possibly exceed the grandeur of 
the scene ; the numbers of people .present could not 
have been less than 70,000, and amongst them were 
noticed the beauty and elegance of Liverpool and its 
environs. The balloon was inflated within an en- 
closed area, which was partitioned off into three divi- 
sions, into which upwards of 2000 persons were 
admitted at different prices. 

" The balloon commenced inflating at ten o'clock, 
and during the process a band of music from H. M. S. 
Princess attended. The inflation was completed soon 
after two p.m., and a little before three o'clock the 
ascent took place. 

" The balloon rose slowly, the effect was sublime and 
graceful; the aeronaut travelled in the south-east direc- 
tion, and descended safely in a field, at a short distance 
from Derby chapel." 

In the month of October following, Mr. Sadler 



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HISTORICAL SUMMARY. 381 

attempted to cross the Irish Channel, from Dublin to 
England, but fell into the sea, off the coast of North 
Wales; had he proceeded a few leagues farther, he 
might probably have descended in Everton ; he was 
picked up in safety by a Manx fishing-boat. 

The year 1812, was also remarkable at Everton, 
in the projection and commencement to construct the 
first church erected in the township, but of this under- 
taking the needful has been stated in the section of 
General Observations ; and some material matter on 
this subject will be found in the Appendix annexed to 
this treatise. The people of Everton have never been 
tardy in displaying their genuine loyalty and patri- 
otism ; on most great occasions they have promptly 
and cordially come forward, simultaneously with their 
neighbours, to express and demonstrate their joy at 
all national victories : it was on one of such occasions, 
in the year 1813, — the epoch of Bonaparte's first 
serious discomfiture, — that the people of Everton very 
properly determined not to continue the dangerous 
and disagreeable practice, usual on such occasions, of 
illuminating their houses; but in lieu thereof, they 
proceeded to raise a fund, to be chiefly expended in 
giving a brilliant display of fire-works, and whatever 
the residue might be to give unto the poor. Accord- 
ingly, in December, 1813, a notice, of which the 
following is a copy, was placarded in various parts of 
the township : — 

" Fire- works at Everton, in lieu of an illumina- 
tion. — The inhabitants of Everton give notice, that 



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382 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

they will manifest their participation in the general 
joy of the kingdom at the great and decisive victories 
that have been achieved by the arms of Great Britain 
over the common enemy, by a grand display of fire- 
works (in lieu of an illumination), to commence at five 
o'clock in the evening of Tuesday, the 14th instant, 
near the Everton coffee-house. 

"Everton, 9th December, 1813." 

At the appointed time, in the field which the north 
end of Shaw-street now intersects, the fire- works were 
exhibited, to the satisfaction of a vast body of specta- 
tors ; and the residue of the subscription was put to a 
much better .use, that of bestowing many a comfort to 
the poor, at that inclement season. 

In the year 1814, at a meeting of the inhabitants, 
it was ordered that a pinfold, with a cottage adjoining 
thereto, should be constructed at the north-east angle 
of the mere-bank ; and subsequently, it was ordered 
that the lord's rent and breck-silver should be paid 
out of the rent of the said cottage, as has been already 
stated in this treatise. 

In year 1815, it became necessary to have the 
paupers of the township mustered at the coffee-house^ 
and accordingly, on Whit-monday of that year, they 
were summoned by the constable of Everton, and 
appeared at the coffee-house ; but nothing remarkable 
accrued from the inspection, except, indeed, that the 
measure was the first step which led to the separation 
of Everton from the copartnery in the workhouse at 
Ormskirk. 



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HISTORICAL SUMMARY. 383 

Under the direction of Charles Okill, Esq., the 
boundaries of Everton were walked and examined, on 
the 13th November, 1816, and Mr. Okill performed 
his public duties so meritoriously this year, as to 
receive the thanks of the inhabitants : his method of 
numbering the vouchers produced at the examination 
of his public accounts is worthy of being followed by 
all public functionaries of Everton. To Mr. Richard 
Powell, in 1818, public thanks were also given, for 
his able conduct in office, as surveyor of the high- 
ways. • 

In the year 1817, various elaborate statements 
were entered in the town's book; touching the before- 
named separation of Everton from copartnery in the 
Ormskirk workhouse. The following are the names 
of the townships formerly concerned in the said 
establishment : 

1 Everton. 7 Melling. 13 Bretherton. 

2 Bootle. 8 Downholland. 14 Tarleton. 

3" Little- Crosbie. 9 Bickerstaff. 15 Simmonswood. 

4 Lidiate. 10 Latham. 16 Croston. 

5 Halsall. 11 Burscough. 

6 Maghull. 12 Scarisbrick. 

* ' f 

On the final arrangement of this separation, thanks 

were voted to the late John Hind, Esq. for his 
indefatigable exertions in the management of the 
tedious affair. 

In the same year, the inhabitants of Everton 
invited six of the neighbouring townships, viz., Wal- 
ton, Kirkdale, Linacre, Fazakerly, Litherland, and 



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384 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

Bootle, to unite with them in forming a place of general 
accommodation for the paupers of the above townships; 
but, to the several written applications of Everton, the 
township of Kirkdale only gave a written reply, which 
was a negative to the proposal; from the silence of 
the other townships, their dissent was also considered 
to be tacitly given. 

On the 22d January, 1818, the paupers of Ever- 
ton, viz., four women and two children, were removed 
from Ormskirk to the tOAvnship of Everton, with their 
wearing apparel, beds, and bedding, and the governor 
of the workhouse at Ormskirk was paid all charges 
that were due to that time. Ever since that period, 
and until the present, the in-door paupers have been 
lodged with Mr. John Lyon, whose late wife most 
kindly and assiduously did all in her power to soothe 
the pangs, and allay the bitterness, that generally 
attends pauperism. 

What would our ancestors and predecessors of a 
century ago have said to a law bill of £107 12s. 2d.? 
yet such a bill was paid on the township's account in 
the year 1819. But a much wiser measure was soon 
afterwards taken into consideration ; for in the same 
year encouragement was given to an able surveyor to 
take a survey, and draw an accurate map, of the town- 
ship ; Mr. W. S. Sherwood took the business in 
hand, and the fruits of his labour are a very clever 
survey, and a handsome chart or delineation of Ever- 
ton. The work is done by master-hands, both as to 
the survey itself, and the engraving thereof; and long, 



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HISTORICAL SUMMARY. 385 

very long, will Mr. Sherwood's map be highly prized, 
and found useful to all persons interested in the good 
old township. It is lamentable, however, to have to 
state, that the artist's time and talent were not pro- 
perly requited ; it is said, that in the result he lost by 
his labour, and very considerably so, although the 
township, in consideration of Mr. Sherwood's labour 
and ability, voted the sum of thirty guineas, which 
was paid to him from the township's funds : comment 
on such a result is unnecessary. This map was com- 
pleted and. published in the year 1821. The town- 
ship had formerly employed a person to survey Ever- 
ton, who accordingly did survey it, and with very 
considerable accuracy, as a comparison with Mr. 
Sherwood's map proves 5 but the plan of survey was 
never engraved, though many MS. copies of the map 
as then drawn up are still in existence : in one 
respect, the map of 1790 has a manifest advantage, 
for in that map, each separate lot in the township has 
its whole measurement marked thereon. 

Two inhabitants of Everton are annually chosen to 
fulfil the duty of assessing the township for taxation ; 
and it may be as well to state, that by a minute made 
20th March, 1824, a sum of £3 is directed to be 
paid to all future assessors of Everton — a measure 
highly proper, seeing that the assessors have to make 
one or more journeys to Prescot during the year of 
their assessorship. The time perhaps is not distant 
when steps may be again taken touching the mode of 
raising the parish church rate : it will be seen, in the 

2c 



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386 HISTORY OF EVERTON. 

Appendix, that some proposals were made, in the year 
1826, to alter the present mode of raising the money 
required for the parish church of Walton ; but it will 
be well to continue the present practice, so long as it 
can be legally sustained, otherwise Everton* s share of 
such leys will be enormous, when compared with the 
quotas that other townships would be called upon to 
pay, under the new or proposed mode, which differs 
little from that under which the county rates are at 
present raised. 

The history of Everton is now brought to a close, 
and it is probable that a long period may elapse ere 
another pen historically treats of this humble town- 
ship ; humble, no ! it has cast its humility aside, and 
is destined to bear a proud name, when tens on tens 
of thousands of human beings shall have domiciled 
themselves within its boundaries: anticipation pro- 
phesies that Everton will grow with the growth of 
Liverpool, and in after ages largely participate in the 
wealth and fame of that eminent commercial town. 



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APPENDIX. 



THE CUSTOMS OF THE MANOR OF WEST DERBY. 

" Henry, by the grace of God, King of England, &c, to the 
High Steward of the County Palatine of Lancaster, that now is 
or hereafter shall come, send greeting ; : 

" Know ye that by the advice of our council we of our espe- 
cial grace have granted unto our liege tenants of our towns of 
Darby and Wartree, that they and their heirs may have and 
hold their lands and tenements in our said towns for a reason- 
able fine to be made at every of their first entry thereof, accord- 
ing to the discretion of our steward there for the time being ; 
and that the heirs of our said tenants be not put out of their said 
lands and tenements for no stranger, if they will make a reason- 
able fine, at the discretion of our said steward for the time 
being; and we will and command you that you suffer our said 
tenants, and their heirs, to have and enjoy our said grant and 
grace, without making or suffering to be made or to attempt 
therein to the contrary of our aforesaid grant. Givennnder the 
seals of our Duchy of Lancaster, at our palace of Westminster, 
the 15th February, in the second year of our reign. 

"These are the customs granted by Lord William de Ferrers, 
late Earl of Derby, and afterwards by all other lords after him, 
being to his tenants of Darby and Wartree. First, it is lawful for 
every tenant of said towns to give or sell all their messuages, 
lands, and tenements in the aforesaid towns unto whom they will 
whilst they live, by witness of the steward or bailiff of the manor 
of the said towns, and in case that when and so often as any of 
the lands or tenements so sold, and whosoever doth buy the land, 



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388 APPENDIX. 

shall give unto the lord a fine at his entry for the same; and in 
case that any tenant shall sell any lands or tenements to one or 
other, and he will not restore the same to him that bought it, and 
if it be proved by the aforesaid steward and bailiff, he will be 
put in possession of the said lands and tenements in the court 
which bought the said lands and tenements, without any con- 
tradiction or let of him that sold the same; and in contrariwise, 
if said buyer will take any lands or tenements which he bought 
of any other tenant, he shall be put in possession in the court, if 
he that doth buy the same do reasonably agree with the steward; 
and in case that he cannot reasonably agree with the steward 
aforesaid, the lands and .tenements aforesaid shall then remain 
to him that sold it. And in case that if any land or tenement 
be in the hands of the sovereign lord the king after the death 
of any tenant, they shall not be forfeited into our sovereign lord 
the king's hands for ever, which were not taken at the first 
court, or at divers courts then next following. Likewise, such 
heirs which take such lands and tenements shall make fine 
according to the discretion of the steward, if it be found by 
inquisition before the same stewards taken. And it is lawful 
for every tenant of the aforesaid towns to fall and sell the wood 
and underwood growing upon the tenement in the aforesaid 
towns without licence of any of the lord's officers : and the 
said tenants shall not be charged to repair their houses, but 
according to their own will and pleasure. And if any land or 
tenement be sold by any tenant, and not taken at the first court, 
nor at divers courts then next following after letting or.demise- 
ing of the same, they shall not be passed into the lord's hands ; 
but they that shall take the same shall make fine according to 
the consideration of the steward, if it be taken by inquisition 
,before him. And if any tenant of said towns shall be sick, and 
*hall send for the bailiff of said towns to come unto him and to 
hear what a demise he will make of his said lands and tene- 
ments, or of any part thereof, and the said bailiff will not come, 
nor cannot be found at home, nor any other in his place and 



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APPENDIX. 389 

stead there being put, then it shall be lawful for said tenants of 
said towns to sell their lands or tenements unto whom they will, 
by witness of their neighbour of the said town ; and when and 
so often as any tenant shall sell any land or tenement unto any 
other, they shall make fine unto the lord. And in case that if 
any tenant shall sell any goods or chattels to any one or other 
dwelling in the towns aforesaid, and he doth say that the same 
payment shall be always paid by them at the form and at the 
usual terms of the said towns, and if it be behind and not paid, 
then it shall be lawful for the said bailiff the chattels of the 
said tenant not paid to empound until it be paid. And there 
is some land which shall not be taken in the court but by testi- 
mony "and witness of the bailiff, that is to say, oxland.* And 
if any land or tenement were let by any tenant to another, or to 
a stranger, and he which hath it cannot agree of fine, the said 
tenement shall be given unto him which had first delivered the 
same estate that was before letten. And if any exchange be 
made between the neighbours of the said towns of any lands 
equally, they shall not make fine unto the lord for the aforesaid 
exchange; and if any land or tenement of the aforesaid towns 
of any of the tenants be taken for their children, by the fathers 
or mothers, the said children, during their fathers' and mothers' 
lives, shall not possess the profits of said land or tenement. 
And if any wife have any land or tenement, she shall not take 
upon her any profit of the said land or tenement during her 
husband's life, without the goodwill of her said husband ; nor 
yet, she shall not challenge nor alien the said land or tenement. 
And there shall be holden, in Darby, two halmotts — and at the 
first halmott every tenant of the said towns shall make his ap- 
pearance. And know ye, that the father for the son, daughter, 
and wife may make answer; and likewise, the wife make answer 
for the husband. And at these two halmotts, all the lands and 
tenements which are bought and sold shall be entered and taken. 

* Supposed common or waste, open to all. 



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390 APPENDIX. 

"before the steward, the bailiff, and the tenants of the said towns, 
and not unto other courts. And no steward, nor bailiff, nor any 
other officer, shall possess any service nor perquisites of the 
tenant of the said town, without their goodwill. And if any 
tenant hold any land or tenement which are counted naughty 
land, those good lands shall not be sold nor let for worse, lest 
peradventure that naughty land do not suffice to sustain the 
fine. And if any tenant of the said towns shall be impleaded 
in any wapentake at the suit of any stranger, and he that is 
impleadeth doth deny by inquisition, the half of the inquisition 
shall be taken from the town where he remaineth impleaded. 
And no bailiff shall make any summons to any tenant of 
the said towns between any stranger parties complainant 
and defendant in any wapentake. And no bailiff of a 
wapentake shall gather any perquisites of the tenants of 
the said towns, but only upon their own goodwill. And 
know ye that the beasts of the said tenants of the said 
towns ought to feed in common pasture with their beasts in 
Woolton, Walton, Kirkby, Liverpool, Childwall, Huyton, and 
Roby ; and in contrariwise, as it hath been found by divers 
inquisitions taken before Rt. Pleasington, late chief steward 
unto John, late Duke of Lancaster. 

And if any tenant of the said towns shall be impleaded 
at the suit of any other tenant of a plea of debt, this is the 
duty of the fine-lands : * he which oweth debt shall not be at 
the law but at the inquisition." 

The following notes, which have been accidentally fallen in 
with in MS., are certainly more pertinent to the affairs of the 
township of Wavertree than of Everton, but there is some 
matter in these notes that may prove useful information to 
persons interested in the township of Everton. 

* that this manor of Wavertree is a distinct manor as well 

as township from West Derby, and hath its common separate 

* Or firm-lands, or farm-lands (the writing is difficult to be understood). 



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APPENDIX. 391 

and distinct (as Everton); appears from the following reasons, 
viz.: — 

"First, It hath meers and bounds, both of the inlands and 
wastes, which are, and by former perambulations have been, 
well known. 

" Secondly, Pays a distinct rent — and Wavertree holds a 
distinct and separate court from West Derby, and have their 
own jurors, and make their own orders, impose fines for misde- 
meanours done within their own manor, and have often pre- 
sented and fined the tenants and inhabitants of West Derby, as 
well as others, for getting gorse, &c. upon the common of Wa- 
vertree.* 

"Thirdly, That the constable and other officers of all the 
three towns are different — every town within itself, and have no 
power or authority in another. 

" Fourthly, That their leys and taxes are also distinct, and in 
every thing are divided, distinct, and separate from each other, 
as any remote towns or manors whatsoever — save only that 
West Derby and Everton hold but one court, and that the jury 
at every court are collected out of both townships, three out of 
Everton, and the rest out of West Derby." 



EXTRACTS FROM AN ABLE TREATISE ON COPYHOLDS, 
COURTS BARON, &c. 

"A manor consists of demesnes and services and a court- 
baron as incident, and this must be time out of memory ; for a 
manor cannot begin at this day, because a court-baron cannot 
now be made. The court-baron is the chief prop and pillar of 
a manor, for that no sooner faileth but the manor falleth to the 
ground. 

* "Everton hath not a separate court or separate jurors, but is joined 
with that of West Derby -, whereas the manor of Wavertree is distinct 
from both, and in a different parish." 



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392 APPENDIX. 

"A copyholder is tenant by the copy of court- roll, and is the 
only tenant in law who holds by the copy of any record, deed, 
or charter. The title or estate of the copyholder is entered into 
the roll, whereof the steward delivereth him a copy; from 
whence he is called a copyholder. 

"A copyholder originally had (in judgment of law) but an 
estate at will, yet custom had so established and affixed his 
estate, that this by the custom of the manor is descendible, and 
his heirs shall inherit it ; so that the custom of the manor is the 
life and soul of copyhold estates ; for without a custom, or if 
they break their custom, they are subject to the will of the lord. 
And by custom a copyholder is to have his land according to 
the custom, as he who had freehold at common law. 

"As a copyhold is created by custom, so it is guided by 
custom. 

"A copyholder doth not derive his estate out of the estate or 
interest of the lord only, for then the copyhold estate should 
cease when the estate of the lord determined ; but the copy- 
holder is in by custom. 

"A copyhold interest cannot be transferred by any other 
assurance than by copy of court-roll according to the custom, 
and that by surrender. 

"A surrender (where by a subsequent admittance the grant 
is to receive its perfection and confirmation) is rather a mani- 
festing the grantor's intentions, than a passing away any interest 
in the possession ; for till the admittance the lord taketh notice 
of the grantor as tenant, and he shall receive the profits of the 
land to his own use, and shall discharge all services due to the 
lord ; but yet the interest is in him, but secundum quid, and not 
absolutely; for he cannot pass away the estate to any other, or 
make it subject to any other incumbrance than it was subject 
to at the time of the surrender — neither is any manner of inte- 
rest vested in the grantee before admittance, for if he enters he 
is a trespasser and punishable in trespass, and if he surrender 
to the use of another this surrender is void. Yet the grantee 



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APPENDIX. .. 393 

cannot possibly be defrauded or deluded of the effect of this 
surrender ; for if the lord refuse to admit him he is compellable 
to do it by a subpoena in the chancery, and the grantor's hands 
are ever bound from the disposing of the land any other way, 
and his mouth ever stopped from revoking or countermanding 
his surrender. 

" A copyholder may surrender his copyhold by attorney, 
in case he be in prison, sick in bed, or beyond the seas, 
but he may not be admitted by attorney, because he must 
do fealty in person. And as in admittances upon sur-^ 
renders, so in admittances upon descents, the lord is used 
as a mere instrument, and no manner of interest passeth out 
of him, and therefore neither in the one nor in the other is 
any respect had unto the quality of his estate in the manor; 
for whether he hath it by right or by wrong it is not material, 
these admittances shall never be called in question for the lord's 
title, because they are judicial acts which every lord is enjoined 
to execute. 

" Admittances by the lord to a wrong person is void and of 
no effect ; and in such case the lord must make a second admit- 
tance which must be to the right person, and he will enjoy the 
estate, and the first have nothing. 

"The custom of every manor is compulsory in point of 
admittance : for either upon pain of forfeiture of their copyhold, 
or of incurring some great penalty, the heirs of copyholders 
are inforced to come into court, and be admitted according to 
the custom, within a short time after notice given of their ances- 
tor's death. 

" Custom is the very soul and life of copyhold estates, for 
without custom, or if they break their customs, they are at the 
lord's will. 

" An unreasonable custom, as for the lord to exact unreason- 
able fines for a tenant to cut down and fell timber trees, or the 
like, is void. 

"By the custom, the lord as chancellor in his own court 



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394 APPENDIX. 

may dispose of a copyhold estate when the tenant leaves it 
uncertain. 

" Under tenant, although he be but tenant for a year, yet 
he shall have all the benefits and privileges which the copy- 
holder himself might have, and he is distrain able for the rents 
and services due and payable to the lord ; for the charge lies 
upon the land, and not upon the person. 

" A custom which is contrary to the public good, or injurious 
to a multitude and beneficial only to some particular person,: is 
repugnant to the law of reason, and consequently void. 

" All customs shall in construction be taken strictly, and 
shall not extend beyond the words of it. 

' ( Any man once taken tenant in any tenement by the stew- 
ard of the court, in the presence of the homage, by the lord's con- 
sent, and having a copy, although by reason of the absence of 
the said lord the same be not signed, yet the tenant having such 
a copy shall enjoy the same according to the custom of the 
manor. 

" Every customary tenant, holding by copy of court-roll or 
otherwise, ought to pay his or her rents due to the lord of the 
manor annually, at a time fixed and certain. 

" The lord of the manor cannot take in and inclose any part 
of the common, and demise the same to any tenant, without 
the whole consent of the homage. 

t( The general custom allows a copyholder to make a lease 
for one year. 

** In most manors, if a copyholder hath leased out his copy- 
hold for more than a year and a day without the lord's licence, 
it is a forfeiture of his copyhold : or if for a lesser term he hath 
let it out to an under-tenant, and hath riot retained enough 
thereof in his own hands whereby the lord's dues may be fairly 
and justly answered, he is liable to be amerced.* 

* It is almost superfluous to add, that in most manors it is a forfeiture 
if a copyhold be transferred under a wrong denomination or tenure. 



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APPENDIX. 395 

" If any copyholder hath committed felony, and thereof hath 
been lawfully convicted, it is a forfeiture of his copyhold. 

' ' Where there is no custom to guide copyhold estates, they 
shall be directed by the rules of the common law. 

"If a copyholder die, his heir within age, the heir is not 
obliged to come to any court during his nonage to pray admit- 
tance or render his fine. Also, if the death of the ancestor be 
not presented, nor proclamation, it is not any detriment, al- 
though he be of full age. — Leon Rep. 1 par.fol. 128. 

" Copyholder may dig for marl without any danger of for- 
feiture, but he ought to lay it upon the same copyhold land. — 
Winch, p. 8. 

" Custom of a manor is; that if a copyhold descends to any 
man, that proclamation be made at three several courts, that he 
shall come in to be admitted ; and if he come not in, it shall be 
a forfeiture to the lord : yet an infant shall not be comprehended 
within this custom, for he by intendment of law is not at dis- 
cretion to make his claim. — 8 Rep. 100, LetcJiford's Case. 

* Common which was first gained by custom, and annexed 
to the customary estate, is lost when the copyhold is extinct 
and enfranchised. 

" If a copyholder accept a lease for years of his copyhold, by 
this his copyhold is destroyed, whether it be immediately from 
the lord or mediately — as was Lane's Case, 2 Rep. 16 6; for a 
copyhold interest, and an estate for years, of one and the same 
land, may not stand together, in one and the same person at 
one time, without confounding the lesser ; and if one of them 
ought to be determined, it ought to be the copyhold estate, 
which being customary only, is less than the estate at common 
law." 

It is absolutely incumbent on heirs, trustees, and devizees, 
to have themselves admitted, and take up their titles to Everton 
copyhold estates. And they ought to do so at the first oppor- 
tunity that reasonably offers itself. Purchasers and mortgagees, 
of course, should also see to the timely accomplishment of such 



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396 APPENDIX. 

matters, that is, at the first halmote court that may be held 
after the occurrence of transfer transactions ; and sometimes it 
will be prudent not to delay until the annual Whitsuntide 
courts are held, but rather to call special courts to serve the 
urgency of the occasion. 



EXTRACTS FROM AN ACCOUNT OF THE MANOR OF WEST 
DERBY. 

" The manor of West Derby consists of the manor and town- 
ship of West Derby and the townships of Wavertree and Ever- 
ton, wherein there are divers copyhold tenants, who do hold 
their copyhold lands to them and their heirs by copy of court 
roll, according to the custom of the manor, and by rent and fine 
certain, (that is to say) by the payment to the lord of the manor, 
upon every alienation or descent, one-third part of the ancient 
yearly rent, that is and always has been paid for the lands so 
aliened or descended, and no more : these fines are collected by 
the steward or his deputy upon the admittance of the tenant, 
and being but small are usually bestowed upon him for his 
pains in keeping the court and the rolls ; but the yearly rents 
of the copyhold lands in the townships aforesaid are of more 
value, and are a fee-farm belonging to the crown, and not long 
ago purchased by Sir John Worden, to whom they are yearly 
paid, and do, together with some small chief rents paid by 
several freeholders in the manor and township aforesaid, amount 
to £145 6s. 7d. or thereabout ; but it is said there is a deduc- 
tion of £40 out of said £145 6s. 7d., and deducted from Sir 
John Worden, which is due to the lord of the manor for the 
time being." It goes on to state, among other things, that 

" In West Derby there are 1 8 tenants, who pay ( 1 3 hens included)£4 3£ 

In Wavertree 16 ditto, ditto ditto 5 5 2 

In Everton 20 ditto, ditto £300? 

and for 16 hens.. 8 0> 3 8 

What follows seems to be dry matter for a law brief. There is 



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APPENDIX. 397 

no date in the body of this paper, and the latter part of the 
portion above given is somewhat vague and indefinite ; there is 
however, in another hand, an endorsement on the paper which 
bears date 1720. 



The king's "fifteens/' or "fifteenths/ 5 and " subsidies/ 5 are 
two of the oldest rates in the kingdom, and were superseded by 
the land-tax acts of parliament. Fifteenths are named in Mag- 
na Charta as a concession to the king of one-fifteenth of their 
moveable goods, &c. In the course of time difficulties arose in 
the collection of the fifteenths, and they dwindled down in the 
amounts collected, from £120,000 to £70,000; at length the 
land-tax abrogated and superseded the fifteenths altogether. 
Everton paid 14s. to the king's fifteenths. For particulars, 
touching these and other leys, see Gregson's "Fragments of 
Lancashire." 



The following is copied from the Mercury newspaper of 1825, 
viz. — "In 1066, the lands in Lancashire, lying between the 
rivers Ribble and Mersey, yielded to the crown £145 2s. 2d., 
and to the thanes £4 14s. 8d. (the pound was then equal to 
£110 of the present money;) in 1814, the same lands were 
assessed at £2,569,761." It may be added that the rate for the 
county was £3,106,009 in 1815, and £4,214,634 in 1829. 



COPY OF AN OLD DEED IN POSSESSION OF S. ELLISON, ESQ. 

. " To all Christian people to whom these presents shall come, 
or the same shall see, hear, read, or understand, I, Thomas 
Greaves, of Everton, in the county of Lancaster, yeoman, son and 
heir of Richard Greaves, of Everton aforesaid, yeoman, deceased, 
do send greeting to the Lord God everlasting, Whereas I, the 
the said Thomas Greaves, and Jane, now the wife of me the 



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398 APPENDIX. 

said Thomas Greaves, by a written surrender by me formally 
granted and acknowledged without the court, according to cus- 
tom of the manor of West Derby, surrendered into the hands 
of the lord of the said manor all and singular those closes, 
closures, crofts, and parcels of land herein hereafter mentioned 
and expressed, situate, lying, and being in Everton aforesaid, 
that is to say, the two Mosses, and the Ryecroft, or by what 
other name or names they or any of them be called or known, 
containing in the whole by estimation two acres and a half of 
land or thereabouts, be they more or less land, customary the 

acre and some time heretofore of the customary inheritance 

of the said Richard Greaves, together with all singular ways, 
water, entries, passages, profites, and commodites whatever to 
the aforesaid closes, closures, crofts, and parcels of lands belong- 
ing or in anywise appertaining, with all and singular their 
appurtenances, to the use and behoof of Edward Williamson, of 
Liverpool, in the said county of Lancaster, mercer, his heirs and 
assigns for ever, under and upon certain provisos, conditions, 
and agreements in the said surrender contained, as in and by 
the aforesaid surrender, provisos, conditions and agreements 
(relation being thereto* had) more plainly and at large may 
appear. Now, know ye that I, the said Thomas Greaves, for 
divers good causes and considerations me moving, and especially 
for and- in consideration of fifteen pounds of lawful English 
money already paid unto me, the said Thomas Greaves, by the 
aforesaid Edward Williamson, before the sealing of these pre- 
sents, whereof and wherewith I the said Thomas Greaves do 
acknowledge and confess myself fully satisfied, contented, and 
fully paid. And thereof, and of every part or parcel thereof, do 
clearly acquit, exonerate, and discharge the said Edward Wil- 
liamson, his heirs, executors, administrators, and assigns, and 
any of them, for ever ; by these presents have demised, released, 
and perpetually quit claim ; and by these presents, for me and 
my heirs, do remit, release, and perpetually quit claim unto the 
said Edward Williamson, his heirs and assigns for ever, all and 



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APPENDIX. 399 

singular the provisos, conditions, and agreements in the afore- 
said surrender mentioned or contained, and all the benefits 
and advantage of me the said Thomas Greaves thereby received; 
and also all the right, estate, title, use, interest, claim, and de- 
mand of me the said Thomas Greaves, of, in, and to the afore- 
said closes, closures, crofts, and parcels of land, called the two 
Mosses and the Ryecroft. And of, in, and to the, and to all 
and singular other, hereditaments and premises before men- 
tioned to be surrendered, with their appurtenances, so as neither 
I the said Thomas Greaves, nor my heirs, nor any of us, shall 
or may at any time or times hereafter have or challenge to have 
any right, title, interest, claim, or demands of, in, or to the afore- 
said closes, closures, crofts, or parcels of land, and other the 
hereditaments and premises before mentioned to be surrendered, 
with their appurtenances, or of, in, or to any part or parcel 
thereof. But shall, of, and from all and every accon. of right, 
title, claim, interest, or demand of, in, or to the same, or any 
part or parcel thereof, be from henceforth excluded and barred 
for ever by these presents. 

" In witness whereof I, the said Thomas Greaves, have here- 
unto put my hand and seal, the 18th day of July, in the year 
of our Lord God 1549. 

" Thomas Greaves, his x mark." 



COPY OF AN ORDER FOR ONE SOLDIER TO BE PROVIDED 
BY EVERTON. 

« Ormskirk, I 25th Ja 1671 

County Lancaster.^ 

" Whereas the town of Everton was formerly charged with 
the making and providing of two foot soldiers, whereby the 
inhabitants complayne that they are overcharged, and whereas 
it appears to us by the survey of Mr. Thomas Burn, John 
Whitcliff, and Thomas Moorcroft, that the said town is but of 



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400 APPENDIX. 

the yearly value of £55 2s. ; we therefore order that the said 
town of Everton from henceforward be but charged only the 
providing of one of the said soldiers with arms and other furni- 
ture. Given under our hands, the day and year above said, 

" Edward Fleetwood. 

"William Banks." 



DOCUMENTS AND OBSERVATIONS TOUCHING 115 ACRES OF 
LAND LEASED IN 1716, BY THE LORD (AND TRUSTEES OF 
THE LADY) OF THE MANOR, TO THE COPYHOLDERS OF 
EVERTON. 

Previous to the execution of above lease, a survey of the 
Everton commons was made by James Corless : viz. — 

A. R. p. 

That part below the Beton A 22 3 12 

The middle between the two ways pointing to 

the Beton B 13 19 

That part where the watering pool is C 8 1 20 

That part that lieth to Walton-cop D 11 35 

The narrow part below the enclosure E 1 1 13 

That on the left hand from Everton to Derby ... F 15 2 36 
That on the right hand of same road G 43 12 

115 2 27 



The lease being completed, the copyholders of Everton 
parcelled out the leased lands according to each his copyhold 
estate in Everton, and in the year 1729 a "particular allotment 
of the land leased for 1000 years in 1-716," was done by John 
Eyes. 

The figures on the left denote the quantity of copyhold or 
old land owned by each individual ; the figures and italic let- 
ters on the right hand are attempts to identify the lots with the 
localities of the map of the year 1790; and the capitals refer to 
Mr. Corless's survey. 



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A. R. P. 

25 2 26 



APPENDIX, 

Henry Halsall had allotted to him of new land, viz. 
A. R. p. 

close by Hill-side* 6 26 

. . Hongfield 3 20 

Beacon-north ..10 1 38 
.. Rake-lane-end .. 6 20 
. . Guffot's-hey 35 



16 3 7f 



26 



2 



401 



A 8 a, 24 c, &44a. 
F 17 i. [and L 
B 2c y d,e,f,g, ft, 
G 1 y, and z. 
Gl t. 



26 19 



ohn Seacome allotted him — 

close by the Mere 3 25 

Beacon 2 2 22 

Coulson's 1 21 

George Croft . . 3 21 

Livesley 3 2 

Rice 29 

R. Seacome .... 1 6 

Hongfield 3 1 4 

Sleeper's-hill ..3 1 6 
Hongfield-bottom 19 
Halsall's-close .. 1 33 
John Johnson . . 1 27 



George Heyes allotted him — 
close by Greaves 1 



Mere 

Beacon 

Hill-side 

Widdowson's . . 
Whitefield, (5, 4) 
Sleeper's-hill . . 
End Whitefield . 
Butter-holes .... 3 
Bottom-hongfield 



Hongercroft, (38, } 



2, and 11 perches ) 



C 16/. 

A 2 o, and p. 

A 50 a, and most 

F [likely 68 a. 

G24e, and/. 

A 61 a. 

F 16 e y and 15 e. 
D 15 b. 
E 16 c. 



18 2 13 



I 

3 22 
1 27 
23 
3 8 
9 
33 
28 

8 

1 11 



C 19 i. 




A 2 m, 


and n. 


A 46 a. 




A 15 a. 




G 




D 15 a. 




G 15 w 




G 15 *. 




E 15 c. 





11 1 10 



araes Johnson allotted him — 

close by Hill-side 1 36 

. . at his house 2 12 

.. by Whitefield 00 3 



1 11 



A 21. 

G 40 a. 
F 



2 22 



54 2 19 Old land. 



58 24 Leased land. 



* In the original lease the acre is styled of the " large measure there used." 
♦ Another account gives 18a. Or. 9p. 

2d 



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402 APPENDIX. 

A. R. P. A. R. P. 

54 2 19 Old land brought forward. 58 24 Leased land do. 

6 2 William Williamson allotted him — 

A. R. p. 

1 close by Hill-side 2 2 28 . . A 4 a, and 9 a. 

I .. South-hongfield 12 18 .. ¥ \1 h. 

1 .. Hongercroft 11 .. F 

2 .. Whitefield, (9,18)0 27 .. G 16 k. 
1 .. Round-hill .... 1 3 36 .. G 14 a. 

6 2 

4 1 John Johnson (Everton) allotted him — 

1 close by Comer hey .... 2 21 23 c. 

1 . . Butter-holes 2 5 

1 .. Hill-side 13 2 12 e. 

4 1 28 

5 2 Samuel Plumpton allotted him — 

I close 5 2 0G 18 rf, and 18 <». 

5 13 William Rice allotted him— 

1 close by Hill side 1 26 

1 .. South-hongfield. 1 1 4 

1 . . Bottom do 15 

I .. Whitefield 13 

1 .. Butter-holes.... 2 2 6 



5 



4 1 Thomas Cliffe allotted him— 

1 close by Hill-side 2 35 

I .. Butter-holes.... 2 5 

4 1 

62 John Johnson (Liverpool) allotted him — 
1 close by Kirkdale land .. 3 2 10 

1 . . Hill-side 1 2 21 

1 . . Kennyon's-house 1 1 27 



3 1 Mary Fabious allotted her — 

1 close by Kenny on's 1 30 

1 . . Kirkdale 2 10 



6 2 



3 1 



A 


27 a. 




F 


20 g. 


/ 


E 


21 b. 




G 20 t. 




G 20 e, 
24 


and/. 


A 






G 




17 I. 




B 2 a, and b. 


A 






F 
18 


45 a 


and b. 


E 


21 e. 




A 




33 a. 








2 1 26 John Pyke allotted him — 

1 close by South-hongfield 2 2 4 F 17 k. 

2 Anthony Molyneux allotted him — 

1 close by Newsham-lane 20 0G 

3 OR. Johnson and Tarlton, and J. Tarlton allotted them- 

1 close by Butter holes 10 G 14 a. 

1 .. Hongfield 14 E 15 f. 

1 . . Butter-holes 10 G 24 d. 

I .. Headless-cross ..031 C 



3 5 



97 1 18 Old land. 101 1 23 Leased land. 



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APPENDIX. 403 

A. R. P. A. R. P. 

97 I 18 Old land brought forward. 101 1 23 Leased land do. 

10 Thomas Henshaw allotted him — 

1 close 10 

f 2 R. Seacome allotted him — 

1 close 20 8F 

2 Thomas Phithian allotted him— 

1 close 2 

2 William Harrocks allotted him— 

1 close 02 

2 Matthew Gleave allotted him— 

1 close 02 

10 32 John Rose allotted him— 

1 close by his barn 2 29 

I . . Hill-side 2 20 A 

1 .. Mere 2 6 C 

1 . . Round-hill 2 3 G 

1 . . SleeperVhill . . 2 2 17 D 
10 32 



112 10 Total old land. 116 23 Total leased land. 



On the 17th July, 1715, the copyholders signed articles of 
agreement, fairly and equally to divide the lands contracted 
for* to be leased for 1000 years (receiving to the extent of 
their respective copyholds ;) and each party agreed to pay his 
respective share of the twenty shillings per acre money down, 
and afterwards one shilling per acre annual rent. 

John Seacome, John Rose, John Johnson, 

Henry Halsall, John Johnson, Daniel Fabious, 

Thomas Heyes, Edward Rice, his X Ralph Seacome. 
Rowland Johnson, mark. 

* The contract was made in 1714. 



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Thomas Speakmai 
Thos. Dickenson 
Charles Matthews 
Thos. Dickenson 
Thomas Wiatt .. 
Edward Rogerson 

Ditto 

Edwd. Rogerson 
Edward Turner.. 
Edwd. Rogerson 


John Lyon 

John Lyon ....;. 
Joseph EUinthorp 
John Drinkwater 
John Drinkwater 
Ellis Lorimer. . . . 
George Goring . . 
William Robinson 
Thomas Reeve . . 


John Pyke 

John Hinde 
William Harding 








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408 



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410 APPENDIX. 

(PAPER IN TOWN'S CHEST MARKED No 79.) 

" 14th June, 1723. Mem. At a meeting at Mary Dale's, 
Low-hill, hy the trustees for West Derby and those for Ever- 
ton, to compromise a dispute touching the commons at Breck, 
it was demanded by the West Derby trustees : — 

a 1. 16 acres of said Breck, as once granted to Mr. Roper, to 
belong to and be in West Derby, or £20 per acre to be paid 
in lieu thereof. 

" 2. Whereas the tenants of Everton had enclosed all said 
Breck lands except about &\ acres, and that they could not 
conveniently yield the land on the terms demanded, it was 
proposed by the trustees for Derby to accept so much as is 
uninclosed in part of said 16 acres, and to be paid £20 per 
acre for so much as shall make that up 16 acres. 

" 3. They demand that Everton agree to give up part land 
and part money, that the whole 16 acres shall be esteemed as 
land lying within West Derby, to be set out and bounded 
by mere stones, and shall pay tithes and taxes with Derby; 
but agree that what ]and Everton pays for shall be held by the 
tenants of Everton, pursuant to their lease thereof. 

" 4. They propose to allow Everton, out of the £20 per acre, 
the fine paid for the whole 10 acres, and to pay for future 
lord's rent for so much as shall be allowed them in land. 

" 5. If Everton agrees, articles shall be drawn up, the money 
paid in six months from the date of the articles. 

" 6. They propose said articles to release, &c, all future claims 
to said commons called Breck, or any part thereof, or to any 
common of pasture, or other right there whatever. 

" Everton required time to consider above proposals, and on 
23d June, 1723, at a meeting at Child wall, the trustees of 
Everton agree and consented as follows : — 

" Everton agrees to allow and yield to Derby all that part of 
said Breck lying open and uninclosed before Mr. Livesley's 
house and John Litherland's, from Rake-lane and to Walton- 
lane end, containing 5 £ acres, to free and clear from any fine to 



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APPENDIX. 



411 



be paid or allowed by Everton — Derby only to pay the future 
lord's rent for the same. 

" 2. Everton agrees to pay to Derby £200 for the remainder 
of the said 16 acres inclosed by them, free from all demands, 
or allowance of any fine to be paid for the same. 

" 3. They agree that the remainder of said 16 acres, enclosed 
as aforesaid, shall be as land lying within West Derby, and 
shall pay tithes and taxes with Derby, though held by the 
tenants of Everton by virtue of their lease, &c. 

"4. They agree that Mr. Green be desired to draw articles 
on these heads with all convenient speed, and to pay the said 
£200 to the said trustees, at six months after perfecting the said 
articles, by the said trustees, or a majority of the whole. 



" 1763. The township of Everton to West Derby, 



Dr. 






Cr. 




To 16 acres of land at 






By 6\ acres assigned to 




£20 #- acre £320 








them in land £102 10 





„ Leys and taxes for 11 






„ The fine for 1 6 acres 




acres at 2s. $- acre 1 


2 





to be allowed .... 17 
„ Exemption from rent 
of 5\ acres assign- 
ed as above 5 

„ Taxes for ditto.... 10 
„ Balance 200 16 

£321 2 





10 2 


£321 


2 









"The sum of £453 6s. was raised (by a ley of £4 per acre) 
30th June, 1724, to pay all expenses touching this lease. 



Henry Halsall £102 13 

John Seacome 72 4 6 

John Rose 40 16 

George Heyes 40 13 

William Williamson.. 26 

Samuel Plumpton .... 22 

William Rice 20 6 6 

James Johnson 8 

Thomas Cliffe 17 

John Johnson, Senior 26 

Mrs. Fabions 13 



JohnPyke 9 13 

A. Molyneux 8 

Johnson and Tarlton .. 12 

Thomas Henshaw .... 400 

R. Seacome 8 

Matthew Gleave 2 

Thomas Phithian .... 200 

W. Harrocks 2 

J. Johnson, Jun 17 



£453 6 0" 



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412 APPENDIX. 

The original lease referred to at page 400, was signed by the 
following persons : — 

John Seacome, Edward Rice, his X mark, John Pyke, 

Henry Halsall, John Johnson, Thomas Henshaw, 

Rowland Johnson, Thomas Cliffe, Elizabeth Seacome, 

Thomas Heyes, John Johnson, Ra. Seacome. 

Note. — I havebeen induced to mark several of the allotments in 
the document drawn up by Mr. John Eyes, (p. 401, et seq.) with a 
figure or figures, and italic letters of reference to the map given 
in this work. The references will be found correct in the main, 
and will serve, in some measure, to identify and connect known, 
and now existing, parcels of land with the original allotment of 
the lands leased in 1716. The capitals shew in which quarter 
of Mr. Corless' survey the lands allotted in 1 729 lay. But it is 
presumed Mr. Corless has not placed the portions of land 
correctly in the several quarters he points out, for his state- 
ment differs from Mr. Eyes' ; for instance, — Mr. Eyes places 
upwards of 28 acres below the beacon, but Mr. Corless gives 
the measure of that quarter only 22a. 3r. 12p. 

Although I have attempted to reconcile, in some degree, the 
two documents, it is not recommended that they should be con- 
sulted on nice questions touching what are now stated to be lease- 
holds ; such questions will be best elucidated by consulting the 
table of tenures which follows the map attached to this work ; 
where all leaseholds (known to exist at present) appear in their 
proper order. It would be impossible to trace all the original 
leasehold lots down to the present possessors. The ancient 
public officers of Everton were very neglectful of their duty in 
collecting lord's rent and breck- silver ; but the 1 15 acres of land 
were leased in 1716 to the copyholders at large, or as a body ; 
therefore the township was, and still is, bound to pay the lord 
his lease rents and breck-silver. It has been the custom to 
pay those dues annually out of the town's leys, the officers at 
their pleasure calling, or not, on each individual lessee for 
his proportion : but of late an excellent plan has been adopted, 
and they are now paid out of the rents of a cottage and pinfold 



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APPENDIX. 



413 



near the mere. That very circumstance imposes the necessity 
of framing a table of the leaseholds, for the rate not being now 
collected, matters will become more mystified; therefore it is 
now the time to put them into something like a tangible shape, 
and it is hoped some advance has been made in the accom- 
plishment of this in the tables affixed to this work. 



Three ley-lists, &c. are here exhibited, to shew the slenderness 
of the population and the lowness of value of the township of 
Everton at the times these leys were laid, as compared with the 
present state of the township's population and value. 

1692. 



Rentally of Everton, &c. for year 1692. 



William Halsall £15 8 

William Rice 5 5 

James Harrock 3 

James Whalleys 3 3 

Everton breck-silrer . . 13 4 

Humphrey Hey (or Hoy) 4 4 
William Williamson, 

for sheepfield .... 3 9 

Ann Johnson 3 6 

John Seacome, son of 

R. S 1 

John Pike 2 5 

Henry Carter 4 3 

Robert Johnson 4 3 

Thomas B. Johnson . . 10 

Richard Goodber .... 6 

Thomas Hey 3 5 



Jane Williamson .... 

Elizabeth Woods 

Thomas Williamson . . 

John Seacome 

Thomas Smalley .... 

Thomas Huyton 

John Johnson 

Richard Rosse 

John Henshaw ...... 

Robert Leman 

Daniel Fabious 

R. Seacome 

Henry Merids 

Elizabeth Hoyl 



6 
3 
3 


2 
6 

H 





3 

9 

3 

7 



In original added to 

£5 19 8 is £6 4 8" 



1714. 

"A ley lade of fore pence every of the acre, and upon housfs 

and land in Everton, as folloth. 

Henry Halsall £0 11 

Thomas Heyes 5 

Rowland Johnson .... 4 

Thomas Wilson 4 

John Seacome, Jun. . . 4 



3§ 
5 


Rit. Roase 






4 3$ 
2 10 


Benjamin Milton .... 


9 


William Rise 





2 11 


8 


Robert Johnson 





2 3 


6 


Samuel Plumpton .... 





2 2 



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414 



APPENDIX. 



Thomas Honghall .... 022 

Thomas Slifts 2 1 

Humphrey Hey (or Hoy) 15 

Margaret Seacome .... 1 4| 

John Johnson 1 2 

Margaret Pike 1 2 

Danl.Foboyg(Fabious) Oil 

EllenHawkes 9 

Peter Doueg 1 6 

Thomas Swift 8 



Robt. Seacome (or 7 id.) 9| 

Thomas Disley 4 

Mrs. Heyes 3 

Ellen Rise 2 

Mary Smoult 2 

William Stargon .... 2 

Elizabeth Mager .... 1 

H. Mager. 9 



£3 1 4£" 



*1718. 
: A ley for the pay of the wall for the Breck. 



Samuel Plumpton £0 6 10 

Anthony Molyneux . . 2 6 

Henry Halsall 1 12 1 

William Williamson . . 8 If 

Mary Williamson .... 10 3$ 

Robert Johnson 5 3£ 

ThomasCliffe 5 3| 

M. WoolfaU 5 7 

Thomas Heys 12 8§ 

Thomas Henshaw .... 1 3 

Row. Johnson (or 6s. 3d) 9 3 

JohnPyke 3 Of 



John Rose 13 4 

Edward Rice.. 6 5 

John Seacome 10 8 

John Seacome, Jun. . . 11 

Daniel Fabious 4 

Matthew Gleare 1 

William Harrison .... 7£ 

Jeremiah Cooke 3| 

John Johnson 4 4§ 

Ra. Seacome 3| 



£7 4 3" 



Taking the names as they appear in 1692 and 1714, as the 
heads of families, and giving to each family five inmates, the 
population would be — for 1692, 135 persons, and for 1714, 140 
persons : these numbers may probably be somewhat over the 
mark, as perhaps some, but very few, of the landholders might, 
at the time treated of, not reside in the township ; it is thought 
best, however, to give here the probable extreme population, 
which nevertheless, numerically, little exceeded, at these se- 
lected epochs, the number of inhabitants dwelling at Everton 
at the time Doomsday-book was compiled. 

* These are not all the inhabitants who dwelt at Everton in 1718; 
the ley was laid for a partial purpose, on copyholders (or land-hold- 
ers) only. 



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APPENDIX. 415 

GOVERNMENT ASSESSED TAXES. 

1790.. £560 1820.. £4341 0* 1825.. £3759 0* 

1815.. 3422 8 8 1821.. 4716 0* 1826.. 3902 0* 

1817.. 3729 16 4 1822.. 4664 0* 1827.. 4053 0* 

1818.. 4019 10 10* 1823.. 4210 0* 1828.. 4287 0* 

1819.. 4471 0* 1824.. 3436 0* 1829.. 5262 0* 

Whittaker, in his " History of 40 miles round Manchester," states 
that West Derby pays -n& of county rate. 

County rate assessment of Everton in — 

1815 was £9981— at Id. in the pound, raised £41 11 9 
1829 is 30139 — at Id. in the pound, raises 125 11 7 

RENTAL OF EVERTON. 

In 1066 (as Doomsday-book evidences) the township was exempt from 
Danegelt. 

In 1671 the rental of Everton was £55 2 

In 1769 do. do. 2209 11 6 

In 1815 do. do. 9981 

In 1829 do. do. < 30139 

POPULATION OF EVERTON. 
In 1327 there were in Everton 19 nativif — taking these families 



In 1692 tl 


lere we 
do. 
do. 


ire . . . 




135 „ 


In 1714 






140 


In 1769 


46 inhabited houses 253 


In 1790 


do. 
do. 


67 

87 


do. 
do. 


370 „ 


In 1801 


190 males and 309 females 499 „ 


In 1811 


do. 


140 


do. 


328 do. 585 do. 913 „ 


In 1815 


do. 


188 


do. 


at 6§ souls to a house is . . 1222 „ 


In 1821 


do. 


320 


do. 


760 males and 1349 females 2109 „ 


In 1829 


do. 


579 


do. 


at 6§ souls to a house is . .3763 „ 



To afford comparison, the following brief abstract is given from a 
table of Liverpool's population and parish rates : — 

* These are the sums on which a poundage of 3d. in the pound has been paid, 
by the Receiver-general, and were collected between the 5th April of one year, and the 
5th April oi the succeeding year. . 

+ Or heads of families, holding 24 oxgangs of land, which, at 13 acres each oxgang, 
gives 312 acres. 



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416 APPENDIX. 

1682, Population of Liverpool — 

4500, and there was raised that year for the poor, £8 

1700, Ditto, 5700, do. do. £60 2 4 } 52 9 4* 

And for clothes, 2 7 0^) 

1711, Ditto, 8168, do. do. 350 

1721, Ditto, 12000, do. do. 900 

1821, Ditto, 118972, do. do. 54221 

In 1 821 the parish leys in Liverpool were equal to 9s. 1 d. each inhabitant. 
In 1821 do. in Everton were equal to 7 3 do. 

In 1821 £35296 was expended on the poor, or equal to 5s. lid. each inha- 
bitant of Liverpool. 
In 1821 £245 10s. 2d. was expended on the poor, or equal to 2s. 3d. each 
inhabitant of Everton. 



ANNALS OF EVERTON. 

BEING ABSTRACTS, IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER, OF THE BY- 
ENACTMENTS AND TRANSACTIONS OF THE INHABITANTS 
OF THE TOWNSHIP OF EVERTON, DURING THE LAST 100 
YEARS. 

1733 A ley of 8d. per acre, laid on all improved lands of 

Everton, for church, poor, and highways, raised 
£7 Is. Id.* 

1 734 The beacon was repaired by the township. 
1736 The cock of the dial repaired. 

1741 The boundaries were walked. 

1744 Spent on six journeys to Prescot, to meet the commis- 
sioners about the Papists, 6s. 

— Spent at three times searching every Papist in town, 

Is. lOd. 

— Paid for the purchase of the workhouse, £5. 

— Paid for cleaning town's arms, 2s. lOd. f 

1746 Spent on the paviours, when they began to pave the town. 

— Paid Croft Williamson for the town's musquet. 

* This gives rather more than 211 acres, 
f Query, if in anticipation of the rebellion ? 



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APPENDIX. 417 

i746 Paid for expenses when returned Bible Caites, Is. 6d. 

1749 All the town's papers ordered to be collected and placec\ 

in some chest, to be provided with three locks, one key 
to be in possession of executor of Mr. Halsall, one of 
George Heyes, and one of John Johnson, Jun. ; the. 
inhabitants to have power to call for the keys, but the 
chest not to be opened except in presence of two suffi- 
cient copyholders, inhabitants of the township. 

— All persons taking sand or rubbish out of the lanes to 

pay 2s. 6d. per load. 

— Encroachment of individuals on the high-roads checked, 

and the acts of that kind then already done ordered to 
be amended, with restitution of the soil that had been 
wrongfully taken away. 

1750 The town's chest cost 26s. 

1754 Paid for repairing court-house at Derby, 49s. 6d. 

— 24th June. " It is agreed at a town's meeting, held this 

day, that whatsoever person a free or a copyholder, in the 
town of Everton, lets any cottage to any person what- 
soever not having a settlement in the township, without 
the consent of the inhabitants at a town's meeting, 
shall bear and save the township harmless, from the 
expense or damage accruing to the said township, from 
such person or persons becoming burthensome to the 
said township of Everton." — Signed by 13 persons. 
1759 Paid for paving Loggerhead-lane,* £8 13s. lOd. 

— Paid Doctor Livesley for setting Alice Knowles' leg, 42s. 

— At a town's meeting — "It is further agreed, that the 

person that serves as constable, overseer, and super- 
visor, [together with the] lord's rent, and breck-silver, 
shall be paid out of the town's ley; and that John Pyke 
be appointed the officer for the year 1759." — Signed 
by 10 persons. 

* Now Evertou-brow. 
2 E 



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418 APPENDIX. 

1761 Paid for a coffin for Witch Nancy's child, Is. 6tf. 

1763 Land near beacon first let to H. Hard war (reserving 

a foot-path to beacon), at 2s. 6d. per annum. 
1 * — Netherfield-lane land let to It. Lunt, at £3 3 s. per annum. 

1764 Leave given to Mr. Halsall to remove the pinfold. 

— Persons enclosing waste land to pay for same a valuable 

consideration. 

1765 Land near beacon sold to H. Hardwar (reserving a foot- 

path td beacon), for 84s. 
1768 Boundary stones ordered to be fixed round the mere.* 
1770 The township paid J. Seacome £20 for the land lately 

enclosed where the bridewell is — formerly styled Barn- 

on-the-hill land. 

1 774 One shilling was paid to a mayson for squaring the dial — 

(supposed of the cross.) 

1775 The Netherfield-lane land rented to Joshua Rose, for £4 

per annum — reserving the water to John Shaw.f 
1777 The Netherfield-lane land was sold by the township to 
Joshua Rose, for £140. 

1779 The road opposite Capt. Barker's house ordered to be 

widened (near Kirkdale). 

— The Brow-road, from the coffee-house westward, ordered 

to be lowered and brought to three inches to the yard. 

1780 A sum ordered by the inhabitants of the township to be 

"paid by Jos. Rose, out of Netherfield-lane purchase, to 
William Gregson, for a bill of moneys expended on 
the roads when said W. Gregson was in office. 

1785 The cross repaired, and Is. paid for same. * w 

1787 The bridewell ordered to be erected. 
-— The pump at the top of Roscommon-street purchased 
from Jos. Rose for £21, by the inhabitants at large of 
the township. 

* Only one now remaining — 1830. 
f From this it would appear to be the low land on the west of what are 
now Mr. Carson's back premises. 



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APPENDIX. 419 

1 787 Agreement with W. Harper to give and take land oppo- 
site the coffee-house, to improve the roads there. 

— 55s. 5d, paid for repairing the cross. 

1789 Mr. Rowe, Mr. Carruthers, and Mr. Harper empowered 

to dispose of some waste land near Kirkdale. 

1790 The money due to Mr. Harper for improving the roads 

ordered to be paid unto him. 

— This year John Shaw, Esq. was the holder of the greatest 

quantity of land in the township — his landed property 
in Everton being 35a. 1r. 15p. 
1797 Grass on the brow first sold, for 5s. 

— 6s. paid for going to Prescot, to get instructions about 

clocks and watches. 

— 42s. paid for taking account of clocks and watches. 

1799 Agreed that the land-tax assessors shall have a dinner 

provided for them at the coffee-house. 

1800 Notice given to Mr. Bailiff, of Kirkdale, to take down his 

encroachment on the high-road. — Mem. Mr. B. after- 
wards purchased the land from Everton. 

— The road in the village, opposite Miss Chaffers' and Mr. 

Pyke's, ordered to be widened. 

1801 The liberties or boundaries between Liverpool and Ever- 

ton examined, and marked with mere stones, by some 
of the inhabitants of Everton, together with the Rev. 
Rector Roughsedge, and John Hogg, constable of 
Everton. 

1803 A molecatcher employed by the township at £10 10s. 

per annum. 

1804 A ley of 3d. in the pound ordered, to defray a balance 

owing of £21 6s. 
1804 A posse of ancient and youthful inhabitants collected 

together by John Drinkwater, to point out, examine, 

note, and mark the boundaries of the township. 
1806 Everton called on by government to contribute a man for 

the army of reserve. 



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420 APPENDIX. 

1807 The molecatcher dismissed. 

1810 75s. 6d. paid for five volumes of Burns Justice. 

1811 Assistant-constables ordered to be employed, to keep the 

peace on Sundays and holidays. 

— Staffs ordered to be provided for said assistant-constables. 

1814 A pinfold ordered to be constructed near the mere at St. 

Domingo. 

1815 The poor and constable rate this year only 6d. in the 

pound. 

— A pump ordered to be put in the public well in the 

village. 

— The paupers ordered to be mustered at the coffee-house, 

on Whit-Monday. 

— The annual meetings ordered to take place at 4 o'clock 

in the afternoon. 

— Extra constables' pay to be 3s. a day. 

1816 A stove and pipe was procured for the bridewell — cost 

£3 10s. 6d. 

— Charles Okill, Esq. caused the boundaries to be peram- 

bulated y the parties present were C. Okill, James 
Green, Thomas Aspinall, Richard Powell, John Pyke, 
Edmund Mawdsley, Alexander Thompson, and his 
sons, William Halliday, Thomas Pyke, and John Lyon. 

1817 Thanks voted to C. Okill, Esq., for his useful exertions in 

the affairs of the township. 

— £17 14s. 9d. voted to pay expenses incurred in prosecuting 

four footpads ; and liberty given to the chief constable 
to discharge other similar charges should they be in- 
curred, but limited the amount not to exceed £20. 

— The following were the townships holding copartnery in 

a workhouse at Ormskirk: Everton, Bootle, Little 
Crosbie, Lidiate, Halsall, Maghull, Melling, Down- 
holland, Bickersteth, Latham, Burscough, Scarsbrick, 
Bretherton, Tail ton, Simmons wood, Croston. This 
year Everton gave up all claim to this workhouse, and 



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APPENDIX. 421 

separated itself from the copartnery formally, and 
according to law. 

1818 Thanks to Richard Powell, Esq., for his useful exertions 

in the affairs of the township. 

— Thomas Molyneux, Esq. and Rev. J. Brookes, as magis- 

trates, apportioned the parts of Boundary-lane to be 
kept in repair by Everton and West Derby respectively. 

1819 This year a law bill was paid by the township of Everton 

amounting to £107 12s. 2d. 

— The township of Everton paid 3s. for posting up bills to 

prevent the holding of Folly-fair. 

1820 An extra ley of 2s. Id. in the pound, on the whole 

amount of assessed taxes for the present year, was laid, 
to make up the constable's deficiency of £389. 

1821 Thirty guineas was presented to Mr. Sherwood for sur- 

veying the township. 
1824 A sum of £3 was voted to be thenceforth paid annually 
to the assessors of the township to defray their neces- 
sary expenses. 

1826 The road near the house of Thomas Shaw, Esq. widened 

considerably. 

— The inhabitants of Everton (assembled at the coffee-house) 

declined to consent to any alteration being made in the 
mode at present used of raising the parish church rate. 
See the town s book, where copious minutes on this 
subject are entered. 

1827 £79 17s. 2d., arrears of lord's rent, &c. was paid to the 

Marquis of Salisbury by the constable (and treasurer) 
of the township ; and in the same year £6 8s. 4d. was 
also paid to the Marquis on the same account: this latter 
sum was ordered to be paid out of the rent of the pin- 
fold cottage, and to be thenceforth paid out of rents of 
same. 

1828 £5 was paid for a plan and specification for building a 

new bridewell. 



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422 APPENDIX. 

1830 March 26. At a meeting of the inhabitants, held this day, 
at Halliday's, the Everton coffee-house, the town's 
accounts were audited and passed. : It appears that at 
this time there are fifty-one paupers receiving relief 
from the township, viz. — 3 aged males, 20 aged females, 
12 boys, and 16 girls. 

— Mr. John Mc George and Mr. Edmund Mawdsley were 

re-elected overseers for the ensuing year. 

— Mr. Thomas Moore and Mr James Heaton were elected 

assessors for 1830 — 1. • .... 

— The cost of embellishing the bridewell was £35. An 

effort was made to have an* order passed to discontinue 
the allowance paid by the township to certain Everton 
jurors for attending the West Derby court, at Whit- 
suntide; but the precedent, usage, and custom of forty- 
four years were urged against, and made the means of 
overruling the effort: the lowest sum paid by the town- 
ship to such Everton jurors was 4s., in the year 1778 — 
the highest sum so paid was £6 10s., in the year 1827; 
last year the Everton jurors were paid £3 by the town- 
. ship for their attendance at the Derby court. 



CHURCH OF ST. GEORGE, EVERTON. 

Abstract of an Act of Parliament passed in the year 1813. 

An act to aid and authorise certain individuals to erect a 
church at Everton. 

The parish church of Walton being distant, and. no church 
whatever in the township of Everton, it became necessary 
to afford better accommodation to the growing population of 
Everton to perform their pious devotions; and the sum of 
£11,500 having been raised in subscription shares of £100 
each, for the purpose of erecting a church ; and James Ather- 
ton, Esq. being desirous to gratuitously convey and relinquish 



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APPENDIX. 423 

his right and interest in certain land conveniently situated for 
said church, &c.; 

An act was passed as aforesaid, in the year 1813. 

1. Land vested in trustees for the purpose of building a 
church — trustees named, * John Drinkwater the younger, Colin 
Campbell, Thomas Tattersall the younger, * Joseph Toundrow, 
and William Wiat. 

2. Election of new trustees. 

3. Materials and size of the church. 

4. Appropriation of a pew for the minister, and one for his 
servants; and also a pew for Mr. Atherton, and one for his 
servants ; and one hundred sittings for the poor. 

5. The committee may sell all the other pews to the pro- 
prietors and the public. 

6. Rents of pews to be fixed; not to amount to more in 
the whole than £400, nor less than £360 per annum. 

7. Beneficial interest in the seats to be deemed personal 
property, and assignable and deviseable as such. 

8. For the recovery of pew rents. 

9. Nomination of minister or chaplain vested in a majority 
of the proprietors for thirty years from the time of passing the 
act ; but if the minister should die subsequent to the said term 
of thirty years, and previous to the expiration of forty years, 
then the further right of nomination of a minister shall be 
vested in the proprietors until the expiration of the said forty 
years. After the right of nomination of the proprietors shall 
have ceased, then the presentation or nomination of a minister 
is vested for ever in the patron, having the advowson of the 
parish church of Walton, &c. 

10. In case of a lapse of more than six months without any 
nomination, then the usages of the laws of the realm are to be 
followed . 

12. Meetings appointing churchwardens, to be on Thursdays 

Those marked thus * are or were residents of Liverpool : the latter is 
deceased. 



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424 APPENDIX. 

annually in Easter week: two persons, who are proprietors 
of seats or pews shall be chosen churchwardens ; and so long as 
the right of nomination of a minister shall remain vested in the 
proprietors, the said proprietors shall elect both churchwardens. 

13. Duty of churchwardens, and application of pew rents. 

14. When the patron presents ministers, then the proprietors 
shall choose one churchwarden, and the minister the other; 
and in case of the death of a churchwarden, the proprietors 
or minister shall elect another, as the case may be. 

15. Minister's salary fixed at £300 per annum, to be paid 
each first day of February, and each first day of August. 

16. Recovery of minister's salary if not duly paid. 

17. The minister to appoint and dismiss clerk, sexton, and 
organist : the wages not to be less to the clerk than £20 ; to 
the sexton, £10; and to the organist, £25 per annum. 

18. A vault to be reserved for Mr. Atherton — the residue of 
the burial places to be sold by the committee. Persons 
purchasing burial places to provide grave-stones within six 
months, under a penalty of £5. 

19. Coffins not to be placed in the churchyard within two 
feet of the surface. 

20. All funerals to enter at the eastern gate only ; unless with 
permission of James Atherton, Esq., his heirs, or assigns. 

21. Banns may be published, and marriages celebrated, in 
the church. 

22. Register to be kept. 

23. Double fees to be paid, of which, one half to go to the 
vicar of the parish church of Walton, and the other part to the 
minister, &c. of the church of St. George. 

25. Present committee to continue twelve months after cele- 
bration of Divine worship. Names of committee, viz., James 
Atherton, John Cragg, Thomas Tattersall the elder, William 
Harding, T. F. Dyson, Charles Horsfall, George Brown, Thomas 
Huson, and Colin Campbell; their expenses not to exceed 
£11,500. 

28. Interest in the church to be forfeited in case 6f non- 



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APPENDIX. 425 

payment of subscription. Forfeited shares may be sold by 
publication, or the committee may bring actions in lieu of 
declaring shares forfeited. 

30. £400 to be retained by the committee as a fund for 
repairs of the church. 

31. Owners of seats for the time being to keep the church in 
repair. 

32. Residue money to be equally divided among the pro- 
prietors. 

33. No person to hold more than ten shares. 

34. Proprietors to have one vote for each and every share 
they may hold, to the extent of ten votes or shares only. 

35. On the first Monday of every year, committee to call a 
general meeting; and at any time ten proprietors may demand 
a general meeting to be held, and from time to time, on giving 
ten days' notice to the chairman of the committee, and in two 
of the Liverpool newspapers. 

36. The notices to be given by publishing in two of the 
Liverpool newspapers ; and in such notices the objects of the 
meetings shall be expressed. 

37. Proprietors may appoint committees, and not exceeding 
three auditors. Accounts to be audited and exhibited annually. 

38. The rights of the patron, rector and vicar of Walton, to 
be saved. 

ORIGINAL SUBSCRIBERS TO ERECT A CHURCH AT EVERTON. 

1813. 

1 William Harding £200 12 Jos. Toundrow 300 

2 James Atherton 1000 13 John Hinde 100 

3 George Clements, Jiin. . . 100 14 George Brown 200 

4 George Farrar, Jun 100 15 Charles Horsfall 200 

5 John Boardman 100 16 William Corner 100 

6 James Willasey 200 17 Rt. Thompson 100 

7 John Marsh 200 18 T. Tattersall, Sen 500 

8 William Byrom 300 19 William Brade 100 

9 John Cregg 600 20 Robt. J. Buddicom 1000 

10 Thomas Hughes 100 21 Richard Dobson 200 

11 William Lyne 100 22 Thomas Murrow 100 



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42G 



APPENDIX. 



23 J. Mc George 100 49 

24 John Watmough 100 50 

25 Thomas F. Dyson 200 51 

26 Jos. Ellinthorp 100 52 

27 Robert Gill 100 53 

28 William Ramsbottom ... 100 54 

29 William Statham 100 55 

30 George Goring ....*.... 100 56 

31 Thomas Huson 100 51 

32 Thomas C. Porter 100 58 

33 William Wiatt 200 59 

34 William Duff 100 60 

35 Colin Campbell 100 61 

36 E. Griffiths 100 62 

37 William Ewart . . 100 63 

38 Hugh Duckworth, Jun... 100 64 

39 Samuel Dutton 100 65 

40 Cuthbert Fair 100 66 

41 Thomas Tattersall, Jun. ♦ 200 67 

42 Robert Musgrove 100 68 

43 Abraham Garnett ...... 100 69 

44 Robert Copeland 100 70 

45 Richard Jackson . . i 1 00 71 

46 Robert Peel 100 72 

47 John Drinkwater, Jun. . . 100 73 

48 John G. Geller 100 



William Gibson 200 

Gilbert Henderson 100 

William Brown 100 

George Roach 1 00 

James Hornby 100 

Henry Barton, Sen 100 

Henry Orme 100 

John Pyke 100 

William Dickson ...... 1 00 

John Adams 100 

James Massey 100 

William Bird, Jun 100 

James Holme 100 

George Broadbent 100 

Henry Holt 100 

Robert Wilson. 100 

William Barton 100 

Charles Okill 100 

William Appleton 200 

Samuel Sandbach 100 

Alexander Mc Gregor . . 100 

William Turner 100 

Jos. Humphries 100 

William Earle 100 

John Ross 100 

Total number of shares 115. 



When pews are purchased in this church, the purchaser should clearly 
understand whether he buys the pews only, or with the pews ; the original 
proprietors' right to vote, and a claim to a proportion of proceeds to arise 
from the sale of burial places, &c. &c. 

After the completion of the church, the whole of the pews 
(except some few in the organ- gallery) were sold to the 
subscribers on the 28th and 3Jst October, 1814, at various 
prices ; the lowest price then given was £27 for a single pew, 
the highest price £180 for a family pew with servant's pew 
attached. £1 10s. is the lowest, and £5 the highest amount 
at which the pews in this church are assessed, for reserved 
or fixed rents : the pews that are under the north and south 
galleries are assessed at £2 10s. per annum ; those in the body 
of the church at £3 10s. per annum; those in the north and 



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APPENDIX. 



427 



south galleries at £5 per annum, and those in the organ gallery 
at £l 10s. and £2 per annum. 

The first stone of this church was laid on the 19th April, 
1813; and on the 30th October, 1814, it was opened, and 
divine worship was then first publicly performed. 

'An account of the marriages, baptisms, and burials at the 
church of St. George, in Everton, from 4he opening thereof, to 
12th April, 1830. 



































12th m " 




1814 


1815 


1816 


1817 


1818 


1819 


1820 


1821 


1822 


1823 


1824 


1825 


1826 


1827 


1828 


1829 


Apl. 

1830 


10- 

tal. 


Marriages 


5 


9 


9 


13 


11 


10 


9 


17 


11 


27 


J9 


25 


25 


27 


29 


30 


8 


284 


Baptisms 


2 


21 


24 


20 


21 


31 


36 


30 


36 


45 


38 


54 


38 


53 


59 


53 


8 


569 


Burials .. 





5 


7 


8 


7 


11 


9 


11 


10 


18 


19 


15 


22 


19 


29 


29 


6 


225 



THE MANNER IN WHICH THE FOLLOWING TOWNSHIPS SERVE 
AS (OR PROVIDE) CHURCHWARDENS IN WALTON PARISH. 

West Derby, exempt for two years; serves the third. 
Walton, exempt for five years, serves the sixth. 
Fazakerly, exempt for five years, serves the sixth. 
Bootle, exempt for eight years, serves the ninth. 
Kirkdale, exempt for eight years, serves the ninth. 
Everton, exempt for eight years, serves the ninth. 

A single church ley (1817) in the parish of Walton makes 

£24. The following are the names of the townships that pay 

towards making it up. 

West Derby £10 5 8 Bootle-cum-Linacre . . 16 9 

Formby 3 8 7 Kirkdale 1 6 9 

Kirkby 3 8 7 Everton 15 1 

™Ti MS 3 *^~° 

Fazakerly 1 14 3§ 

Simmonswood, Croxteth, and Toxteth Park object to pay, on the 
score of original poverty. 

These rates or proportions of each of the above townships 



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328 APPENDIX. 

were fixed after Liverpool separated itself from Walton in 
1698: previous to that separation, Everton paid 13s. 4d. at 
every £24 rate, Liverpool having paid £5 6s. 8d. 

The inhabitants of Everton are subject to annual calls for 
dues belonging to the vicar of Walton. The following is a copy 
of a printed note actually given on payment of those dues 
at Easter. The charge is affixed to each of the items in the 
copy here presented ; but there are few persons in the township 
of Everton that pay more, or other, than the first three of the 
enumerated items in the list. 

COPY. 

Easter offerings belonging to the vicar of Walton, as follows: 

s. d. 
Man and wife » 3 

Housekeeper, widow, or widower 2 

Communicants, or persons above the age of 

sixteen 0|each 

Cow and calf 1 j 

2 ditto 3 

3 ditto 4| 

4 ditto 6 

5 ditto 1 

6 ditto and 7 ditto 4 

8 ditto and 9 ditto 6 

10 ditto 8 

A farrow cow 1 

Colt 1 

Bees per swarm 4 

Smoke and garden uncertain. 

Wind-mill 2 

Water-mill 4 

Hemp and flax (per bushell) sown 1 

Eggs 0| 

Mautry money uncertain. 



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APPENDIX. 329 

These dues are collected annually at Easter, by the constables, 
of the respective townships. 

In the year 1829, £10 12s. 6d. was collected at Everton for 
these dues, viz. — 

Inhabited houses, not keeping cows £5 17 6 

Cowkeepers, and persons renting land, 

keeping cows, charged for cows 4 15 



£10 12 6 



THE CEMETERY, NOW CALLED THE NECROPOLIS, AT 
EVERTON. 

" On Tuesday, the 1st of February, 1825, the new cemetery, 
at the top of Brunswick-road, was opened to the public, and the 
body of the late Mrs. Martha Hope, sister to Mr. William Hope, 
of Hope-street, Liverpool, in compliance with the earnest wish 
she had repeatedly expressed before her decease, was interred 
there. This being the first interment in the cemetery, the Rev. 
Dr. Raffles, in compliance with the invitation of the committee, 
gave an address, explanatory of the intentions of the proprietors 
in providing this very important addition to the existing depo- 
sitories for the dead ; and the Rev. Moses Fisher afterward a 
conducted the funeral service. 

" Notwithstanding the very unfavourable state of the weather, 
and the privacy with which it was the wish of the family of the 
deceased that the funeral offices should be performed, a large 
concourse of persons was assembled, including the committee, 
and a great proportion of the proprietors, who attended in. 
mourning. 

" The Rev. Doctor's address was extremely appropriate and 
judicious. After pointing out the evils attendant on the crowded 
state of our church-yards, and other places of sepulture in the town, 
and remarking on the manifest impropriety of interring bodies 
in the interior of places of worship, the doctor adverted, amongst 



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430 APPENDIX. 

other advantages proffered in the new cemetery, to the circum- 
stances of every denomination of Christians being at liberty 
either to inter in it with the use of their own ritual, or to dis- 
pense with forms altogether ; and to the equal liberty given to 
all, either to make use of the services of the resident chaplain 
or registrar, or to employ their own minister: he especially 
pointed out the precautions taken by the committee of manage- 
ment effectually to preserve the sanctuary of the dead from 
violation, and their determination to render the undertaking, in 
all its arrangements, as to the laying out of the ground, the 
exact register of every interment in it, and the minor but impor- 
tant regulations of the establishment, worthy of the attention of 
the passing stranger, and of general adoption in similar insti- 
tutions. He concluded by endeavouring to raise the views of 
his audience from these secular considerations to others of a 
more exalted character, directing their contemplations to that 
solemn scene when every one who should be interred there 
should, with an assembled world, stand before the Judge of all, 
there to hear his final doom, according to the deeds done in the 
body, whether good or evil. 

« The area of the ground allotted to burials includes about 
five statute acres, about one-half of which will be appropriated 
to graves, and the other to vaults. Besides these, the entire 
area (within the walls) will be surrounded by family sepulchres; 
enclosed in a covered aisle, with a front of masonry correspond- 
ing with the style of the chapel and the residence of the chap- 
lain, and relieved by iron railings at the openings. This covered 
aisle not only renders security doubly sure, but it will afford 
ample scope for the exercise of ingenuity and good taste in the 
erection of sepulchral monuments, and other memorials of the 
virtues and excellencies of departed friends. The whole esta- 
blishment is vested in twenty-one trustees." — Liverpool Mercury, 
1st February, 1825. 

The cemetery contains about 24,000 superficial square yards> 
and the undertaking cost nearly £8000. 



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APPENDIX. 431 

[The following is taken from Mr. Kaye's 'Stranger in Liverpool.'] 

"The front of the building and the adjoining wall are of 
stone. A border of ten feet wide, immediately adjoining the 
interior side of the wall and surrounding the whole ground/ is 
set apart for an arcade or colonnade, which will be roofed 
with slate, and railed in by ornamental iron -work, set upon a 
stone plinth; this border will be used for tombs; and any 
monumental inscription, tablet, or work of sculpture that may 
be erected, will be placed against the wall, at the head of the 
respective tombs. 

"The centre of the ground is appropriated to vaults and 
graves, laid out in the regular order, and numbered according 
to a plan which may be seen at the registrars office. Each 
corpse interred is regularly registered in the books of the insti- 
tution. 

" The chapel is at the service of any person who may wish to 
use it, and any religious funeral ceremony may be performed 
in it by the* minister, or other person chosen by the parties who 
may require its use, provided such ceremony is not an outrage 
upon the decencies of life, or offensive to civilized society ; but 
if the friends of the person to be interred prefer the ceremony 
being performed by the registrar of the cemetery, it is his duty 
to perform it according to a prescribed form, which may be 
seen on application to him, and without any charge or fee for 
such performance; or, if preferred, the interment may be made 
without any form or religious rite. 

" For the purpose of greater security, a watchman is at all 
times of the night upon the ground. A committee have a 
superintending control, and will take care that nothing offensive, 
ludicrous, or in evident bad taste, shall appear among the 
monumental inscriptions, or in any other way. 

"A system of the utmost liberality pervades the entire 
management of this cemetery ; and it is to be hoped that no 



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432 APPENDIX. 

religious distinctions or prejudices will arise to prevent its being 
the earthly resting place of those who, for security, or from 
other motives of preference, may be disposed to adopt it." 

Charges made at Low-hill Necropolis, or General Cemetery. 

£. s. d. 

A single interment, without inscription 10 

Do. do. do. if in the forenoon ... . 12 6 

Do. do. with name, age, and time of decease 

engraved on stone 1 2 

Do. do do. if in the forenoon .... 1 4 6 

Do. do. still-born child (afternoon) 3 - 

A grave 6 ft. 6 in. long by 3 ft. wide, and 10 ft. deep .... 3 

A stone for do. 4 in. thick.. ..^ 2 

Sinking graves, and all other expenses of first interment . . 17 6 

Expenses of each future interment in do 14 6 

A vault 7 'ft. long by 3 ft. 6 in. wide, stone 6 ft. 9 in. long 
by 3 ft. 3 in. wide and 4§ in. thick, sinking 10§ ft, 

drains, brickwork, and labour 12 

Expenses of first interment, including inner covering of 

stone 1 2 

Expenses of each future interment, including do 1 9 6 

A family vault or sepulchre, in covered aisle, with space 
for tablet and other monumental designs, land 10 ft. 
6 in. by 3 ft. 5§ in., sinking, brickwork, drains, labour, 

stone, and flags 30 

Engravings of stones, viz. — Bordering and edging, for graves 8s., 
vaults 10s., vaults in covered aisle 10s. 6d. ; heading with large 
letters 3s., capitals 2s., and small letters Is. each per dozen. 
All graves, &c. to be paid for on order. 
No additional charge is made for fees, or expenses of any kind whatever. 
Every interment will be carefully registered, under the superin- 
tendence of the committee. The parties interring are at liberty to avail 
themselves of the services of the chaplain, and to use or not to use the 
form of service sanctioned by the committee, at their option ; and they 
are equally at liberty to avail themselves of the services of their own 
minister, and to use their own form of worship. 

No applications will be received on Sundays; but interments may 
take place on that day, between the hours of public worship. 



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APPENDIX. 



433 



THE EVERTON BEACON SOCIETY. 

This society originated with John Pyke, Esq. within the last 
twenty years; it was, however, suffered to dissolve, through 
lack of unanimity; but, after having been discontinued, or 
broken up, for some time, the society was resuscitated by Mr. 
John Mc George, about five years ago. The practice is, to 
meet on each birth-day of the respective members of this society: 
harmony and conviviality are the orders of the Everton Beacon 
Society's festive hours. 

Each member, on his natal day, pays Rye shillings; the 
others, that assemble on such occasions, order and consume 
wassail ad libitum, and, after the said five shillings are ex- 
pended, individually liquidate according to the orders they 
issue. The number of members is, at present ( 1829), about fifty. 



A STATEMENT 

Of the occupiers, owners, tenures, and classes of the houses and 
villas of Everton, arranged nearly in the order in which 
they now respectively stand in the several streets, roads, and 
places of the township, made up to the 3d April, 1830. 

Those persons who have the initials of their christian names 
attached to their surnames are occupiers. 

Those persons whose surnames only are given are owners. 

The letters, H. G. V. C. S., signify house, garden,, villa, cottage, 
and shop. 

The figures, 1 to 12, signify the classes, as to rental, from the 
first to the twelfth, according as the respective cases may 
require. 

The capitals, F. C. L., denote freehold, copyhold, and leasehold. 





Everton Crescent. 


(1) 


Rawdon, J. 


Padley 


H. & G. 6 F. 


Empty 


Webster 


H. & G. 6 F. 


Haines, K. 


Ditto . 

2 F 


H. & G. 6 F. 



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Yelverton, W. 


Peele 


H. &G. 


6 F. 


Brown, G. 


Self 


H. &G. 


6 F. 


Unsworth, J. 


Atherton 


H. &G. 


7 F. 


Empty 


Bibby 


H. &G. 


9 F. 


Neale, J. 


Ditto 


H.&G. 


9 F. 


Brebner, J. 


Ditto 


H.&G. 


9 F. 


Jones, J. 


Ditto 


H. &G. 


9 F. 


Tomlinson, J. 


Self 


H. &G. 


6 F. 


Yates, Mrs. U. 


Hornby 


H. &G. 


6 F. 


Rowe, Miss S. 


Scholefield 


H.&G. 


6 F. 


Blundell, Mrs. M. 


Self 


H.&G. 


7 F. 


Porter, T. 


Waterhouse 


H.&G. 


7 F. 


Wright, J. 


Self 


H.&G. 


6 F. 




Everton Brow. 


(2) 




Stennett, Mrs. A. 


Gilleland 


H.&G. 


9 F. 


Latham, Miss A. 


Self 


H.&G. 


9 F. 


Prescott, W. 


Latham 


H.&G. 


8 F. 


Powles, W. A. 


Holmes 


H.&G. 


F. 


Jones, C. H. 


Ditto 


H.&G. 


6 F. 


Duarte, T. J. 


Ditto 


H.&G. 


6 F. 


Holmes, H* 


Self 


H.&G. 


4 F. 


Holmes, J. 


Self 


H.&G. 


4 F. 


Hanmer, L. 


Self 


H.&G. 


4 F. 


Cooper, J. 


Simpson 


H.&G. 


11 F. 


Bebbington, J. 


Ditto 


H.&G. 


12 F. 


Houghton, J. 


Ditto 


H.&G. 


11 F. 


Netherfield-road South. (3) 




Barton, Mrs. S. 


Dixon 


V. 


4 C. 


Dixon, W. 


Self 


V. 


6 C. 


Simpson, J. 


Self 


V. 


7 C. 


Livingstone, Mrs. 


Self 


V. 


6 C. 


Haworth, Mrs. 


Livingstone 


V. 


8 C. 


Marsh, Mrs. 


Self 


V, 


5 C. 



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APPENDIX. 






RadclifTe, W. 


Kevan 


H. &G. 


10 C. 


Anderton, T. 


Ditto 


H. &G. 


10 C. 


Lapage, F. 


Huson 


V. 


7 C. 


Staniforth, S. 


Brooks 


V. 


3 C. 


Alston, J. F. 


Greenway 


V. 


3 C. 


Brown, W. 


Self 


V. 


1 C. 


Ellison, Miss 


Brown 


H. &G. 


11 C. 


Knowles, T. 


Lorimer 


School 


8 L, 


Robinson, W. 


Self 


V. 


7 C. 


Wainwright, T. W. 


Robinson 


V. 


7 C. 


Netherfield-road North. (4) 




Hall, C. 


Carson 


H. 


11 L. 


Carson, J. 


Ditto 


V. 


2 L. 


Dobson, R. 


Self 


V. 


4 F. 


Earle, W. 


Self 


V. 


1 F. 


Tarlton, Miss 


Self 


V. 


7 F. 


Chew, Mrs. 


Exrs. Beetenson H. & G. 


11 L. 


Eyes, Miss 


Ditto 


H. &G. 


11 L. 


Syers, R. 


Ditto 


H. &G. 


11 L. 


Mather, J. P. 


Self 


V. 


1 F. 


Boardman, J. B. 


Self 


V. 


9 L. 


Empty 


Ball 


V. 


8 L. 


Ball, T. 


Ditto 


V. 


7 L. 


Cropper, J. 


Self 


V. 


1 F. 


Empty 


Worrall 


H. &G. 


8 L. 


Lester, E. 


Self 


V. 


7 L. 


Jones, E. 


Self 


H. &G. 


11 L. 


Franklin, T. 


Beakbane 


H. &G. 


10 L. 


Boothby, J. B. 


Ackers 


V. 


6 L. 


Campbell, C. 


Self 


V. 


7 L. 


Empty 


ExrsB rocklebank V. 


9 L. 


Campbell, J. 


Ditto 


V. 


9 L. 


Howe, J. 


Harrison 


V. 


9 L. 


Davidson, J. 


Powell 


V. 


9 Ia 



435 



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Boardman, J. 


Self 


V. 


9 L. 


Horsfall, C. 


Self 


V. 


3 F. 


Laffer, H. 


Self 


V. 


9 L. 


Salkeld, G. 


Oilman 


V. 


9 L. 


Ledson, R. 


Self 


V. 


9 L. 


Potter, Mrs. J. 


Self 


V. 


4 F. 


Scurr, J. 


Potter 


V. 


4 F. 


Jackson, W. 


Holmes 


V. 


8 L. 


Baldwin, W. H, 


Ditto 


V. 


8 L. 


Holmes, J. 


Self 


H. 


10 L. 


Stiles, S. C. 


Holmes 


V. 


11 L. 


Hatton, B. 


Ditto 


H. 


11 L. 


Tadock, W. 


Self 


V. 


9 L. 


Attwood, Mrs. 


Grundy 


H. 


11 L. 


Hankin, W. 


Leigh 


Quarry 


11 L. 




Devonshire Place 


(5) 




Mottershead, T. 


Smith 


H. &G. 


11 L. 


Johnson, Mrs. 


Walthew 


H. &G. 


9 L. 


Cannel, Miss 


Holmes 


H. &G. 


10 L. 


Harrop, J. 


Woods 


H. &G. 


10 L. 


Delonde, C. 


Williams 


H. & G. 


9 L. 


Empty 


Barrowclough 


H. &G. 


9 L. 


Clare, George 


Ditto 


H. &G. 


11 L, 


Empty 


Ditto 


H. &G. 


11 L. 


Bickersteth, W. 


Roberts 


H. &G. 


11 L. 


Ashcroft, E. 


Self 


H. &G. 


11 L. 


Empty 


Cross 


H. &G. 


11 L. 


Empty 


Matthews 


H. &G. 


9 L. 


Lady Reid 


Ditto 


H. & G. 


9 L. 


Wilson, Mrs. 


Smith 


H. &G. 


11 L. 


Smith, J. 


Self 


H. &G. 


11 L. 


Carter, W. 


Smith 


H. &G. 


11 L. 


Gandy, W. J. 


Brown 


H. &G. 


11 L. 


Buchanan, J. 


Roberts 


H. &G. 


10 L. 



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APPENDIX. 






Atwood, J. 


Jackson 


H. &G. 


10 L. 


Fair, Miss A. 


Brown 


H. &G. 


10 L. 


Forshaw, Mrs. S. 


Edwards 


H. &G. 


10 L. 


Bootle Water-works 


Selves 


Tank 


8 L 


Pearson, J. 


Self 


H. 


11 L. 


Saint Domingo Lani 


B. (6) 




Duly, R. 


Self 


H.&S. 


11 L. 


Anderson, J. 


Atherton 


H. 


11 L. 


Empty- 


Exrs Edwards 


H. 


10 L. 


Swift, Mrs. J. 


Whitley 


H. 


11 L. 


Williams, E. 


Stretch 


H. 


11 L. 


Rogerson, J. 


Ditto 


H. 


12 L. 


Morgan, J. 


Ditto 


H. 


12 L. 


Maxwell, J. 


M'George 


H. 


12 L. 


M'George, J. 


Self 


H.&S. 


11 L. 


Everton Valley. 


(7) 




Brocklekank, Mrs. 


Stretch 


H. 


11 L. 


Harper, D. 


Self 


H. 


12 L. 


Lang, J. 


Self 


H. 


8 L. 


Richardson, Captain 


Lang 


H. 


9 L. 


Empty 


Ditto 


H. 


9 L. 


Wrigley, James H. 


Ditto 


H. 


9 L. 


Hindle, J. 


Self 


H. 


12 L. 


Coleburn, Mrs. 


Hindle 


H. 


12 L. 


Bronte Villa. (81) 




Woodhouse, S. 

XXT a *■ 


Self 


V. 


2 L. 



437 



(8) 
Pritchard, Mrs. Self V. 

Beacon Lane. (9) 
Rothwell, William Pritchard H. 

Ramsbotham, G. Rhodes H. 



9 L. 



11 L. 
11 L. 



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433 


APPENDIX 


• 




Corrie, Miss 


M'Gregor 


School 


1 L. 


Whalley, J. 


Ditto 


Nursery 


10 L. 


Sandiford, J. 


Atherton 


H. 


11 L. 


Empty 


Knowles 


H.G. 


11 L. 




Sparling Street 


• (10) 




Myers, R. 


Atherton 


H. 


11 L. 




Church Street. 


(ID 




Harris, T. 


Atherton 


H.School 4 L. 


Parry, R. 


Ditto 


H. 


10 L. 


Belcher, M. 


Robinson 


H.G. 


10 L. 


Exrs Willasey 


Harrison 


H.G. 


10 L. 


Potter, Miss 


Atherton 


H. 


11 L. 


Thompson, A. 


Okill & others H.G. 


11 L. 


Foden, W. 


Cropper 


H. 


11 L. 


Williams, W. 


Dickson 


H. 


11 C. 


Wyberg, G. 


Ditto 


H. 


11 C. 


Perry, W. 


Self 


V. 


6 C. 


Lorimer, C. 


Dickson 


V. 


8 C. 


Coleman, R. 


Ditto 


School 


9 C, 


Exrs Drinkwater 


Selves 


V. 


9 C. 


Dyson, T. 


Self 


V. 


1 C. 


Empty 


Bowman 


H. 


9 C. 


M'George, Miss 


M'George 


H. 


11 L. 




Mere Lane. 


(12) 




Myers, W. 


Self 


V. 


1 L. 




Lodge Lane. 


(13) 




Warner, C. 


Rowland 


V. 


6 L. 


Moon, J. 


Ditto 


V. 


6 L. 


Middleton, C. S. 


Atherton 


V. 


5 L. 


Humphries, David Lightfoot 


V. 


5 L. 


Atherton, J. 


Self 


V. 


2 L. 



Hornby, J. 



Self 



V. 



2 L. 



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APPENDIX. 




439 


Barker, J. R. 


Dyson 


V. 


9 L. 


Empty 


Ditto 


V. 


10 L. 


Led ward, E. 


Self 


V. 


5 L. 


Buddicom, Rev 


, R. P. Self 


V. 


8 L. 


Ironside, C. 


Heyworth 


V. 


5 L. 


Wilson, E. 


Ditto 


V. 


6 L. 


Brown, W. A. 


Forrest 


V. 


8 L. 


Heyworth, 0. 


Self 


V. 


2 L. 




Saint George's Hill 


(14) 




Dickson, G. 


Self 


V. 


2 C. 


Heyworth, J. 


Self 


V. 


2 C. 


Wilson, W. 


M'Gregor 


V. 


9 L. 


Henry, W. 


Ditto 
Terrace. (15] 


V. 


2 L. 


Barton, Miss 


Batley 


V. 


9 C. 


Batley, George 


Ditto 


V. 


7 C. 


Barton, M. 


Self 


V. 


7 C. 


Empty 


Barton 


V. 


9 C. 


Taylor, J. 


Self 


V. 


2 C. 


Sharp, Miss 


Stubbs 


School 


2 C. 


Tattersall, T. 


Self 


V. 


5 C. 


Muller, J. F. 


Lorimer 


V. 


10 L. 


Lorimer, Mrs. 


Ditto 


V. 


10 L. 


English, T. 


Ditto 


V. 


10 L. 


Flemming, T. 


Ditto 


V. 


10 L. 


Moore, S. 


Ditto 


V. 


10 L. 


Fennel, C. 


Ditto 


V. 


10 L. 


Best, Miss 


Blundell 


H. 


11 L. 


Branch, T. 


Ditto 


V. 


9 C. 


Higginson, J. 


Self 


V. 


1 C. 


Hope, S. 


Self 


V. 


3 C. 


Brawn, L. 


Hope 


V. 


6 L. & C 


Watkins, R. 


Ditto 


V. 


8 L. & C, 



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440 



APPENDIX. 



Empty 


Hope 


V. 


3 L. 


Guest, J. 


Exrs Ellinthorp H. 


11 L. 


Jones, J. 


Ditto 


H. 


12 L. 


Pennington, J. 


Ditto 


H. 


11 L. 


Kitchen, J. E. 


Ditto 


H. 


12 L. 


Thomas, E. 


Ditto 


H. 


11 L. 


Cook, W. 


Ditto 


H. 


11 L. 


Hughes, Miss 


Self 


H. 


11 L. 




Rupert Lane 


(16) 




Halliday, W. 


Golightly 


Inn 


10 C. 


Johnson, J. • 


Atherton 


V. 


9 C. 


Cowgill, Mrs. 


Self 


V. 


9 C. 


Aspinall, T. 


M' George 


V. 


9 C. 


Shand, C. 


Self 


V. 


1 C. 


Kendall, Mrs. E. 


Lowrie 


V. 


10 C. 


Lowrie, T. 


Self 


V. 


8 C. 


Taylor, J. 


Pyke 


V. 


10 C. 


Benn, R. 


Brandreth 


V. 


9 C. 


Bull, Mrs. 


Ditto 


H. 


12 C. 




Village. 


(17) 




Harrison, W. 


Fanner 


H. 


11 C. 


Chaffers, Miss 


Self 


V. 


5 C. 


Wrenshall, W. 


Pyke 


V. 


7 C. 


Pyke, J. 


Self 


V. 


7 C. 


Stevenson, C. 


Pyke 


H. 


12 C. 


Empty 


Plumpton 


V. 


9 C. 


Syers, W. 


Tatlock 


H. 


10 C. 


Shaw, W. 


Farmer 


H. 


11 C. 


Rainford, T. 


Hodgson 


C. 


12 C. 


Jones, W. 


Ditto 


C. 


11 C. 


Slingsby, J. 


Slingsby 


C. 


10 c. 


Tatlock, Mrs. 


Self 


V. 


8 C 


Empty 


Anderton 


C. 


12 C 



& c. 



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Hitchmough, J. 
Slingsby, T. 
Atherton, R. 
Creer, R. 
Sandiford, R. 
Topping, Mrs. 
Smith, John 
Lyon, John 
Syers, G. 
Robson, T. 
Withers, G. 
Holmes, J. 
Shaw, T. 



Rutter, Mrs. 
Coleman, Miss 
Buchanan, D. 
Sands, T. 
Wain, Mrs. 
Latham, A. 
Fosberry, W. 
Logan, J. 
Russell, William 
Brooks, Rev. J. 
Roach, Mrs. 

Empty 
Lodge, A. 



Ross, H. W. 



Bruce, Rev. J. 
Jones, Mrs. S. 



APPENDIX. 

Anderton 
Ditto 
Naylor 
M'George 
Self 
Self 
Shaw- 
Farmer 
Green 
Ditto 
Brown 
Fisher 
Self 

Everton Lane. 

Shaw 

ClirTe 

Plumpton 

Ditto 

Ditto 

Ditto 

Self 

Gleave 

Self 

Plumpton 

Ditto 

Gregson 



441 



C. 
H. 

Dairy 
H. & S. 
H. & S, 
H. 
C. 

V. 
V. 
V. 
V. 
V. 

(18) 
H. 

School 
V. 
V. 
V. 
V. 
V. 
V. 
V. 
V. 

H. &G. 
H. &G. 
V. 



12 C. 

10 C. 

11 

11 

10 

10 

11 

12 
9 
9 
9 
6 



C. 
C. 
C. 
C. 
F. 
C. 
C. 
C. 
C. 
C. 



6 F. 



12 F. 
5 C. 
5 C. 
4 C. 



C. 
C. 
C. 
C. 
C. 
C. 
C. 
C. 

c. 



Birch Field. (80) 
Exrs Ewart V. 

Rake Lane. (19) 

Trust. Cemetery 
Widdowson C. 



3 F. 



5 C. 
12 F, 



7 7 



i 



OV^fC 



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442 

Turton, W. 

Richardson, J. 
Gore, H. 
Maddock, T. 
Evans, S. 
Jones, Mrs. 
Edwards, Mary 
Padmore, Mrs. 
Dickson, G. 
Harding, J. 



Hughes, Mrs, 
Reddish, T. 



Taylor, D. 
Hodgson, A. 
Cordes, J. J. 
Frodsham, R. 



APPENDIX. 

Anderton C. 

Mill Lane. (20) 

Wood 

Gore 

Remmington 

Ditto 

Ditto 

Ditto 

Ditto 

Waugh 

Ditto 

Whitefield Lane. (21) 

Gibbon C. & G. 

Self V. 

Hangfield Lane. (22) 

Exrs Harding H. 

Ditto V. 

Ditto V. 

Perry C. 



12 F. 



H. & G. 11 
H. & G. 11 
H. & G. 11 
H. & G. 12 C 
H. & G. 11 C 
H. & G. 12 C 
H. & G. 12 C 
H. & G. 11 C 
H. & G. 11 C 



C. 
C. 
C. 



Powell, R. 
Reeves, T. 
M'Guire, Rev. W. 

Empty 
Spencer, Richard 
Rose, J. 
Pickering, W. 

Empty 
Barnes, H. 
Harding, Mrs. 
Milner, T. 
Law, Mrs. J. 



Breck Lane 

Self 

Self 

Reeves 

Ditto 

Richardson 

Rose 

Self 

Gillespie 

Self 

Exr§ Harding 

Exrs Barton 

Rogersbn 



(23) 
V. 
V. 
H. 
H. 
G. 
V. 
V. 
H. 
H. 
V. 
V. 
V. 



11 F. & L. 
9 F. 



12 L. 

3 L. 

8 L. 
12 



8 L. 
L. 

10 L. 

9 L. 
12 L. 

11 L. 
9 L. 

10 L. 
9 L. 
3 L. 

8 C. 

9 C. 



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APPENDIX. 






442 


Fry, J. 


Self 


V. 




5 C. 


Mawdsley, E. 


Self 


V. 




11 C. 


Naylor, R. 


Self 


H. 


&G. 


11 C. 


Ovens, R. 


Self 


H. 


&G. 


11 C. 


Weetman, J. 


Ovens 


H. 


&G. 


11 C. 


Wilson, R. 


Thompson 


H. 


&G. 


12 C. 


Heaton, J. 


Self 


H. 


&G. 


11 C. 


Ball, J. 


Self 


H. 


&G. 


11 C. 


Tweddell, Rev. 


R. Jones 


V. 




9 C. 


Bowman, Mrs. 


Pyke 


H. 




10 C. 


Maynard, T. 


Self 


H. 


&G. 


11 C. 


Empty 


Heaton 


H. 


&G. 


11 C. 


Empty 


Ditto 


H. 


&G. 


11 C. 


Thomas, R. 


Thompson 


H. 


&G. 


12 C. 




Prince Edwin Street 


. (24) 




Hodgson, D. 


Exrs Adamson 


V. 




6 C. 


Appleton, W. 


Self 


V. 




3 C. &F 


Bryan, R. 


Dale 


V. 




8 F. 


Mossman, A. 


Cope 


V. 




7 F. 


Moore, T. 


Bickersteth 


V. 




7 F. 


Da Costa, A. J 


Bowden 


V. 




9 F. 


Benson, J. 


Robinson 


V. 




7 F. 


Robinson, G. 


Self 


v, 




9 F. 


Taylor, J. 


Robinson 


V. 




9 F. 


Cope, B. 


Self 


V. 




10 F. 


Appleton, R. 


Robinson 


V. 




8 F. &C 


Empty 


Ditto 


V. 




8F.&C 




Great Nelson Street. (25) 




Houghton, R. 


Self 


V. 




2 


Pennington, J. 


Birtles 


H. 




10 F. 


Hughes, T. 


Ditto 


H. 




10 F. 


Bankes, H. 


Ditto 


H. 




10 F. 


Empty 


Ditto 


H. 




10 F. 



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444 


APPENDIX. 






Wilson, J. 


Birtles 


H. 


10 F. 


Wright, Mrs. 


Ditto 


H. 


10 F, 


Great Homer Street 


. (26) 




Irvin, I. 


Davies 


H. 


10 C. 


Strickland, Mrs. 


Taylor 


H. 


10 C, 


Empty 


Ditto 


H. 


10 C. 


Sutherland 


Ditto 


Hi 


10 c. 


Taylor, R. 


Ditto 


H. 


10 c. 


Berthoud, J. 


Clough 


H. 


10 c, 


Strickland, J. 


Clough 


H. 


10 G 


Trougher, Mrs. 


Self 


H. 


10 c 


Farnworth, Miss 


Brewe 


H. 


10 c 


Kenworthy, Mrs. 


Ditto 


H. 


10 c 


Ellison, T. 


Self 


H. 


io C 


Cleworth, J. 


Self 


H. 


9 C 


Empty 


Taylor 


H. 


10 c 


Cudd, J. 


Parry 


H. 


10 c 


Geddes, J. J. 


Self 


H. 


10 c 


Jones, J. 


Parry 


H. 


10 c 


Brettargh, T. 


Hargreaves 


Inn 


6 C 


Greenall, E. 


Worrall 


H. 


10 c 


Rothwell, H. 


Wilson 


H. 


10 c 


Swift, J. 


Christian 


H. 


11 c 


Fothergill, W. 


Pierce 


H. 


11 c 


Hibbert, T. 


Ditto 


H. 


11 c 


Empty 


Christian 


H. 


11 c 


Sudlow, T. M. 


Gill 


H. 


11 c 


Gill, J. 


Ditto 


H. 


10 c 


Gill, Joseph 


Ditto 


H. 


io C, 


Randies, J. H. 


Jones 


H. 


11 c 


Jones, John 


Self 


H. 


11 c 


Mc Kee, S. 


Brown 


H. 


10 c 


Dutton, J. 


Ball 


H. 


10 c 


Hillam, T. 


Self v 


H. 


10 c 



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APPENDIX. 






Toxall, Mrs. 


Hayes 


H. 


10 C. 


Empty 


Griffiths 


H. 


10 C. 


Sim, J. 


Dumbell 


H. 


10 C. 


Cooper, T. 


Williams 


H. 


11 C. 


Nicholson, G. W. 


Duckworth 


H. 


11 C. 


Anstice, J. B. 


Williams 


H. 


11 C. 


Kenyon, Mrs. 


Ditto 


H. 


11 C. 




Rose Vale. (27) 




Ridgway, Mrs. 


Wilson 


H. 


10 C. 


Beakbane, T. 


Carter 


H. 


10 C. 


Wilson, Mrs. 


Wilson 


H. 


10 C. 


Skerratt, W. N. 


Ditto 


H. 


10 C. 


Lowe, A. 


Exrs Jones 


H. 


10 c. 


Foster, W. Sen. 


Williams 


H. 


10 c. 


Foster, J. 


Ditto 


H. 


10 c. 


Empty 


Byrom 


H. 


10 c. 


Sutton, A. 


Ditto 


H. 


10 c. 


Carr, Mrs. M. 


Ditto 


H. &G. 


10 c. 


Davies, H. 


Ditto 


H. &G. 


10 c. 


Portland Place. 


(28) 




Dawbarn, J. 


Jones 


H. 


11 c. 


Keogh, L. 


Gill 


H. 


11 c. 


Parkinson, R. 


Stewart 


H. 


11 c. 


Sudlow, H. 


Gill 


H. 


11 c. 


Collard, A. 


Lucas 


H. 


11 c. 


Langtree, G. 


Williams 


H. 


10 c. 


Hammitton, R. H. 


Ditto 


H. 


10 c. 


Moorehouse, J. 


Self 


H. 


10 c. 


Baddenach, George 
Trotter, T. 




H. 
H. 


10 c. 


Woods 


10 c. 


Blundell, Mrs. J. 


Ditto 


H. 


10 c. 


Matthews, Mrs. M. 


Self 


H. 


10 c. 


Perry, J. 


Williams 


H. 


10 c. 



445 



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446 


APPENDIX. 






Empty 


Williams 


H. 


10 C. 


Nicholson, Miss 


Ditto 


H. 


10 C. 


Taylor, John 


Self 


H. 


10 c. 


Haskayne, W. 


Self 


H. 


10 c. 


Collard, Miss 


Smith 


H. 


io Gj 


Carrick, Mrs. 


Steele 


H. 


10 c. 


Downing, B. H. 


Williams 


H. 


10 c. 




Dryden Street. 


(29) 




ShotweD, Mrs. 


Clough 


H. 


11 c. 


Cave, R. 


Picton 


H. 


12 C. 


Muir, J. 


Ditto 


H. 


11 c. 


Webster, J. 


Stanley 


H. 


12 C 


Ellis, R. 


Ditto 


H. 


12 C 




Virgil Street. 


(30) 




Lindsay, W. 


Exrs Brewe- 


H. 


11 C 


Byrne, C. H. 


Ditto 


H. 


11 C 


Fair, J. 


Ditto 


H. 


11 C 


Ackers, J. 


Ditto 


H. 


11 C 


Tyson, W. 


Ditto 


H. 


11 C 


Warren, J. H. 


Taylor 


H. 


11 C. 


Mercer, Mrs. 


Self 


H. 


11 C. 


Crank, T. 


Self 


H. 


11 C. 


Lamb, J. 


Crank 


H. 


11 C. 


Shaw, W. 


Collard 


H. 


11 c. 


Empty 


Arrowsmith 


H. 


11 c 


Wommersley, J. 


Crank 


H. 


11 c. 


Healing, Elizabeth Ditto 


H. 


11 c 


Cummins, R. 


Self 


H. 


11 c 


Edwards R: 


Shaw 


H. 


11 c 


Empty 


Ditto 


H. 


11 c 


Atherton, Captain 


J. Pierce 


H. 


11 c 


Higgin, Mrs. M. 


Williams 


H. 


12 C 


Williams, W. 


Ditto 


H. 


12 C 


Mills, E. 


Ditto 


H. 


12 C. 



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APPENDIX. 






Crewdson, A. 


Ditto 


H. 


12 C. 


Mills, J. 


Worrall 




12 C. 




COLLINGWOOD StREEI 


'. (31) 




Burden, W. 


Clough 


H. 


11 C. 


Caesar, T. 


Self 


H. 


12 C. 


Quale, Margaret Christian 


H. 


12 C. 


Fox, T. 


Self 


H. 


11 C. 


Johnson, J. 


Self 


H. 


10 C. 


Empty 


Brewe 


H. 


9 C. 


Williams, W. 


Self 


H. 


11 C. 


Renwick, J. 


Williams 


H. 


11 C. 


Owens, R. 


Self 


H. 


12 C. 


Kirkman, R. 




H. 


12 C. 


Price, T. 


Ford 


H. 


11 C. 


Cowell, W. 


Ditto 


H. 


11 C. 


Pugh, E. 


Davies 


H. 


12 C. 


Newton, R. 


Edwards 


H. 


12 C. 


Fairhurst, M. 


Jones 


H. 


12 C. 


Jones, W. 


Jones 


H. 


12 C. 




Roscommon Street. 


(32) 




Davies, J. 


Self 


H. &G. 


9 C. 


Wainwright, G. 


J. Self 


H. &G. 


9 C. 


Jackson, J. 


Self 


H. &G. 


9 C. 


Bryans, J. 


Davies 


H. &G. 


9 C. 


Stockdale, T. 


Ditto 


H. &G. 


9 C. 


Bird, Mrs. 


Self 


H. & G. 


8 C. 


Irlam, G .B. 


Rowlands 


H. & G. 


7 C. 


Cliffe, A. 


Byrom 


H. & G. 


8 C. 


Turner, G. 


Carson 


H. &G. 


4 C. 


Glazebrook, F. 


J. Brown 


H. 


9 C. 


Empty 


Ditto 


H. 


9 C. 


Hutchinson, J. 


Manifold 


H. 


9 C. 


Tronson, R. 


Hillam 


H. 


9 C. 


Dale, J. 


Walker 


H. 


9 C. 



447 



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448 


APPENDIX. 






Harrison, D. 


Duckworth 


H. 


11 C 


Cator, W. 


Ditto 


H. 


9 C 


Sanderson, H. J. 


Self 


H. 


6 C 


Johnson, George 


Self 


H. 


6 C 


Smallwood, Mrs. 


Exrs Roper 


H. 


8 C 


M'Cheane, W. 


Self 


H. 


10 C 


Dodson, Miss 


Syers 


H. 


10 C. 


Aspinall, R. 


Ditto 


H. 


9 C 


Parton, J. 


Atherton 


H. 


9 C 


Foster, William, 


J. Exrs Beetinson 


H. 


7 C 


Johnson, Mrs. 


Sanderson 


H. 


9 C 


Booker, T. 


Appleton 


Brewery 


5 C 


Adamson, T. 


Self 


H. 


10 C 


Parlane, A. 


Exrs Wiatt 


H. 


7 C 


Beetinson, Mrs. 


Exrs Beetinson 


H. 


8 C 


Harrison, D. 


Self 


H. 


8 C 


Wiatt, Mrs. M. 


Self 


H. 


8 C 


Jones, E. 


Exrs Wiatt 


H. 


12 C 


Martindale, W. 


Cleworth 


S. 


12 C 




Webster Street. 


(33) 




Dooly, J. 


Exrs Watmough S. 


12 F 


Lessey, D. 


Fog 


H. 


11 F 


Parkinson, A. 


Ditto 


H. 


11 F 


Abraham, W. 


Ditto 


H. 


11 F, 


Taylor, T. 


Self 


H. 


12 F. 


Mottershead. T. 


Taylor 


H. 


12 F. 


Spencer, H. 


Self 


H. 


10 F. 


Edwards, J. 


Spencer 


H. 


11 F. 


Watkin, J. 


Brown 


H. 


11 F. 


Hesketh, B. 


Molyneux 


H. 


11 F. 


M'Rae, J. 


CI ague 


H. 


11 F. 


Hayes, J. 


Ditto 


H. 


11 F. 


M'Kenzie, J. 


Ditto 


H. 


12 F. 


Haddock, H. 


Self 


H. 


11 F, 



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APPENDIX. 449 

Bowman, W. Pritchard H. 1 i F. 

Shaw, W. C. Ditto H. 11 F. 

Halliday, P. Ditto H. 11 F. 

Billing, W. Ditto H. 11 F. 

Wilson, H. Davies H. 11 F. 

Strickland Street. {34) 

M'Kenzie, A. Self H. 12 F. 

Agar, Mrs. Burland H. 12 F. 

Bowerbank, F. Self H. 12 F. 

York, E. Shewell H. 12 F. 

Empty Nicholson H. 12 F. 

Forshaw, H. Ditto H. 12 F. 

Howarth, R. Formby H. 12 F. 

Wilson, F. Moore H. 12 F. 

Berry, W. Forshaw H. 12 F. 

Empty Hooper H. 12 F. 

Haydock, H. Self Stable 12 F. 

Whitbread, J. Molyneux H. 12 F. 

Bickerstaff, W. Linney H. 12 F. 

Walter, T. Ditto H. 12 F. 

M'Mullin, J. Spencer H. 12 F. 

Tyrrell, G. M'Guffie H. 11 F. 

Clague, Robert Self H. 12 F. 

Leggett, J. Pritchard H. 12 F. 

Wright, Mrs. Ditto H. 12 F. 

Barrow, Mrs. J. Ditto H. 12 F. 

Pritchard, T. Ditto H. 12 F. 



Back Prince Edwin Street. (35) 



Campbell, P. Cope H. 

Bebbington Ditto H. 

Perry, R. Ditto H. 

Wellington Street. (36) 
Steele, J. Steele . H. 

2 G 



12 F. 
12 F. 

12 F. 



11 F. 



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450 


APPENDIX. 






Walklate, Mrs. 


Edmonson 


H. 


11 F. 


Ward, J. 


Ditto 


H. 


11 F. 


Corkindale, H. 


Self 


H. 


11 F 


Upper Beau Street. 


(37) 




Handy, W. B. 


Corkindale 


H. 


11 F 


Ellis, G. 


Henshaw 


H. 


11 F 


Hilton, Rev. J. 


Emery 


H. 


11 F. 


Chaffers, J. 


Ditto 


H. 


10 F. 


Sutton, William 


Ditto 


H. 


10 F. 


Nixon, T. 


Ditto 


H. 


10 F. 


Atherton, Mrs. 


Spencer 


H. 


11 F. 


Yelverton, T. 


Goslin 


H. 


11 F. 


Mercer, H. 


Ditto 


H. 


11 F 


Price, R. 


Exs. Hilton 


H. 


11 F 


Jump, Mrs. E. 


Self 


H. 


11 F. 


Brown, Ann 


Forrest 


H. 


11 F. 


Swire, S. 


Padley 


H. 


11 F 


Oxley, T. 


Ditto 


H. 


11 F 


Empty 


Forrest 


H. 


11 F 


Taylor, E. 


Binkes 


H. 


— F 


Robinson, George 


Self 


H. 


— F 


Birkett, W. 


Chandler 


H. 


— F, 


Taylor, Mrs. 


Self 


H. 


— F. 


Mason, S. 


Self 


H. 


— F 


Beresford Street. 


(38) 




Chaffers, Mrs. 


Padley 


H. 


— F 


Dagnall, J. 


Hayman 


H. 


— F 


Brennand, M. 


Edmonson 


H. 


— F 


Edmonson, W. 


Self 


H. 


— F. 


Hazlett, Elizabeth 


Bramwall 


H. 


— F. 


Maddock, S. 


Hindle 


H. 


— F 


Empty 


Ditto 


H. 


— F 


Back Strickland Street. (39) 




Mc Gregor, W. 


Spencer 


H. 


12 F. 



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Metcalf, J. 
Kelsall, J. 



Jukes, J. 
Shand, W. 
Jones, Thomas 
Hind, Mrs. 
Miller, Mrs. 
Appleton, T. 



APPENDIX. 

Hankin 
Ditto 



451 



H. 
H. 



Mary Ann Street. (40) 

Exrs Thompson H. 
Exrs Beetenson V. 
Self V. 

Heyworth H. 

Exrs Beetenson H. 
Byrom H. 



Watmough Street. (48) 
Wylie, D. Self H. 

Watmough, Mrs. Exrs Watmough H. 

Forrest, T. Self H. 

Haworth Street. (78) 



12 F. 
12 F. 



9 L. 

6 L. 

8 L. 
11 L. 
11 L. 
11 L. 

11 F. 
11 F. 
11 F. 



Santley, J, 


Taylor 


H. 




12 F. 


Clay, J. 


Ditto 
Pinfold House. 


h. 

(55) 




12 F. 


Johnson, J. 


Township 


H. 




12 L. 




Beacon Lane Cottages. 


(9) 




Davies, R. 


Mc George 


H. 




12 L. 


Wilson, R. 


Ditto 


H. 




12 L. 


Harrison, C. 


Ditto 


H. 




12 L. 


Foster, C. 


Ditto 


H. 




12 L. 


Fairclough, R. 


Pritchard 
Clifton Street. 


H. 

(71) 




12 L 


Wilson, W. 


Not ascertained H. 




11 F. 


Dickson, Mrs. 


Ditto 


H. 




11 F, 


Bishop, J. H. 


Ditto 


H. 




11 F. 


Glover, R. 


Ditto 
John Street. 


H. 

(42) 




11 F. 


Me George, J. 


Self 


H, 


&G. 


10 L 



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452 


APPENDIX. 








Grenville Street. 


(46) 




Fairclough, T. 


Mc Gee 


H. 


12 C. 


Marshall, R. 


Not ascertained H. 


11 C. 


Houghton, J. 


Ditto 


H. 


12 C. 




Grecian Terrace. 


(59) 




Davies, J. R. 


Atherton 


V. 


8 L. 


Empty 


Ditto 


V. 


8 L. 


Empty 


Ditto 


V. 


8 L. 


Empty 


Ditto 


V. 


8 L. 




Shaw Street. (43) 




Christian, G. 


Lyon 


H. 


7 F. 


Rawdon, J. 


Ditto 


H. 


8 F. 


Empty 


Reed 


H. 


7 F. 


Whitley, J. 


Self 


H. 


3 F. 


Empty 


Hartley 


H. 


7 F. 


Empty 


Hankin 


H. 


7 F. 


Empty 


Ditto 


H. 


7 F. 




Waterhouse Lane. 


(57) 




Stokes, Mrs. 


Waterhouse 


H. 


12 C. 


Waterhouse, Mrs. Self 


V. 


1 C. 




York Terrace. 


(58) 




- Empty 


Atherton 


V. 


10 L. 


Ditto 


Ditto 


V. 


10 L. 


Ditto 


Ditto 


V. 


10 L. 


Ditto 


Ditto 


V. 


10 L. 


Ditto 


Ditto 


V. 


10 L. 


Ditto 


Ditto 


V. 


10 L. 




Stretch's Court. 


(75) 




James, A. 


Stretch 


c. 


12 L. 


Leigh, W. 


Ditto 


c. 


12 L. 


Boyle, A. 


Ditto 


c. 


12 L. 



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APPENDIX. 



453 



DIRECTORY FOR EVERTON. 1830. 

The figures denote the street or place at which each person 
resides; and a table is given, at page 460, et seq., in which each 
street will be found, numbered from 1 to 87 inclusive. 



Appleton, Thomas 


40 


Bruce, Rev. J. 


19 


Atherton, James 


13 


Bebbington, John 


2 


Anderton, Thomas 


3 


Barton, Miles 


15 


Aspinall, Thomas 


16 


Belcher, Michael 


11 


Appleton, William 


24 


Bull, Mrs. 


16 


Ashcroft, Edmund 


5 


Benson, John 


24 


Alston, J. F. 


3 


Brooks, Rev. J. 


18 


Aspinall, Richard 


32 


Ball, Thomas 


4 


Adamson, Thomas 


; 32 


Beakbane, Thomas 


27 


Abraham, William 


33 


Bootle Water Works 


5 


Atherton, Mrs. 


37 


Buddicom, Rev. R. P 


13 


Atherton, Capt. James 


30 


Best, Miss 


15 


Ackers, Joseph 


30 


Branch, Thomas 


15 


Attwood, Mr. 


4 


Brown, Ann 


37 


Anderson, John 


6 


Buchanan, John 


5 


Attwood, J. T. 


5 


Bowerbank, Thomas 


34 


Atherton, Robert 


17 


Berthoud, Julius 


26 


Agar, Ann 


34 


Banks, Henry 


25 


Appleton, Rains 


24 


Barry, William 


34 


Austice, J. B. 


26 


Brennand, Miss 


38 






Barton, Mrs. S. 


3 


Blundell, Mrs. Mary 


1 


Barrow, Mrs. Jane 


34 


Brown, William 


3 


Bickerstaff, William, . 


34 


Benn, Robert 


16 


Blundell, Mrs. Jane 


28 


Bird, Mrs. 


32 


Baddenoch, G. G. 


28 


Boardman, John 


4 


Barnes, Henry 


23 


Beetenson, Mrs. 


32 


Bryans, R. 


24 


Batley, George 


15 


Billing, William 


33 


Boothby, J. B. 


4 


Bryans, James 


32 


Buchanan, Daniel 


18 


Brocklebank, Mrs. 


7 


Boardman, R. B. 


4 


Barton, Miss 


15 


Brown, George 


1 


Brebner, James 


1 



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454 


APPENDIX. . 


Bowman, Mrs 


23 


Clay, John 


Barker, J. R. 


13 


Carter, William 


Brown, W. A. 


13 


Cooke, William 


Brawn, Laurence 


15 


Cowell, William 


Brettargh, Thomas 


26 


Cannell, Miss 


Booker, Thomas 


32 


Cooper, Thomas 


Boyle, Alexander 


75 


Chaffers, J. 


Baldwin, W. H. 


4 


Creer, Robert 


Bickersteth, William . 


5 


Cordes, J. A. 


Ball, J.- 


23 


Cudd, James 


Byrne, C. H. 


30 


Carrick, Mrs. 


Burden> W. 


31 


Caesar, Thomas 


Bowman, W. 


33 


Coleburn, Mrs. 


Bebbington 


35 


Collard, Abraham 


Birkett, W. 


37 


Cave, R. 


Bishop, J. H. 


71 


Crewdson, A. 
Clague, Robert 


Carson, John 


4 


Campbell, P. 


Campbell, Colin 


4 


Chaffers, Mrs. 


Corrie, Miss 





Christian, George 


Chaffers, Miss 


17 




Crank, Thomas 


30 


Dixon, William 


Cliff, Adam 


32 


Dobson, Richard 


Cropper, John 


4 


Dyson, T. F. 


Chew, Mrs. 


4 


Drinkwater, Exrs of . 


Cope, Benjamin 


24 


.Davies, Henry- 


Coleman, Miss 


18 


Downing, B. H. 


Campbell, John 


4 


Duly, Richard 


Cooper, John 


2 


Dickson, G. F. 


Coleman, Robert 


11 


Dodson, Miss 


Cleworth, Joseph 


26 


Davies, John 


Collard> Miss 


28 


Dale, John 


Clare, George 


5 


Duarte, T. J. 


Calor, William 


32 


Dutton, John 


Cummins, Richard 


30 


Dagnall, John 


Cowgill, Mrs. 


16 


Davidson, John 


Corkendale, Mrs. 


36 


Dawbarn, John 


Carr, Mrs. 


27 


Dooly, John 



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APPENDIX. 


400 


Davies, Richard 


9 


Foden, William 


11 


Delonde, C* 


5 


Foster, J. 


27 


Dickson, G. 


20 


Fox, T. 


31 


Da Costa, A. J. 


24 


Fairclough, T. 


46 


Dickson, Mrs. 
Davies, J. R. 


71 

59 


Gandy, W. J. 
Gill, Joseph 


5 

26 


Earle, William 
Eyes, Miss 
Ellison, Miss 
Edwards, James 
Edwards, Robert 
Ellison, Timothy 
Edmonson, William . 


4 
4 
3 
33 
30 
26 
38 


Gill, James 
Guest, Joseph 
Geddes, J. J. 
Gore, H. 
Greenall, C. 
Glazebrook, F. J. 
Glover, R. 


2G 
15 
26 
20 
26 
32 
71 


Evans, Samuel 


20 


Hay dock, H. 


34 


Ellis, George 


37 


Houghton, J. 


46 


English, Thomas 


15 


Heskelh, B. 


33 


Edwards, Mary 


20 


Haines, Richard 


1 


Ellis, R. 


29 


Hanmer, Latham 


2 






Harrop, John 


5 


Fothergill, W. 


2G 


Halliday, William 


16 


Fairhurst, Michael 


* 31 


Higginson, John 


15 


Forshaw, Hugh 


34 


Houghton, Richard 


25 


Fair, Miss Alice 


5 


Harrison, Isaac 


32 


Forrest> Thomas 


* 48 


Haworth, Mrs. 


3 


Fennel, Charles 


15 


Houghton, James 


2 


Frodsham, Richard 


22 


Hutchinson, John 


32 


Foster, Christopher 


9 


Hope, Samuel 


15 


Fair, John 


30 


Harris, Thomas 


11 


Foster, William, Sen. 


27 


Harrison, Daniel 


32 


Foster, William, Jun. 


32 


Hillam, Thomas 


26 


Fosberry, William 


18 


Holmes, James 


4 


Fry, Joseph 


23 


Holmes, John 


'2 


Farnworth, Miss 


2G 


Holmes, Henry 


2 


Franklin, Thos. (41) 


4 


Hodgson, David 


24 


Fairclough, Richard 


9 


Horsfall, Charles 


4 


Flemming, Thomas 


15 


Heyworth, Ormerod 


13 


Forshaw, Mrs. 


5 


Heyworth, James 


14 



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406 


APPENDIX. 


Henry, William 


14 


Johnson, Mrs. 


Hind, Mrs. 


40 


Jones, Chris. H. 


Hornby, Joseph 


13 


Jones, Thomas 


Hitchmough, John 


17 


Jones, John 


Hodgson, Adam 


22 


Jones, Mrs. Sarah 


Harding, Mrs. 


23 


Jones, Mrs. 


Hilton, Rev. Mr. 


37 


Johnson, Mrs. 


Hughes, Miss 


15 


Johnson, George 


Handy, W. B. 


37 


Jones, John 


Healing, Mrs. Eliz. 


30 


Jones, John 


Haskayne, William 


28 


James, Andrew 


Haworth, Robert 


34 


Johnson, James 


Hindi e, John 


7 


Johnson, John 


Harrison, William 


17 


Irlam, G. B. 


Hibbert, Thomas 


26 


Jones, Edward 


Hughes, Thomas 


25 


Jump, Mrs. Eliz. 


Hamilton, R. H. 


28 


Jones, John 


Harper, David 


7 


Johnson, Joseph 


Humphries, David 


13 


Ironsides, C. 


Halliday, Peter 


33 


Irvin, J. 


Haddock, Heniy 


33 


Jones, J. 


Heaton, James 


23 


Jones, W. 


Hughes, Mrs. 


21 


Jukes, J. 


Harrison, Christ. 


9 




Heyes, J. 


33 


Keogh, Lawrence 


Howe, John 


4 


Knowles, Thomas 


Hankin, William 


4 


Kitchen, J. E. 


Holmes, Isaac 


17 


Kirkman, Robert 


Hazlett, Elizabeth 


30 


Kendall, Mrs. E. 


Harding, J. 


20 


Kenworthy, Mrs. 


Higgin, Mrs. 


30 


Kelsall,W. 


Hall, C. 


*4 




Hutton, B. 


4 


Livingstone, Mrs. 


Hornby, J. 


. 13 


Lister, Edward (41) . 


- 




Lorimer, Mrs. 


Jackson, John 


32 


Laffer, Heniy 


Jackson, William 


4 


Latham, Mrs. Alice 


Jones, William 


17 


Lowrie, Thomas 



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Ledson, Robert 


j\ jr r £j j 

4 


Moon, James 


13 


Lorimer, Charles 


11 


Mercer, Henry 


37 


Lapage, Frederick 


3 


Mason, Stanhope 


37 


Lang, John 


7 


Muller, John F. 


15 


Ledward, Edward 


13 


Matthews, Mrs. Mary 


28 


Logan, James 


18 


Miller, Mrs. 


40 


Lodge, Adam 


18 


Moore, Stephen 


15 


Law, Mrs. Jane 


23 


Middleton, Charles S. 


13 


Lyon, John 


17 


M'Rae, J. 


37 


Lindsay, William 


30 


Maddox, Joseph 


20 


Latham, Arthur 


18 


M'Mulling, J. 


34 


Leigh, William 


75 


Moorhouse, John 


28 


Lowe, Adrian 


27 


Myers, Robert 


10 


Langtree, George 


28 


M'Kee, Samuel 


2G 


Lindsay, W. 


30 


Mottershead, T. 


5 


Lamb, J. 


30 


Morgan, J. 


6 


Lessey, D. 


33 


Maxwell, J. 


6 


Leggat, J. 


34 


Maynard, T. 


23 






Mossman, Adam 


24 


Mills, E. 


31 


Moor, Thomas 


24 


Mills, J. 


31 


M'Guire, Rev. 


23 


Martindale, W. 


32 


Millner, T. 


23 


Mottershead, T. 


37 


Muir, J. 


29 


Maddock, S. 


38 






M'Gregor, W. 


39 


Naylor, Richard 


23 


Metcalf, J. 


39 


Nickson, Thomas 


37 


Marshall, R. 


46 


Nicholson, William 


28 


Marsh, Mrs. 


3 


Neale, 


1 


Mather, John P. 


4 


Nicholson, Miss 


28 


M'George, John 


42 


Newton, R. 


31 


M'Cheane, W. 


32 






M'George, Miss 


11 


Oven, R. 


23 


Mawdsley, Edward 


23 


Owens, Richard 


31 


Myers, William 


12 


Oxley, Thomas 


37 


M'Kenzie, Alexander 


34 






M'Kenzie, John 


37 


Perry, William 


11 


Martinborough, John 


35 


Potter, Miss - 


11 


Mercer, Mrs. 


30 


Pyke, John 


17 



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458 


APPENDIX. 


Potter, Mrs. 


4 


Rogerson, James 


Pritchard, Mrs, 


8 


Rainford, Thomas 


Parry, Robert 


11 


Rothwell, William 


Parlane, Alexander 


32 


Ramsbottom, George . 


Prescot, William 


2 


Ross, H. W. 


Powell, Richard 


23 


Rose, James 


Pickering, William 


23 


Randalls, J. H. 


Pennington, John 


15 


Renwick, James 


Parton, J. 


32 


Rawdon, J. 


Price, Thomas 


31 


Robinson, George 


Parkinson, Arthur 


33 


Rawdon, J. 


Powles, Alfred William 


2 


Radcliffe, W. 


Pearson, John 


5 


Richardson, Captain . 


Padmore, Mrs. 


20 


Roach, Mrs. 


Pritchard, Thomas 


34 




Post Office 


15 


Sudlow, H. 


Parkinson, Robert 


28 


Shotwell, Mrs. 


Perry, John 


28 


Shaw, W. C. 


Porter, T. 


1 


Spencer, Richard 


Pugh, E. 


31 


Sutton, William 


Parry, R. 


35 


Stokes, Mrs. 


Price, Richard 


37 


Syers, George 


Pennington, John 


25 


Shaw, Thomas 
Strickland, J. 


Quale, Margaret 


31 


Smallwood, Mrs. 
Sanderson, H. J. 


Rowe, Miss 


1 


Styles, Samuel 


Robinson, William 


3 


Sharp, Miss 


Rutter, Mrs. 


18 


Shaw, William 


Robinson, George 


24 


Staniforth, Samuel 


Russell, William 


18 


Syers, William 


Ridgway, Mrs. 


27 


Shand, William 


Reid, Lady 


5 


Salkeld, George 


Robson, Thomas 


17 


Stockdale, Thomas 


Richardson, Jos. 


20 


Slingsby, James 


Reddish, Thomas 


21 


Swift, James 


Reeves, Thomas 


23 


Sutton, Ashton 


Roth well, Henry 


20 


Shand, Charles 



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APPENDIX. 



459 



Sandiford, Robert 
Slingsby, James 
Syers, Robert 
Scurr, John 
Stevenson, Charles 
Smith, John 
Shaw, William 
Sutherland, John 
Simpson, Joseph • 
Strickland, Mrs. 
Sudlow, Thomas M. 
Stennet, Mrs. A. 
Sim, J. 

Swire, Samuel 
Smith, James 
Sands, Thomas 
Spencer, Henry 
Santly, John 
Sandiford, John 
Skerrat, W. N. 
Swift, Mrs. J. 
Steele, J. 

Tomlinson, John 
Tarlton, Miss 
Taylor, John 
Turner, George 
Tattersall, Thomas 
Thomas, Edward 
Topping, Mrs. 
Tatlock, Mrs. 
Tronson, Robert 
Tatlock, William 
Taylor, John 
Thompson, Alexande: 
Taylor, John 
Tweddle, Rev. R. 
Tyson, William 



17 Taylor, Edmund . 37 

17 Taylor, Mrs. Mary . 37 

4 Trough er, Mrs. Jane . 26 

4 Taylor, Thomas . 33 

17 Turton, William . 19 

17 Taylor, J. . 16 
30 Taylor, D. . 22 
26 Taylor, Richard . 26 

3 Thomas, R. . 23 

26 Toxall, Mrs. . 26 

26 Trotter, T. . 28 
2 Tyrrell, G. . 34 

26 

37 Unsworth, J. . 1 
5 

18 Waterhouse, Mrs. . 57 
33 Wainwright, T. W. . 3 
70 Wiatt, Mrs. Mary . 32 

9 Warren, John H. . 30 

27 Whalley, John . 9 
6 Wright, John . 1 

36 Wainwright, George J. 32 

Wainer, Charles . 60 

1 Wilson, William . 14 

4 Wrenshall, William . 17 

15 Williams, William . 11 

32 Wright, Mrs. . 25 

15 Wilson, John . 25 

15 Wilson, H. . 33 

17 Wommersly, John . 30 

17 Wybergh, John . 11 

32 Wilson, Mrs. Maiy . ^5 

4 Willasey, Executors of 11 

28 Williams, William . 31 

11 Withers, George . 17 

24 Wain, Mrs. Mary . 18 

23 Wilson, Fred. William 34 

30 - AVoodhouse, Samuel 01 



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460 

Weetman, James 


APPE 
23 


NDIX. 
Watkin, J. 


33 


Wilson, E. 


13 


Ward, J. 


36 


Wilson, Mrs. 


27 


Whitbread, J. 


34 


Williams, Edward 


6 


Walter, T. 


34 


Watkins, Robert 


15 


Watmough, Mrs. 


48 


Wilson, Robert 


23 


Wilson, Wm. 


71 


Wright, Mrs. 


34 


Whitley, J. 


43 


Walklate, Mrs. 


36 


Wrightson, George 


56 


Wylie, David 


48 






Woolton, John 


78 


Yates, Mrs. Ursula 


1 


Wilson, Robert 


9 


York, Edmund 


34 


Wrigley, J. H. 


7 


Yelverton, W. 


1 


Webster, J. 


29 


Yelverton, T. 


37 


Williams, W. 


30 







EVERTON ROADS. 

The numbers refer to the Directory, The italic capitals and 
small letters refer to the Map, where the streets are marked as 
the letters are placed here. 



1 


Everton Crescent 


16 


> 


Rupert Lane 


2 


Everton Brow 


17 




Village 


3 


Netherfield-rd. south 


18 




Everton Lane 


4 


Netherfield-rd. north 


19 




Rake Lane 


5 B 


Devonshire Place 


20 




Mill Lane 


6 


St. Domingo Lane 


21 




Whitefield Lane 


7 


Everton Valley 


22 




Hangfield Lane 


8 


Walton Breck Lane 


23 




Breck Lane 


9 


Beacon Lane 


24 


U 


Prince Edwin Street 


10 Pp 


Sparling Street 


25 


Q 


Great Nelson Street 


11 


Church Street 


26 


s 


Great Homer Street 


12 


Mere Lane 


27 L 


Rose Vale 


13 F 


Lodge Lane 


28 K 


Portland Place 


14 


Hill Side, or St. 


29 


M 


Dryden Street 




George's Hill 


30 





Virgil Street " 


15 


Terrace 


31 


P 


Collingwood Street 



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APPENDIX. 


461 


32 J 


Roscommon Street 


62 C 


New Street near do. 


33 Z 


Webster Street 


63 Ff 


New do. Breck Lane 


34 Y 


Strickland Street 


64 Gg 


Do. do. 


35 V 


Back Prince Edwin 


65 Uu 


Do. Mere Lane 




Street 


66 T t 


Do. do. ( 


36 


Wellington Street 


67 R r 


Hygeia Street 


37 W 


Upper Bean Street 


68 Kh 


Do. in Great Hey 


38 X 


Beresford Street 


69 


Do. in do. 


39 


Back Strickland St. 


70 


Do. in Little do. 


40 Ii 


Mary Ann Street 


71 Ss 


Clifton Street 


41 Hk 


Gloucester Place 


72 C c 


Upper Mansfield St. 


42 A 


John Street 


73 


New Street opposite 


43 J^ e 


Shaw Street 




Crescent 


U Dd 


Haigh Street 


74 E 


Albion Street 


45 Bb 


Salisbury Street 


15 


Stretch's Court 


46 iV 


Grenville Street 


76 


Great Homer Place 


47 if 


Sackville Street 


77 


Myrtle Court 


48 ^4 a 


Watmough Street 


78 


Haworth Street 


49 


Round Hill Lane 


79 


Edwards Place 


50 


Boundary Lane 


80 


Birch Field 


51 


Breck Lands 


81 


Bronte Lane 


52 


Walton Cop 


82 / 


Back Roscommon St. 


53 LI 


Priory Lane 


83 R 


Birtles Place 


54 


Rocky Lane 


84 T 


Street south of Ros- 


55 


Pinfold Place 




common Street 


56 


Brow Side 


85 Mm 


, Perry Lane 


57 


Waterhouse Lane 


86 o 


Mr. Plumpton's new 


58 D 


York Terrace 




Street 


59 Qq 


Grecian Terrace 


87 G 


Little Street, Ros- 


60 ^ 


Northumberland do. 




common Street 


61 


Albion Crescent 







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402 



APPENDIX. 



O 

H 
m 
O 

P-i 
X 

m 

PL, 
< 



W 



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APPENDIX. 475 

Immediately previous to having impressions taken from the 
engraving of this map, the "Liverpool Sewerage" bill was 
passed ; consequently the engraver has been enabled to trace 
on the plate, the direction, &c. of both the proposed and exist- 
ing streets that are to form the boundary lines between the 
townships of Liverpool and Everton ; the delineation of those 
intended boundary streets is given as copied from a plan in the 
possession of the township of Everton. On perusing the act, 
under the powers of which the said boundary streets are to be 
formed, it has been deemed proper to give, in this work, the fol- 
lowing brief statement of some parts of the clauses of said bill. 

The owners of certain fields, in Everton (and also in Liver- 
pool), through which the intended boundary street (in the 
north) is to pass, are to give the land that may be required to 
form the said boundary street, and such owners of land are to 
make good the fences on their respective fronts to said boundary 
street. 

The narrow strips of land that may be thrown into either or 
both the townships are to be purchased by the corporation of 
Liverpool, and are to be sold by the said corporation to the 
owners of such larger patches or parcels of land to which they 
may adjoin, so as to give such owners a front to the boundary 
street ; and said narrow strips of land " shall, from and after the 
respective conveyances of the same, be and become of the same 
tenure, and subject to the same uses, trusts, &c. as the lands to 
which the same may be respectively adjoined." Everton is to 
keep that part of the intended boundary street in repair that 
extends from the west" end of Roscommon-street, northwardly, 
to the extreme north part of Mrs. Potter's land : Liverpool is 
to keep in repair all the other parts of all the said boundary 
streets that lie between the townships of Liverpool and Everton. 

The east side of the intended boundary streets is to be 
deemed the boundary line. 

No other erection than dwelling-houses to be built to the 
front, on either side of the intended boundary streets, and such 



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476 APPENDIX. 

dwellings are not to be less than six yards wide (in front) ; nor 
shall any steam engine be erected within 200 yards of the 
intended boundary street (except on the west side of the 
Preston road) ; nor on the land that will lie between said street 
and Netherfield-road. 

The said act gives power to form a street, or road, to com- 
mence at the north end of the intended boundary street, at Mrs. 
Potter's land, and to continue along, northwardly, until a junc- 
tion be formed with the great north road, near Kirkdale village; 
the said intended street, or road, to be opened and made on 
the proprietors of the lands through which it is to pass having 
" three calendar months' notice, in writing," from the surveyor 
for the time being of the township of Everton ; — said street or 
road to be of same width as is the north end of the intended 
boundary street, and to be bept in repair by the township of 
Kirkdale. 

The present to be the boundaries of the respective townships, 
until the signing and publication of a certificate, by two magis- 
trates, of the completion of the intended boundary streets, and 
on and after such certificate being signed and published by two 
magistrates, the boundary lines to be as the acts directs, and as 
the boundary streets will denote. 



EXPLANATORY REFERENCES OF THE CHARACTERS, &c. ON 
THE MAP. 



Roads of 1790. 

Roads constructed since 1790. 
O Mere stones. 
O Pits. 

Parcels of land added to, or taken from, the road. 

, Division of leasehold patches from ancient 

freeholds. 
-:.;-; •™—^--^' : ' Foot-path . 
B§3 Buildings. 



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APPENDIX. 477 

• • x *• • X • • X • • X • ' X Divisions of locality to two or more 
persons. 

4- Churches. 

X Ancient crosses. 

O Public pumps. 

The large capitals, F. L. C, denote the tenures of each loca- 
lity, as freehold, leasehold, copyhold. 

The smaller capitals denote the particular streets, the names 
of which are known by each having its respective capital affixed 
to a street or road in the List of streets, at the close of the* 
Appendix. 

The smaller capitals, with an italic letter added, are a con- 
tinuation of references, similar to the last noticed. 



ABSTRACTS FROM PUBLIC DOCUMENTS, AND RECOLLECTIONS, 
TOUCHING LAND GIVEN TO AND SOLD TO THE TOWN- 
SHIP, AND OF LAND ASSIGNED BY THE TOWNSHIP TO 
INDIVIDUALS. 

[Many entries, touching said transfers, will be found in the ex- 
tracts given in this Appendix J] 

1765 The land round the beacon was sold to Henry Hard war 

for £4 4s., reserving a right of road to said beacon, 
(Leasehold.) 

1766 George Campbell bought some land from township, near 

to St. Domingo mere, for £4 13s. (Leasehold.) 
— Some ground was sold to a Mr. Sherratt for £2 2s. 
1770 The township bought the Barn on the Hill, and the land 

thereunto attached, from John Seacome, for £20. — 

(Leasehold.) 
1777 The land called the Netherfeld-lane was sold by the 

township to Joshua Rose for £140. (Leasehold.) 
1781 Mr. John Fisher paid 21s., for some alteration of a wall 

north end of Everton-lane. Mem. A little previous to 

this date, the road near Mr. Gregson's was diverted 

from a straight line. 



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478 APPENDIX. 

1787 Forty-eight square yards of land, opposite (what is now) 
the top of Roscommon-street, was sold by Mr. Joshua 
Rose to the township, together with the pump and well 
on the premises, for £21. (Leasehold.) 

1787 — 8 On an agreement that Is. per yard should be paid for 
the overplus on either side, Mr. Harper gave and took 
land, opposite the coffee-house, and opposite Joseph 
Ellinthorp's buildings ; — the pinfold was removed, and 
the roads hereabout improved. (Copyhold.) 

1789 The township sold to John Sparling, Esq. about one- 

sixth part of an acre of land, Cheshire measure, on the 
north side of Headless Cross. (Leasehold.) 

1790 Mr. Carruthers speaks of having given to the townshir 

600 yards of land, but where, does not appear. 

1800 Power was given to purchase an old building, and a slice 

of land, opposite the house of the late Mrs. Pyke, being 
the east part of the late Bryan Mercer's garden ; which 
purchase was effected, and the road widened. (Copy- 
hold.) 

1801 William Farrar paid £9 12s. 6d. to the township of 

Everton, for 77 square yards of land, at 2s. 6d., fronting 
his field lying on the lower lane from Everton to Kirk- 
dale. (Waste.) 
— Richard Bailiff, of Kirkdale, paid to the township of 
Everton £18 6s., for 180 yards and 30 parts, at 2s. per 
yard, fronting his field in the lower lane leading from 
Everton to Kirkdale. (Waste.) 

1806, 7 A little land. was given to the township by Mr. New- 
ton, at the round-turn on the north part of locality 27 a, 
opposite the present gates of the* late Mr. Mc Gregor*s 
villa: — the township built the fence- wall without cost to 
Mr. Newton. (Leasehold.) 

1 809 A few yards of land was bought, at 5s. per yard, by Mr. 
Mc George, being at the front of his house, in the village. 
(Copyhold.) 






Y 



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APPENDIX. 479 









1809 £21 17s. 6d. was paid to Messrs. Pyke and Woodhouse 
for land they sold the township, near Mr. Halliday's 
stable. (Copyhold.) 

1810 Mr. Edward Rogerson paid £10 10s. for land sold to him. 
1814 Agreed that a pinfold should be formed on waste land, 

at the north-east corner of the mere. — Mem. A cottage 
was also afterwards built there. (Leasehold.) 

1817 Mr. Perry paid £28 5s., for 113 square yards of land, 
nearly opposite to the east end of Priory-lane, in 
Church-street; the road was made straight, and im- 
proved, by this measure. (Waste.) 

1819 Mrs. Potter paid £25 4s. 6d. for land sold to her from 
the township in Netherfield-road north. (Waste.) 

1825 or thereabout. A little land was given and taken at the 
round corner of Mr. Carson's lot, at the north-east 
corner of Roscommon-street. (Leasehold.) 

*826 Six hundred and seventy-two square yards of land was 
bought by the township from J. and R. Fisher, at 8s: 
per square yard ; this land lies at the north-west quarter 
of Everton-lane, where the road is widened accordingly. 
(Copyhold.) 

1829 Mr. Shaw has given a strip of land to the road, on the 
south side of Everton-brow, running westward, from the 
north-west corner of Shaw-street. (Freehold.) 

— Within the last few years, James Plumpton, Esq., in 

drawing a straight line along the west side of Everton- 
lane, gave (at some places little, and at other places 
more,) in all, about 300 yards of land to the township. 
(Copyhold.) 

— Mr. Sandiford gave a small portion of land in front of 

his house to the township. (Copyhold.) 

— Mr. Mc George and others gave a piece of land in front 

of Rupert-place to the township. (Copyhold.) 

— The late Mr. Ellinthorp gave a small point of land, just 

before his south entrance door, to the township. (Lease- 
hold.) 



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DIRECTIONS FOR PLACING THE PLA' 

The Beacon to face page 56. 

The New Cemetery to face page 210. 

The West View of the Church to face page 282 

The Map at the end of the Volume. V'— - 



ERRATA. 

At page 96, the last line, for " salt," read " ore, &c. for sale." 
153, line 26, for "the soil," read "the history of the soi 
167, ,, 1 1, for " wine merchant," read u woollen draj 
199, 
252, „ 18, ^for" Joseph," read "Joshua. 

I 



1U/, ,, J L, 1UI 

199, „ 25,^ 

252, „ 18, Vf 

253, „ 5,) 



D. Marples, Printer, Liverpool. 



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